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2006
Sander, P. M., Mateus O., Laven T., & Knotschke N. (2006).  Bone histology indicates insular dwarfism in a new Late Jurassic sauropod dinosaur. Nature. 441, 739-741., Jan Abstractsander_mateus_et_al_2006_europasaurus_sauropod_histology_drwarfism_nature.pdf

Sauropod dinosaurs were the largest animals ever to inhabit the land, with truly gigantic forms in at least three lineages1, 2, 3. Small species with an adult body mass less than five tonnes are very rare4, 5, and small sauropod bones generally represent juveniles. Here we describe a new diminutive species of basal macronarian sauropod, Europasaurus holgeri gen. et sp. nov., and on the basis of bone histology we show it to have been a dwarf species. The fossils, including excellent skull material, come from Kimmeridgian marine beds of northern Germany6, 7, and record more than 11 individuals of sauropods 1.7 to 6.2 m in total body length. Morphological overlap between partial skeletons and isolated bones links all material to the same new taxon. Cortical histology of femora and tibiae indicates that size differences within the specimens are due to different ontogenetic stages, from juveniles to fully grown individuals. The little dinosaurs must have lived on one of the large islands around the Lower Saxony basin8. Comparison with the long-bone histology of large-bodied sauropods suggests that the island dwarf species evolved through a decrease in growth rate from its larger ancestor.

Mateus, O., Morais M., Schulp A., Jacobs L., & Polcyn M. (2006).  The Cretaceous of Angola. JOURNAL OF VERTEBRATE PALEONTOLOGY. 26, 96A-97A., Jan Abstractmateus_et_al_2006_svp_abstracts_cretaceous_fo_angola.pdf

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Schulp, A., Mateus O., Polcyn M., & Jacobs L. (2006).  A new Prognathodon (Squamata : Mosasauridae) from the Cretaceous of Angola. JOURNAL OF VERTEBRATE PALEONTOLOGY. 26, 122A-122A., Jan Abstractschulp_et_al_2006.pdf

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Mateus, O. (2006).  The European Enigmatic Dinosaur Evolution [in Japanese]. The Gigantic dinosaur Expo 2006 (catalogue). 69-71.mateus_2006_european.pdf
Mateus, O., Walen A., & Antunes M. T. (2006).  The large theropod fauna of the Lourinhã Formation (Portugal) and its similarity to the Morrison Formation, with a description of a new species of Allosaurus. New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science Bulletin. 36, 123-129. Abstractmateus_walen_antunes_-_2006_-_the_large_theropod_fauna_of_the_lourinha_formation__portugal__and_its_similarity_to_the_morrison_formation__with_a_description_of_a_new_species_of_allosaurus.pdf

Late Jurassic theropod dinosaurs have been known in Portugal since 1863 but only now are they being fully understood, with the recognition of genera such as Allosaurus, Aviatyrannis, Ceratosaurus, Lourinhanosaurus, and Torvosaurus from the Lourinhã and Alcobaça Formations (Kimmeridgian/Tithonian). Ceratosaurus dentisulcatus can now be reported from Portugal. It represents the only occurrence of this species outside the Morrison Formation.
New cranial elements confirm the presence of Torvosaurus tanneri, in Portugal. Torvosaurus was the largest Late Jurassic land carnivore. New postcranial and cranial elements allow the erection of a new species from Portugal, Allosaurus europaeus n.sp. The theropod assemblage of Portugal is similar to that of the Morrison Formation.

