Publications

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2020
Park, J. - Y., Lee Y. - N., Currie P. J., Kobayashi Y., Koppelhus E., Barsbold R., Mateus O., Lee S., & Kim S. - H. (2020).  Additional skulls of Talarurus plicatospineus (Dinosauria: Ankylosauridae) and implications for paleobiogeography and paleoecology of armored dinosaurs. Cretaceous Research. 108, 104340. Abstractpark_et_al_2020_additional_skulls_of_talarurus_plicatospineus_dinosauria_final.pdfWebsite

Three new additional skull specimens of Talarurus plicatospineus have been recovered from the Upper Cretaceous (Cenomanian–Santonian) Bayanshiree Formation, of Bayan Shiree cliffs, eastern Gobi Desert, Mongolia. The skulls feature unique characters such as an anteriorly protruded single internarial caputegulum, around 20 flat or concave nasal-area caputegulae surrounded by a wide sulcus, a vertically oriented elongate loreal caputegulum with a pitted surface, an elongate lacrimal caputegulum positioned above the posterodorsal border of the maxilla, two longitudinally arranged large frontoparietal caputegulae surrounded by smaller rhomboid caputegulae, small but elongate medial supraorbital caputegulae, a posterior supraorbital caputegulum that is four times larger than the anterior one, up to three transverse parallel grooves on the dorsal surface of the posterior supraorbital caputegulum, postocular caputegulae along the ventral to posterior rim of the orbit that extend almost to the anteroventral margin of the squamosal horn, a longitudinal furrow tapering towards the apex of the squamosal horn, a lateral nuchal caputegulum four to five times larger than other nuchal caputegulae, and a pterygovomerine keel with a ventral margin that is dorsally positioned to the alveolar ridge. The phylogenetic analysis result showed that Talarurus is sister to the clade that includes the derived Asian ankylosaurines (Saichania chulsanensis, Tarchia kielanae, and Zaraapelta nomadis). It also shows that there was dispersal of ankylosaurines from Asia into western North America before the Cenomanian. Moreover, the rostral differences between Talarurus and Tsagantegia, another ankylosaur from the same formation, suggest possible niche partitioning between these taxa.

2019
Guillaume, A. R. D., Moreno-Azanza M., Puértolas-Pascual E., & Mateus O. (2019).  Palaeobiodiversity of crocodylomorphs from the Lourinhã Formation based on the tooth record: insights into the palaeoecology of the Late Jurassic of Portugal. Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society. , 11 Abstractguillaume_et_al_palaeobiodiversity_of_crocodylomorphs_from_the.pdfWebsite

{Crocodylomorphs were a diverse clade in the Late Jurassic of Portugal, with six taxa reported to date. Here we describe 126 isolated teeth recovered by screen-washing of sediments from Valmitão (Lourinhã, Portugal, late Kimmeridgian–Tithonian), a vertebrate microfossil assemblage in which at least five distinct crocodylomorph taxa are represented. Ten morphotypes are described and attributed to five clades (Lusitanisuchus, Atoposauridae, Goniopholididae, Bernissartiidae and an undetermined mesoeucrocodylian). Four different ecomorphotypes are here proposed according to ecological niches and feeding behaviours: these correspond to a diet based on arthropods and small vertebrates (Lusitanisuchus and Atoposauridae), a generalist diet (Goniopholididae), a durophagous diet (Bernissartiidae) and a carnivorous diet. Lusitanisuchus mitracostatus material from Guimarota is here redescribed to achieve a better illustration and comparison with the new material.This assemblage shares similar ecomorphotypes with other Mesozoic west-central European localities, where a diversity of crocodylomorphs lived together, avoiding direct ecological competition through niche partitioning. The absence of large marine crocodylomorphs, present in other contemporaneous assemblages, is here interpreted as evidence that the Valmitão assemblage was deposited in a freshwater environment, although sample bias cannot be completely ruled out. These affinities are further supported by the presence of lanceolate and leaf-shaped teeth associated with continental clades.}

Puértolas-Pascual, E., & Mateus O. (2019).  A three-dimensional skeleton of Goniopholididae from the Late Jurassic of Portugal: implications for the Crocodylomorpha bracing system. Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society. , 10 Abstractpuertolas-pascual__mateus_2019_croc.pdfWebsite