Schulp, A. S., Polcyn M. J., Mateus O., Jacobs L. L., Morais L. M., & Tavares T. S. (2006).  New mosasaur material from the Maastrichtian of Angola, with notes on the phylogeny, distribution and palaeoecology of the genus Prognathodon. Publicaties van het Natuurhistorisch Genootschap in Limburg Reeks XLV aflevering 1. Stichting Natuurpublicaties Limburg, Maastricht . 57-67 .schulp_polcyn_mateus_jacobs_et_al_2006_new_mosasaur_material_from_the_maastrichtian_of_angola_with_notes_on_the_phylogeny_distribution_and_palaeoecology_of_the_genus_prognathodon.pdf
Jacobs, L. L., Mateus O., Polcyn M. J., Schulp A. S., Antunes M. T., Morais M. L., & da Silva Tavares T. (2006).  The occurrence and geological setting of Cretaceous dinosaurs, mosasaurs, plesiosaurs, and turtles from Angola. Paleont. Soc. Korea. 22(1), 91-110. Abstractjacobs_mateus-et_al_2006_angola.pdf

Vertebrate-bearing fossiliferous outcrops of Cretaceous age in sub-Saharan Africa are rare because of younger superficial deposits, vegetation cover, and the widespread occurrence of Precambrian metamorphic plateau basement comprising much of the continent. However, one area of extensive marine and nonmarine
Cretaceous exposures is found between the plateau and the coast in Angola. The Angolan margin was formed in conjunction with the breakup of Gondwana and subsequent growth of the South Atlantic. Cretaceous deposits are constrained in age by the emplacement of oceanic crust, which began no later than magnetozone M3
(approximately 128 Ma, Barremian). Shallow marine facies are exposed in sea cliffs but equivalent facies become increasingly terrestrial inland. Few vertebrate fossils have been described from Angola aside from sharks.
Notable exceptions are the late Turonian mosasaurs Angolasaurus bocagei and Tylosaurus iembeensis from northern Angola. Those taxa are significant because they are among the earliest derived mosasaurs. Recent field work led to the discovery of a new skull of Angolasaursus as well as sharks, fish, plesiosaurs, the skull of a new taxon of turtle, additional mosasaurs, and the articulated forelimb of a sauropod dinosaur, the first reported dinosaur from Angola. In southern Angola, marine sediments spanning the Cretaceous-Paleogene boundary are found.

Castanhinha, R., & Mateus O. (2006).  On the left-right asymmetry in dinosaurs. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 26(Suppl. To 3), 48A. Abstractcastanhinhamateus2006.pdf

The study of different kinds of morphological left-right (L-R) asymmetries in all taxa is a very powerful tool to understand evolution since it is a way to measure the developmentalstability of an organism against environmental perturbations. Excluding every pathologic or subtle asymmetry and all cases of taphonomic distortion, this work focuses only on two
kinds of unambiguous asymmetries: fluctuating and adaptative asymmetry. There are several cases of conspicuous left-right asymmetry in dinosaurs and is probably more common than previously thought. The pneumatic cavities systems in skull and vertebrae of theropodsand sauropods are the most common cases reported. The shape (but not the occurrence) of pneumatic cavities might have been exposed to weak selective pressure becoming more random than other body structures. Asymmetries are rarer in the appendicular bones possibly because it represents a strong handicap in the function of the limbs, consequently in the locomotion of the individual. Teeth counting show many exceptions to the typical L-R symmetry. Peculiar cases of adaptive asymmetry are related with the plates of stegosaurs and the ear displacement in the skull of the troodontids, which may have an important role in the physiology and ecology of the animals. The asymmetric displacement maximizes the surface exposure of the stegosaurs dorsal plates. This is an advantage, either the plates were used for thermoregulation, display or specific identification. Work in progress on the braincases of some troodontids specimens shows asymmetric ear openings, which suggests thatcan be an analogy resulting from convergent evolution between troodontids and strigiformes birds, used for 3D directional acoustics. Asymmetries are more common in animals that develop under stress. Animals that lived under dramatic environmental changes periods—like mass-extinctions episodes are believed to be—should present more asymmetries.
However, much more sampling and time accuracy is required in order to be able to relate dinosaur asymmetries to extinction episodes. Asymmetries show strong intra-individual variation and should be taken in consideration in taxonomical studies.

Sander, P. M., Mateus O., Laven T., & Knötschke N. (2006).  Bone histology indicates insular dwarfism in a new Late Jurassic sauropod dinosaur. Nature. 441, 739-741. Abstract
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Martin Sander, P., Mateus O., Laven T., & Knötschke N. (2006).  Bone histology indicates insular dwarfism in a new Late Jurassic sauropod dinosaur. Nature. 441, 739-741., Number 7094 Abstract
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Mateus, O., Morais M. L., Schulp A. S., Jacobs L. L., & Polcyn M. J. (2006).  The Cretaceous of Angola. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 26, 96-97., Number (Suppl. To 3) Abstract
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Mateus, O., Morais M. L., Schulp A. S., Jacobs L. L., & Polcyn M. J. (2006).  The Cretaceous of Angola. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 26, 96–97., Number (Suppl. T Abstract
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Mateus, O., & The Gigantic dinosaur E. (2006).  The European Enigmatic Dinosaur Evolution (in Japanese). Abstract
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Mateus, O., Walen A., & Antunes M. T. (2006).  The large theropod fauna of the Lourinhã Formation (Portugal) and its similarity to that of the Morrison Formation, with a description of new species of Allosaurus. New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science Bulletin. 36, , Number 123-129 Abstract
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Schulp, A. S., Polcyn M. J., Mateus O., Jacobs L. L., Morais M. L., & Tavares T. S. (2006).  New mosasaur material from the Maastrichtian of Angola, with notes on the phylogeny, distribution and palaeoecology of the genus Prognathodon. Publicaties van het Natuurhistorisch Genootschap in Limburg Reeks XLV aflevering 1. Stichting Natuurpublicaties Limburg, Maastricht. 57-67. Abstract
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Jacobs, L. L., Mateus O., Polcyn M. J., Schulp A. S., Antunes M. T., Morais M. L., & Tavares T. S. (2006).  The occurrence and geological setting of Cretaceous dinosaurs, mosasaurs, plesiosaurs, and turtles from Angola. Journal of the Paleontological Society of Korea. 22, , Number 1 Abstract
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Jacobs, L. L., Mateus O., Polcyn M. J., Schulp A. S., Antunes M. T., Morais M. L., & da Silva Tavares T. (2006).  The occurrence and geological setting of Cretaceous dinosaurs, mosasaurs, plesiosaurs, and turtles from Angola. JOURNAL-PALEONTOLOGICAL SOCIETY OF KOREA. 22, 91–91., Number 1 Abstract
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Castanhinha, R., & Mateus O. (2006).  On the left-right asymmetry in dinosaurs. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 26 (Suppl. To 3): 48A.. 26, 48., Number Suppl. to 3 Abstract
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Castanhinha, R., & Mateus O. (2006).  On the left-right asymmetry in dinosaurs. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 26 (Suppl. To 3): 48A.. 26, 48–48., Number Suppl. to Abstract
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Jacobs, L. L., Morais M. L., Schulp A. S., Mateus O., & Polcyn M. J. (2006).  Systematic Position and Geological Context of Angolasaurus (Mosasauridae) and a New Sea Turtle from the Cretaceous of Angola. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 26 (Suppl. To 3). 81. Abstract
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2005
Mateus, O. (2005).  Dinossauros do Jurássico Superior de Portugal, com destaque para os saurísquios. Universidade Nova de Lisboa. , Lisboa
Mateus, O., & Milan J. (2005).  Ichnological evidence for giant ornithopod dinosaurs in the Late Jurassic Lourinhã Formation, Portugal.. Abstract Book of the International Symposium on Dinosaurs and Other Vertebrates Palaeoichnology. 60., Fumanya, Barcelona Abstractmateus__milan_2005_footprint.pdf