{We here describe an articulated partial skeleton of a small neosuchian crocodylomorph from the Lourinhã Formation (Late Jurassic, Portugal). The skeleton corresponds to the posterior region of the trunk and consists of dorsal, ventral and limb osteoderms, dorsal vertebrae, thoracic ribs and part of the left hindlimb. The paravertebral armour is composed of two rows of paired osteoderms with the lateral margins ventrally deflected and an anterior process for a ‘peg and groove’ articulation. We also compare its dermal armour with that of several Jurassic and Cretaceous neosuchian crocodylomorphs, establishing a detailed description of this type of osteoderms.These features are present in crocodylomorphs with a closed paravertebral armour bracing system. The exceptional 3D conservation of the specimen, and the performance of a micro-CT scan, allowed us to interpret the bracing system of this organism to assess if previous models were accurate. The characters observed in this specimen are congruent with Goniopholididae, a clade of large neosuchians abundant in most semi-aquatic ecosystems from the Jurassic and Early Cretaceous of Laurasia. However, its small size, contrasted with the sizes observed in goniopholidids, left indeterminate whether it could have been a dwarf or juvenile individual. Future histological analyses could shed light on this.}

Schulp, A. S., Mateus O., Polcyn M., Gonçalves A., & Jacobs L. L. (2019).  Angola and its role in the paleobiogeography of Gondwana. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, Program and Abstracts. 188.schulp_et_al_2019_angola_svp_abstract.pdf
Azanza, M. M., Coimbra R., Puértolas-Pascual E., Russo J., Bauluz B., & Mateus O. (2019).  Crystallography of Lourinhanosaurus eggshells (Dinosauria, Theropoda, Allosauroidea). Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, Program and Abstracts. 156-157.moreno_azanza_et_al_2019_svp_abstract.pdf
Hendrickx, C., Mateus O., Araújo R., & Choiniere J. (2019).  The distribution of dental features in non-avian theropod dinosaurs: Taxonomic potential, degree of homoplasy, and major evolutionary trends. Palaeontologia Electronica. 22(3), 1-110. Abstractthe_distribution_of_dental_features_in_non-avian_t.pdfWebsite

Isolated theropod teeth are some of the most common fossils in the dinosaur fossil record and are continually reported in the literature. Recently developed quantitative methods have improved our ability to test the affinities of isolated teeth in a repeatable framework. But in most studies, teeth are diagnosed on qualitative characters. This can be problematic because the distribution of theropod dental characters is still poorly documented, and often restricted to one lineage. To help in the identification of isolated theropod teeth, and to more rigorously evaluate their taxonomic and phylogenetic potential, we evaluated dental features in two ways. We first analyzed the distribution of 34 qualitative dental characters in a broad sample of taxa. Functional properties for each dental feature were included to assess how functional similarity generates homoplasy. We then compiled a quantitative data matrix of 145 dental characters for 97 saurischian taxa. The latter was used to assess the degree of homoplasy of qualitative dental characters, address longstanding questions on the taxonomic and biostratigraphic value of theropod teeth, and explore the major evolutionary trends in the theropod dentition.

In smaller phylogenetic datasets for Theropoda, dental characters exhibit higher levels of homoplasy than non-dental characters, yet they still provide useful grouping information and optimize as local synapomorphies of smaller clades. In broader phylogenetic datasets, the degree of homoplasy displayed by dental and non-dental characters is not significantly different. Dental features on crown ornamentations, enamel texture and tooth microstructure have significantly less homoplasy than other dental features and can be used to identify many theropod taxa to ‘family’ or ‘sub-family’ level, and some taxa to genus or species. These features should, therefore, be a priority for investigations seeking to classify isolated teeth.

Our observations improve the taxonomic utility of theropod teeth and in some cases can help make isolated teeth useful as biostratigraphic markers. This proposed list of dental features in theropods should, therefore, facilitate future studies on the systematic paleontology of isolated teeth.

Mateus, O., Callapez P. M., Polcyn M. J., Schulp A. S., Gonçalves A. O., & Jacobs L. L. (2019).  The Fossil Record of Biodiversity in Angola Through Time: A Paleontological Perspective. (Huntley, Brian J., Russo, Vladimir, Lages, Fernanda, Ferrand, Nuno, Ed.).Biodiversity of Angola: Science & Conservation: A Modern Synthesis. 53–76.: Springer International Publishing Abstractmateus2019_chapter_thefossilrecordofbiodiversityi.pdf

This chapter provides an overview of the alpha paleobiodiversity of Angola based on the available fossil record that is limited to the sedimentary rocks, ranging in age from Precambrian to the present. The geological period with the highest paleobiodiversity in the Angolan fossil record is the Cretaceous, with more than 80{%} of the total known fossil taxa, especially marine molluscs, including ammonites as a majority among them. The vertebrates represent about 15{%} of the known fauna and about one tenth of them are species firstly described based on specimens from Angola.