The Late Jurassic Lourinhã Formation contains a diverse dinosaur fauna comprising theropods, sauropods, stegosaurs, ankylosaurs and several genera of ornithopods.
The sedimentology in the area favours preservation of footprints, and footprints from most of the dinosaurs represented by skeletal remains are present in the area. During fieldwork in the summer of 2003 a new, large, tridactyl footprint was found at the beach of Vale Frades, approximately 6 km north of Lourinhã, Portugal. The footprint was found together with a stegosaur footprint on a clay bed exposed within the tidal zone. The footprints were preserved as sandstone casts standing on a pedestal of clay. This unusual type of preservation is the result of the footprints having first been emplaced in clay, and then filled with sand. During the present day erosion from the sea, the harder sandstone cast of the footprints protects the subjacent clay layers from erosion. Owing to the immediate danger of erosion of, the footprint was collected and is now on display at Museu da Lourinhã (ML 1000). The footprint is 70 cm long and 69 cm wide, the toes are short and broad, with indications of short blunt claws. The

divarication angle between the outer digits is close to 90 degrees. The dimensions and general

morphology of the footprint identifies it as deriving from an ornithopod dinosaur with an estimated hip height of 4.13 metres. Although very large ornithopods are known from the Cretaceous, the largest known Jurassic ornithopod is Camptosaurus from USA, and the largest known from Portugal is the camptosaurid Draconyx loureiroi. Neither of these reached the body size suggested by the new footprint. So far the footprint described herein is s the only evidence for a Jurassic ornithopod of that size.

Milan, J., Christiansen P., & Mateus O. (2005).  A three-dimensionally preserved sauropod manus impression from the Upper Jurassic of Portugal: Implications for sauropod manus shape and locomotor mechanics. Kaupia. 14, 47-52. Abstractmilan_et_al_mateus_2005_-_3d_sauropod_manus_track_l_j_portugal.pdfWebsite

Sauropods were the largest animals ever to walk the earth, and evolved several specializations in their limbs in order to support their body mass. Their legs became columnar and their manual digits became reduced and encapsulated in tissue to form a single weight-bearing unit in the derived sauropods. A new three-dimensionally preserved cast of a sauropod manus, found in the Upper Jurassic Lourinhã Formation, Portugal, demonstrates not only the shape, but also the actual movements of the sauropod manus during the stride. The manus cast is 32 cm deep, and show the manus to be hoof-shaped and lacking any impressions of individual digits, except for digit I, the pollex. Well preserved striations from skin on the sides of the cast show that the manus was covered in rough, tubercular skin. The width of the manus cast is consistent from top to bottom, demonstrating that the manus was brought down and lifted vertically before any parasaggital movement of the upper limb took place.

Mateus, O., & Milan J. (2005).  Ichnological evidence for giant ornithopod dinosaurs in the Late Jurassic Lourinhã Formation, Portugal. Abstract Book of the International Symposium on Dinosaurs and Other Vertebrates Palaeoichnology. 60., Fumanya, Barcelona Abstract
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Mateus, O., & Milan J. (2005).  Ichnological evidence for giant ornithopod dinosaurs in the Late Jurassic Lourinhã Formation, Portugal. Abstract Book of the International Symposium on Dinosaurs and Other Vertebrates Palaeoichnology. 60–60., Fumanya, Barcelona Abstract
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Milan, J., & Mateus O. (2005).  Jagten på Europas største dinosaur.. Naturens Verden. 88(10), 2-13.. AbstractWebsite

[In danish. Title translation: The hunt for the biggest dinosaur in Europe]

Milan, J., & Mateus O. (2005).   Jagten på Europas største dinosaur. Naturens Verden. 88(10), 2-13. Abstract
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2004
Mateus, O., Laven T., & Knotschke N. (2004).  A dwarf between giants? A new late Jurassic sauropod from Germany. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 23, 90A., Number suppl. to 3mateus_et_al_2004_a_dwarf_between_giants-_a_new_late_jurassic_sauropod_from_germany_svp.pdfWebsite
Cunha, P. P., Mateus O., & Antunes M. T. (2004).  The sedimentology of the Paimogo dinosaur nest site (Portugal, Upper Jurassic). 23 rd IAS Meeting of Sedimentology. 93., Coimbra, Portugal Abstractcunha_p_p_2004_-_the_sedimentology_of_the_paimogo_dinosaur_nest_site_portugal10467.pdf

Sedimentological features of the Paimogo site, 6 km NNW of Lourinhã, western central Portugal are presented. More than one hundred theropod dinosaur eggs (some containing embryo bones) ascribed to Lourinhanosaurus antunesi Mateus 1998, three crocodilian eggs and some other fossils were found at the 32 m2 excavated area of the egg-bearing horizon (Mateus et al., 1998). The stratigraphic position of the site is the Praia Azul member (Lourinhã Formation), roughly corresponding to the Kimmeridgian-Tithonian boundary or, more likely lowermost Tithonian. The maximum flooding surface of the basinal transgressive event where the horizon is located corresponds to the base of the H depositional sequence defined by Pena dos Reis et al. (2000) and probably correlates to the base of sequence Ti1 identified within western European basins (Jacquin et al., 1998), dated as 150 Ma. Possibly during the normal river discharge, the theropods congregated in nesting colonies at the backswamp of an extensive flood plain with small meandering channels and freshwater ponds. There are no evidences that the nest was dug or the eggs buried. The eggs have probably been laid on a flat, shaded, muddy area near the bank of a large pond. It is probable that the eggs have not been actively incubated. The larger number of eggs suggest that they were laid near simultaneously by, at least, six females. The fossil record shows that crocodilians, mammals, gastropods and fish were also present. A flood event occurred when theropod embryos had attained a late stade of ontogenetic development, probably just before hatching. The overflow from a nearby channel flooded the plain, including the area where the eggs had been laid. The sheet flood flowing over the nest resulted into the scattering and breaking up of some dinosaur eggs. Eggshell and embryos skeletal parts fragments were displaced to an adjacent area where, due to hydrodynamic decline, the flow submerged other clutches and moderately dragged their eggs. The flooding caused the drowning of the embryos and covered the eggs with fine-grained sediment, hiding them from predators and scavengers. Hydrodynamic interpretation of the arrangement of the theropod eggs and egg-fragments suggests that the flow came from the NW. When the floodwaters receded, the fine-grained deposits became exposed to subaerial weathering. Although the sediment surface was often wet and small bodies of standing water may still have existed, the sediments were oxidized and plant remains have consequently been destroyed. Some carbonate cementation and redenning resulted from pedogenesis under alternating dry and moist conditions, in a semiarid/ sub-tropical climate under seasonal changing, contrasting conditions. The thick, stratigraphically above and below the nesting horizon mudrocks indicate a long persistence of periodic flooding, alternating with pedogenesis. During the early stages of diagenesis, vertical pressure crushed the eggs. Silt penetration into the inner part of each egg inhibited later flattening during the burial process.

Mateus, O., Laven T., & Knotschke N. (2004).  A dwarf between giants?: A new late Jurassic sauropod from Germany. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 23, 90., Number suppl. to 3 Abstract
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Mateus, O., Laven T., & Knotschke N. (2004).  A dwarf between giants?: A new late Jurassic sauropod from Germany. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 23, 90–90., Number suppl. to Abstract
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Sander, M., Laven T., Mateus O., & Knotschke N. (2004).  Insular dwarfism in a brachiosaurid sauropod from the Upper Jurassic of Germany. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 23, 108., Number Suppl. to 3 Abstract
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Sander, M., Laven T., Mateus O., & Knotschke N. (2004).  Insular dwarfism in a brachiosaurid sauropod from the Upper Jurassic of Germany. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 23, 108–108., Number Suppl. to Abstract
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Cunha, P. P., Mateus O., & Antunes M. T. (2004).  The sedimentology of the Paimogo dinosaur nest site (Portugal, Upper Jurassic). 23 rd IAS Meeting of Sedimentology. 93., Coimbra, Portugal Abstract
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Cunha, P. P., Mateus O., & Antunes M. T. (2004).  The sedimentology of the Paimogo dinosaur nest site (Portugal, Upper Jurassic). 23 rd IAS Meeting of Sedimentology. 93–93., Coimbra, Portugal Abstract
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2003
Antunes, M. T., & Mateus O. (2003).  Dinosaurs of Portugal. Comptes Rendus Palevol. 2, 77–95., jan, Number 1: Elsevier {BV} AbstractWebsite
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Antunes, M. T., & Mateus O. (2003).  Dinosaurs of Portugal. Comptes Rendus Palevol. 2, 77-95., Number 1 Abstractantunes_mateus_2003_dinosaurs_of_portugal.pdfWebsite