Belvedere, M., Castanera D., Meyer C. A., Marty D., Mateus O., Silva B. C., Santos V. F., & Cobos A. (2019).  Late Jurassic globetrotters compared: A closer look at large and giant theropod tracks of North Africa and Europe. Journal of African Earth Sciences. 158, 103547. Abstractbelvedere_et_al_2019_jurassic_globetrotters_compared.pdfWebsite

Late Jurassic theropod tracks are very common both in North Africa and Europe. Two recently described ichnotaxa Megalosauripus transjuranicus and Jurabrontes curtedulensis from the Kimmeridgian of Switzerland show the coexistence of two apex predators in the same palaeoenvironment. Similar tracks can be found in tracksites from the Iberian Peninsula and from Morocco. Here, we further explore the similarities among the Swiss ichnotaxa and the other tracks from Germany (Kimmeridgian), Spain (Tithonian-Berriasian), Portugal (Oxfordian-Tithonian) and Morocco (Kimmeridgian) through novel three-dimensional data comparisons. Specimens were grouped in two morphotypes: 1) large and gracile (30 < Foot Length<50 cm) and 2) giant and robust (FL > 50 cm). The analyses show a great morphological overlap among these two morphotypes and the Swiss ichnotaxa (Megalosauripus transjuranicus and Jurabrontes curtedulensis, respectively), even despite the differences in sedimentary environment and age. This suggests a widespread occurrence of similar ichnotaxa along the western margin of Tethys during the Late Jurassic. The new data support the hypothesis of a Gondwana-Laurasia faunal exchange during the Middle or early Late Jurassic, and the presence of migratory routes around the Tethys.

Russo, J., & Mateus O. (2019).  A new Ankylosaur Dinosaur Skeleton from the Upper Jurassic of Portugal. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, Program and Abstracts. 184.russo__mateus_2019_svp_abstract.pdf
Guillaume, A. R., Moreno-Azanza M., & Mateus O. (2019).  New lissamphibian material from the Lourinhã Formation (Late Jurassic, Portugal). Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, Program and Abstracts. 112.guillaume_et_al_2019_svp_abstract.pdf
Rotatori, F., Moreno-Azanza M., & Mateus O. (2019).  New ornithopod dinosaur remains from the Late Jurassic Lourinhã Formation. 17th Conference of the EAVP. 100., Bruxelles: European Association of Vertebrate Paleontologistsrotatori_et_al_2019_ornithopod_portugal_eavp_2019_abstract.pdf
Mateus, O., Callapez P. M., Polcyn M. J., Schulp A. S., Gonçalves A. O., & Jacobs L. L. (2019).  O registo fóssil da biodiversidade em Angola ao longo do tempo: uma perspectiva paleontológica. (Huntley B.J., Russo V., Lages F., Ferrand N., Ed.).Biodiversidade de Angola: Ciência e Conservação - Uma Síntese Moderna. 89-116., Porto: Arte & Ciência Abstractmateus_et_al_2019_paleobiodiversidade_angola.pdf

Este capítulo apresenta uma visão geral da paleobiodiversidade alfa de Angola com base no registo fóssil disponível, o qual se limita às rochas sedimentares, a sua idade variando entre o Pré‑Câmbrico e o pre‑
sente. O período geológico com a maior paleobiodiversidade no registo fóssil angolano é o Cretácico, com mais de 80% do total dos táxones fósseis conhecidos, especialmente moluscos marinhos, sendo estes na sua maioria
amonites. Os vertebrados representam cerca de 15% da fauna conhecida e cerca de um décimo destes são espécies descritas pela primeira vez com base em espécimes de Angola.

Park, J., Lee Y., Currie P. J., Kobayashi Y., Koppelhus E. B., Barsbold R., Lee S., Kim S., & Mateus O. (2019).  Three new skulls of the Late Cretaceous armored dinosaur Talarurus plicatospineus Maleev, 1952. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, Program and Abstracts. 165-166.park_et_al_2019_svp_abstract.pdf
2018
Mateus, O., Pereira B., Rocha R., & Kullberg J. C. (2018).  Aspiring Geopark Oeste in Portugal: scientific highlights and importance. 8th International Conference on UNESCO Global Geoparks. , 8-14 Sept., Adamello Brenta Geopark, Trentinomateus_et_al_2018_geopark_oeste.pdf
Agnolin, F. L., Mateus O., Milàn J., Marzola M., Wings O., Adolfssen J. S., & Clemmensen L. B. (2018).  Ceratodus tunuensis, sp. nov., a new lungfish (Sarcopterygii, Dipnoi) from the Upper Triassic of central East Greenland. Journal of Vertebrate PaleontologyJournal of Vertebrate Paleontology. e1439834., 2018: Taylor & Francis Abstractagnolin_et_al_2018_ceratodus_tunuensis_greenland.pdfWebsite

ABSTRACTThe fossil record of post-Paleozoic lungfishes in Greenland is currently restricted to a few brief reports of isolated and undetermined tooth plates coming from the uppermost Fleming Fjord Formation (late Norian) in Jameson Land, central East Greenland. Here, we describe Ceratodus tunuensis, sp. nov., a new dipnoan from a thin bed of calcareous lake mudstone from the ?rsted Dal Member of the Fleming Fjord Formation. The Ceratodus fossil record indicates that during the Late Triassic, this genus was restricted to the middle latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere. This record matches previous paleobiogeographical analyses and indicates that terrestrial biota during the Late Triassic was strongly influenced by paleolatitude.Citation for this article: Agnolin, F. L., O. Mateus, J. Milàn, M. Marzola, O. Wings, J. Schulz Adolfssen, and L. B. Clemmensen. 2018. Ceratodus tunuensis, sp. nov., a new lungfish (Sarcopterygii, Dipnoi) from the Upper Triassic of central East Greenland. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. DOI: 10.1080/02724634.2018.1439834.

Tschopp, E., Mateus O., & Norell M. (2018).  Complex Overlapping Joints between Facial Bones Allowing Limited Anterior Sliding Movements of the Snout in Diplodocid Sauropods. American Museum NovitatesAmerican Museum Novitates. 1 - 16., 2018: American Museum of Natural History Abstracttschopp_et_al_2018.pdfWebsite

ABSTRACT Diplodocid sauropods had a unique skull morphology, with posteriorly retracted nares, an elongated snout, and anteriorly restricted, peglike teeth. Because of the lack of extant analogs in skull structure and tooth morphology, understanding their feeding strategy and diet has been difficult. Furthermore, the general rarity of sauropod skulls and the fragility of their facial elements resulted in a restricted knowledge of cranial anatomy, in particular regarding the internal surface of the facial skull. Here, we describe in detail a well-preserved diplodocid skull visible in medial view. Diagnostic features recognized in other skulls observable in lateral view, such as the extended contribution of the jugal to the antorbital fenestra, are obliterated in medial view due to extensive overlapping joints between the maxilla, jugal, quadratojugal, and the lacrimal. These overlapping joints permitted limited anterior sliding movement of the snout, which likely served as a kind of ?shock-absorbing? mechanism during feeding. Diplodocid skulls therefore seem to have evolved to alleviate stresses inflicted on the snout during backward movements of the head, as would be expected during branch-stripping or raking.ABSTRACT Diplodocid sauropods had a unique skull morphology, with posteriorly retracted nares, an elongated snout, and anteriorly restricted, peglike teeth. Because of the lack of extant analogs in skull structure and tooth morphology, understanding their feeding strategy and diet has been difficult. Furthermore, the general rarity of sauropod skulls and the fragility of their facial elements resulted in a restricted knowledge of cranial anatomy, in particular regarding the internal surface of the facial skull. Here, we describe in detail a well-preserved diplodocid skull visible in medial view. Diagnostic features recognized in other skulls observable in lateral view, such as the extended contribution of the jugal to the antorbital fenestra, are obliterated in medial view due to extensive overlapping joints between the maxilla, jugal, quadratojugal, and the lacrimal. These overlapping joints permitted limited anterior sliding movement of the snout, which likely served as a kind of ?shock-absorbing? mechanism during feeding. Diplodocid skulls therefore seem to have evolved to alleviate stresses inflicted on the snout during backward movements of the head, as would be expected during branch-stripping or raking.

Marzola, M., Mateus O., & Moreno-Azanza(eds)M. (2018).  Abstract book of the XVI Annual Meeting of the European Association of Vertebrate Palaeontology. XVI Annual Meeting of the European Association of Vertebrate Palaeontologists. , Caparica: Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia da Universidade Nova de Lisboaeavp_2018_abstract_book.pdf
Costa, F., & Mateus O. (2018).  Alcovasaurus longispinus as a dacentrurine stegosaur (Dinosauria) and contributions to the diagnosis of Dacentrurinae. XVI Annual Meeting of the European Association of Vertebrate Palaeontologists. 50.: Abstract book of the XVI Annual Meeting of the European Association of Vertebrate Palaeontologists, Caparica, Portugal June 26th-July 1st, 2018. Abstractcosta__mateus_2018_eavp_abstract.pdf

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Tschopp, E., Brinkman D., Henderson J., Turner M. A., & Mateus O. (2018).  Considerations on the replacement of a type species in the case of the sauropod dinosaur Diplodocus Marsh, 1878. Geology of the Intermountain West. 5, 245-262.tschoppetal2018.pdf
Guillaume, A. R. D., Moreno-Azanza M., Puértolas-Pascual E., & Mateus O. (2018).  Crocodylomorph teeth from the Lourinhã Formation, Portugal (Late Jurassic). XVI Annual Meeting of the European Association of Vertebrate Palaeontologists. 80., Caparica, Portugal June 26th-July 1st, 2018 Abstractguillaume_et_al_2018_eavp_abstract.pdf