A synthesis on the state of art on dinosaur knowledge in Portugal is presented. The following genera have been recognized: Ceratosaurus, Torvosaurus, Lourinhanosaurus, Allosaurus, cf. Compsognathus, Stokesosaurus, cf. Richardoestesia, cf. Archaeopteryx, Euronychodon, cf. Paronychodon, Dinheirosaurus, Lourinhasaurus, Lusotitan, cf. Pleurocoelus, Lusitanosaurus, Dacentrurus, Dracopelta, Phyllodon, Hypsilophodon, Alocodon, Trimucrodon, Draconyx, Iguanodon, and Taveirosaurus. Most are from Late Jurassic localities at the Lourinhã area and Guimarota. A new genus, Lusotitan, is here raised to include the Late Jurassic ‘Brachiosaurus’ atalaiensis. Lower Cretaceous until Cenomanian material is scarce, except for dinosaur footprints. An interesting Late-Cretaceous, mostly small dinosaur association has been collected between Aveiro and Taveiro.

Mateus, O., & Antunes M. T. (2003).  A New Dinosaur Tracksite in the Lower Cretaceous of Portugal. Ciências da Terra. 15, 253-262. Abstractmateus__antunes_2003-_early_k_dino_tracks_portugal.pdfWebsite

A new Lower Cretaceous (Aptian-Albian) dinosaur tracksite at the Olhos de Água beach is described. It is the first vertebrate fossil finding ever found in the concerned unit, and yielded 128 tracks in 17 trackways within an area of ca. 80 square metres.
Three tridactyl footprint morphotypes have been recognized: - Type 1 (“Iguanodontipus-like”) - trackways D, F, K, J and P; - Type 2 (large theropod), although larger in size, typically from a Grallator-like theropod footprint, i.e. A, B, G, H and O trackways; - Type 3 (medium size theropod); M is the only track of this type. There are other, poorly preserved, unidentified trackways. The theropod, swinging trackway B was produced by an animal that was limping. The theropod track M starts eastwards but drastically changes westwards, speeding up at the same time; this dinosaur decided to turn around and run in the opposite direction.
This site shows three main trackway directions: to the South, to the East, and westwards. Except for the trackway O, large theropods A, B, G and H walked southwards. Perpendicularly to these, ornithopods, small theropods and unidentified trackmakers walked towards East (5) and West (7). The segregation of trackmakers and directions, with large theropod trackways southwards and other dinosaurs’ west or eastwards, may mean that large theropods patrolled a walkway area to an important resource, most probably water, often frequented by ornithopods and smaller theropods. There is no evidence of social behavior or gregarism: footprints’ overposition shows that the large, southwards walking theropods passed on different occasions. Three trackway sequences can be established by chronologic order.

Milàn, J., & Mateus O. (2003).  Fra strandbred til museum p{\aa} syv dage: historien om et gigantisk dinosaur fodspor. Varv. 8–14., Number 2003/3 Abstract
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Mateus, O., & Antunes M. T. (2003).  A new dinosaur tracksite in the Lower Cretaceous of Portugal. Ciências da Terra (UNL). 15, 253–262. Abstract
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2002
Mateus, O., & Jacinto J. J. (2002).  Contribuição para o estudo de Hemidactylus turcicus (Reptilia, Gekkonidae): ritmos de actividade e microhabitat em Évora, Portugal. VII Congresso Luso-Espanhol de Herpetologia. 136., Évora Abstract

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