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Rotatori, F. M., Moreno-Azanza M., & Mateus O. (2018).  Dryosaurid ornithopods from the Late Jurassic of Portugal: an overview. XVI Annual Meeting of the European Association of Vertebrate Palaeontologists. 166., Caparica, Portugal June 26th-July 1st, 2018: Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia da Universidade Nova de Lisboa Abstractrotatori_et_al_2018_eavp_abstract.pdf

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Campos, H., & Mateus O. (2018).  The first record of placodonts in Portugal and its chronological and paleoecological implications. XVI Annual Meeting of the European Association of Vertebrate Palaeontologists. 38.: Abstract book of the XVI Annual Meeting of the European Association of Vertebrate Palaeontologists, Caparica, Portugal June 26th-July 1st, 2018. Abstractcampos__mateus_2018_eavp_abstract.pdf

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Pereira, T., Mateus O., & Moreno-Azanza M. (2018).  Fossil amphibians from Portugal. 1st Palaeontological Virtual Congress. online. Abstractpereira_et_al_2018_amphibians_portugal.pdf

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Ribeiro, C., Callapez P. M., & Mateus O. (2018).  Fossil vertebrates in the paleontological collections of the Science Museum (University of Coimbra, Portugal). XVI Annual Meeting of the European Association of Vertebrate Palaeontologists. 163., Caparica, Portugal June 26th-July 1st, 2018: Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia da Universidade Nova de Lisboa Abstractribeiro_et_al_2018_eavp_abstract.pdf

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Estraviz López, D., & Mateus O. (2018).  The history of the Quaternary vertebrate paleontology in Portugal. XVI Annual Meeting of the European Association of Vertebrate Palaeontologists. 65., Caparica, Portugal June 26th-July 1st, 2018: Abstract book of the XVI Annual Meeting of the European Association of Vertebrate Palaeontologists, Caparica, Portugal June 26th-July 1st, 2018. Abstractestraviz__mateus_2018_eavp_abstract.pdf

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Puértolas-Pascual, E., Mateus O., & Callapez P. M. (2018).  Implicaciones de la fenestra mandibular externa en el origen de Crocodylia. EJIP Life finds a way. 14-144., Gasteiz, Spainpuertolas-pascual_et_al_2018_ejip.pdf
Tschopp, E., Mateus O., Marzola M., & Norell M. (2018).  Indications for a horny beak and extensive supraorbital connective tissue in diplodocid sauropods. Annual Meeting of the Society of Vertebrate Paleontology. 229.: Society of Vertebrate Paleontologytschopp_et_al_2018_svp_abstract.pdf
Rotatori, F. M., Moreno-Azanza M., & Mateus O. (2018).  Isolated dryosaurid (Dinosauria: Ornithopoda) cranial remains from the Late Jurassic of Portugal. EJIP Life finds a way. 95-98., Gasteiz, Spainrotatori_et_al_2018_ejip.pdf
Cavadas, B., Mestrinho N., & Mateus O. (2018).  Jurassic race: a collaborative pedagogical activity between paleontologists, mathematics and science education teachers. XVI Annual Meeting of the European Association of Vertebrate Palaeontologists. 41., Caparica, Portugal June 26th-July 1st, 2018: Abstract book of the XVI Annual Meeting of the European Association of Vertebrate Palaeontologists, Caparica, Portugal June 26th-July 1st, 2018. Abstractcavadas_et_al_2018_eavp_abstract.pdf

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Mateus, O., & Campos H. (2018).  Loulé há mais de 220 Milhões de anos: os vertebrados fósseis do Algarve triásico. Loulé: Territórios. Memórias. Identidades. 651-659.: Museu Nacional de Arqueologia | Imprensa Nacionalmateus_campos2018_algarve_triasico.pdf
Guillaume, A. R. D., Moreno-Azanza M., & Mateus O. (2018).  Microvertebrates from the Lourinhã Formation (Late Jurassic, Portugal). 1st Palaeontological Virtual Congress. online. Abstractguillaume-et-al_pvc2018_abstract.pdf

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Puértolas-Pascual, E., & Mateus O. (2018).  A new 3D preserved articulated partial skeleton of Neosuchia from the Upper Jurassic of Portugal. XVI Annual Meeting of the European Association of Vertebrate Palaeontologists. 158., Caparica, Portugal June 26th-July 1st, 2018: Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia da Universidade Nova de Lisboa Abstractpuertolas-pascual__mateus_2018_eavp_abstract.pdf

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Estraviz Lopez, D., & Mateus O. (2018).  Paleobiodiversity of Quaternary fossil tetrapods in continental Portugal. 1st Palaeontological Virtual Congress. online. Abstractestraviz-lopez-mateus_palaeovc2018_abstract.pdf

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Sousa, J., & Mateus O. (2018).  A review of Ichthyosauria from Portugal. XVI Annual Meeting of the European Association of Vertebrate Palaeontologists. 179., Caparica, Portugal June 26th-July 1st, 2018 Abstractsousa_e_mateus_2018_eavp_abstract.pdf

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Marzola, M., Mateus O., Milàn J., & Clemmensen L. B. (2018).  A review of Palaeozoic and Mesozoic tetrapods from Greenland. Bulletin of the Geological Society of Denmark. 66, 21–46. Abstractmarzola_et_al_2018_-_review_of_greenlandic_tetrapods.pdf

This article presents a synthesis of Palaeozoic and Mesozoic fossil tetrapods from Greenland, including an updated review of the holotypes and a new photographic record of the main specimens. All fossil tetrapods found are from East Greenland, with at least 30 different known taxa: five stem tetrapods (Acanthostega gunnari, Ichthyostega eigili, I. stensioi, I. watsoni, and Ymeria denticulata) from the Late Devonian of the Aina Dal and Britta Dal Formations; four temnospondyl amphibians (Aquiloniferus kochi, Selenocara groenlandica, Stoschiosaurus nielseni, and Tupilakosaurus heilmani) from the Early Triassic of the Wordie Creek Group; two temnospondyls (Cyclotosaurus naraserluki and Gerrothorax cf. pulcherrimus), one testudinatan (cf. Proganochelys), two stagonolepids (Aetosaurus ferratus and Paratypothorax andressorum), the eudimorphodontid Arcticodactylus, undetermined archosaurs (phytosaurs and both sauropodomorph and theropod dinosaurs), the cynodont Mitredon cromptoni, and three mammals (Haramiyavia clemmenseni, Kuehneotherium, and cf. ?Brachyzostrodon), from the Late Triassic of the Fleming
Fjord Formation; one plesiosaur from the Early Jurassic of the Kap Stewart Formation; one plesiosaur and one ichthyosaur from the Late Jurassic of the Kap Leslie Formation, plus a previously unreported Late Jurassic plesiosaur from Kronprins Christian Land. Moreover, fossil tetrapod trackways are known from the Late Carboniferous (morphotype Limnopus) of the Mesters Vig Formation and at least four different morphologies (such as the crocodylomorph Brachychirotherium, the auropodomorph Eosauropus and Evazoum, and the theropodian Grallator) associated to archosaurian trackmakers are known from the Late Triassic of the Fleming Fjord Formation. The presence of rich fossiliferous tetrapod sites in East Greenland is linked to the presence of well-exposed continental and shallow marine deposits with most finds in terrestrial deposits from the Late Devonian and the Late Triassic.

Muchagata, J., Mateus O., & Prieto R. (2018).  Treasures from the depths: first record of Tusciziphius (fossil beaked whale) from the Azores islands deep waters and the importance of local communities to science. XVI Annual Meeting of the European Association of Vertebrate Palaeontologists. 132., Caparica, Portugal June 26th-July 1st, 2018 Abstractmuchagata_et_al_2018_eavp_abstract.pdf

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2017
Moreno-Azanza, M., Bauluz B., Canudo J. I., & Mateus O. (2017).  The conservative structure of the ornithopod eggshell: electron backscatter diffraction characterization of Guegoolithus turolensis from the Early Cretaceous of Spain. Journal of Iberian Geology. 1-9., 2017 Abstractthe_conservative_structure_of_the_ornithopod_eggshell.pdfWebsite

The Spheroolithidae oospecies Guegoolithus turolensis, putatively attributed to non-hadrosauroid styracosterns was first described in the Barremian of the Iberian Basin, and later reported in the Valanginian–Hauterivian of the Cameros Basin, with both occurrences separated by a few hundred kilometres but by over 10 million years.

Marzola, M., Mateus O., Shubin N. H., & Clemmensen L. B. (2017).  Cyclotosaurus naraserluki, sp. nov., a new Late Triassic cyclotosaurid (Amphibia, Temnospondyli) from the Fleming Fjord Formation of the Jameson Land Basin (East Greenland). Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. e1303501., 2017: Taylor & Francis Abstractmarzola_et_al_2017_cyclotosaurus_greenland.pdfWebsite

ABSTRACTCyclotosaurus naraserluki, sp. nov., is a new Late Triassic capitosaurid amphibian from lacustrine deposits in the Fleming Fjord Formation of the Jameson Land Basin in Greenland. It is based on a fairly complete and well-preserved skull associated with two vertebral intercentra. Previously reported as Cyclotosaurus cf. posthumus, C. naraserluki is unique among cyclotosaurs for having the postorbitals embaying the supratemporals posteromedially. The anterior palatal vacuity presents an autapomorphic complete subdivision by a wide medial premaxillary-vomerine bony connection. The parasphenoid projects between the pterygoids and the exoccipitals, preventing a suture between the two, a primitive condition shared with Rhinesuchidae, Eryosuchus, and Kupferzellia. Within Cyclotosaurus, the Greenlandic skull has a distinctive combination of circular choanae (shared with C. ebrachensis, C. posthumus, and C. robustus) and a convex posteromedial margin of the tabulars (also present in C. ebrachensis and C. intermedius). A phylogenetic analysis indicates that C. naraserluki is the sister taxon of the middle Norian C. mordax from southern Germany, with which it shares a pair of premaxillary foramina. Cyclotosaurus is one of the most successful and diverse genera of Late Triassic temnospondyls, with at least eight species reported from middle Carnian to late Norian. Cyclotosaurus naraserluki is the largest amphibian ever reported from Greenland and one of the Late Triassic vertebrates with the highest northern paleolatitude currently known.http://zoobank.org/urn:lsid:zoobank.org:pub:43AAA541-031C-4EE1-B819-4846EBBD1BBBSUPPLEMENTAL DATA?Supplemental materials are available for this article for free at www.tandfonline.com/UJVPCitation for this article: Marzola, M., O. Mateus, N. H. Shubin, and L. B. Clemmensen. 2017. Cyclotosaurus naraserluki, sp. nov., a new Late Triassic cyclotosaurid (Amphibia, Temnospondyli) from the Fleming Fjord Formation of the Jameson Land Basin (East Greenland). Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. DOI: 10.1080/02724634.2017.1303501.ABSTRACTCyclotosaurus naraserluki, sp. nov., is a new Late Triassic capitosaurid amphibian from lacustrine deposits in the Fleming Fjord Formation of the Jameson Land Basin in Greenland. It is based on a fairly complete and well-preserved skull associated with two vertebral intercentra. Previously reported as Cyclotosaurus cf. posthumus, C. naraserluki is unique among cyclotosaurs for having the postorbitals embaying the supratemporals posteromedially. The anterior palatal vacuity presents an autapomorphic complete subdivision by a wide medial premaxillary-vomerine bony connection. The parasphenoid projects between the pterygoids and the exoccipitals, preventing a suture between the two, a primitive condition shared with Rhinesuchidae, Eryosuchus, and Kupferzellia. Within Cyclotosaurus, the Greenlandic skull has a distinctive combination of circular choanae (shared with C. ebrachensis, C. posthumus, and C. robustus) and a convex posteromedial margin of the tabulars (also present in C. ebrachensis and C. intermedius). A phylogenetic analysis indicates that C. naraserluki is the sister taxon of the middle Norian C. mordax from southern Germany, with which it shares a pair of premaxillary foramina. Cyclotosaurus is one of the most successful and diverse genera of Late Triassic temnospondyls, with at least eight species reported from middle Carnian to late Norian. Cyclotosaurus naraserluki is the largest amphibian ever reported from Greenland and one of the Late Triassic vertebrates with the highest northern paleolatitude currently known.http://zoobank.org/urn:lsid:zoobank.org:pub:43AAA541-031C-4EE1-B819-4846EBBD1BBBSUPPLEMENTAL DATA?Supplemental materials are available for this article for free at www.tandfonline.com/UJVPCitation for this article: Marzola, M., O. Mateus, N. H. Shubin, and L. B. Clemmensen. 2017. Cyclotosaurus naraserluki, sp. nov., a new Late Triassic cyclotosaurid (Amphibia, Temnospondyli) from the Fleming Fjord Formation of the Jameson Land Basin (East Greenland). Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. DOI: 10.1080/02724634.2017.1303501.

Russo, J., Mateus O., Marzola M., & Balbino A. (2017).  Two new ootaxa from the late Jurassic: The oldest record of crocodylomorph eggs, from the Lourinhã Formation, Portugal. PLOS ONE. 12, 1-23., 03, Number 3: Public Library of Science Abstractrusso_et_al_2017_two_new_ootaxa.pdfWebsite

The Late Jurassic Lourinhã Formation is known for its abundant remains of dinosaurs, crocodylomorphs and other vertebrates. Among this record are nine localities that have produced either dinosaur embryos, eggs or eggshell fragments. Herein, we describe and identify the first crocodiloid morphotype eggs and eggshells from the Lourinhã Formation, from five occurrences. One clutch from Cambelas, composed of 13 eggs, eggshell fragments from Casal da Rola and Peralta, one crushed egg and eggshells from Paimogo North, and four crushed eggs as well as eggshell fragments from Paimogo South. We observed and confirmed diagnostic morphological characters for crocodiloid eggshells and which are consistent with a crocodylomorph affinity, such as the ellipsoidal shape, wedge-shaped shell units, triangular extinction under cross-polarized light, and tabular ultrastructure. This material is distinctive enough to propose two new ootaxa within the oofamily Krokolithidae, Suchoolithus portucalensis, oogen. and oosp. nov., for the material from Cambelas, the most complete clutch known for crocodiloid eggs, and Krokolithes dinophilus, oosp. nov., for the remaining material. These are the oldest crocodylomorph eggs known, extending the fossil record for this group to the Late Jurassic. Furthermore, except for the clutch from Cambelas, the material was found with theropod eggs and nests, in the other four occurrences, which seem to suggest some form of biological relationship, still unclear at this point.

Marzola, M., Mateus O., Milàn J., & Clemmensen L. B. (2017).  The 2016 Dinosaur Expedition to the Late Triassic of the Jameson Land Basin, East Greenland. Abstract book of the XV Encuentro de Jóvenes Investigadores en Paleontología/XV Encontro de Jovenes Investigadores em Paleontologia, Pombal, 428 pp.. 249–253. Abstract08._ejip_2017_-_marzola_et_al._2017._the_2016_dinosaur_expedition_to_the_late_triassic_of_the_jameson_land_basin_east_greenland.pdf

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Mateus, O., Marzola M., Schulp A. S., Jacobs L. L., Polcyn M. J., Pervov V., Gonçalves A. O., & Morais M. L. (2017).  Angolan ichnosite in a diamond mine shows the presence of a large terrestrial mammaliamorph, a crocodylomorph, and sauropod dinosaurs in the Early Cretaceous of Africa. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology. 471, 220 - 232. Abstractmateus_et_al_2017_angolan_ichnosite_catoca.pdfWebsite

Abstract We report here new and the first mammaliamorph tracks from the Early Cretaceous of Africa. The tracksite, that also bears crocodylomorph and sauropod dinosaurian tracks, is in the Catoca diamond mine, Lunda Sul Province, Angola. The mammaliamorph tracks have a unique morphology, attributed to Catocapes angolanus ichnogen. et ichnosp. nov. and present an anterolateral projection of digit I and V. The tracks with an average length of 2.7 cm and width of 3.2 cm are the largest mammaliamorph tracks known from the Early Cretaceous unmatched in size in the skeletal fossil record. The crocodylomorph trackways and tracks are attributed to Angolaichnus adamanticus ichnogen. et ichnosp. nov. (‘ichnofamily’ Batrachopodidae) and present a functionally pentadactyl pes, an extremely outwardly rotated handprint, and an unusual tetradactyl and plantigrade manus. One medium-sized sauropod dinosaur trackway preserved skin impressions of a trackmaker with stride length of 1.6 m; a second is that of a small-sized sauropod trackmaker with a pace length of 75 cm.

Waskow, K., & Mateus O. (2017).  Dorsal rib histology of dinosaurs and a crocodylomorph from western Portugal: Skeletochronological implications on age determination and life history traits. Comptes Rendus Palevol. 16, 425-439. Abstractwaskowmateus2017_histology.pdfWebsite

Abstract Bone histology is an important tool for uncovering life history traits of extinct animals, particularly those that lack modern analogs, such as the non-avian dinosaurs. In most studies, histological analyses preferentially focus on long bones for understanding growth rates and determining age. Here we show, by analyzing ornithischians (a stegosaur and an ornithopod), saurischians (a sauropod and a theropod), and a crocodile, rib histology is a suitable alternative. The estimated age for all sampled taxa ranges between 14 to 17 years for Lourinhanosaurus antunesi and 27 to 31 years estimated for Draconyx loureiroi. The theropod Baryonyx was skeletally mature around 23–25 years of age but showed unfused neurocentral sutures, a paedomorphic feature possibly related to aquatic locomotion. Our results show that ribs can contain a nearly complete growth record, and reveal important information about individual age, point of sexual maturity, and, in some cases, sex. Because ribs are more available than long bones, this method opens new possibilities for studying rare and incomplete fossils, including holotypes.

Marzola, M., Mateus O., Milàn J., & Clemmensen L. B. (2017).  European affinities of the Late Triassic biota from Greenland are related to paleolatitude. 15th Annual Meeting of the European Association of Vertebrate Palaeontologists. 91, 61.: Zitteliana Abstract09._eavp_2017_-_marzola_et_al._2017._european_affinities_of_the_late_triassic_biota_from_greenland_are_related_to_paleolatitude.pdf

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