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Mateus, O., & Antunes M. T. (2008).  Landmarks in the history of dinosaur paleontology in Portugal, focusing on skeletal remains. Abstract volume, Dinosaurs - A Historical Perspective, 6-7 may 2008. , London Abstract
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Mateus, O., Callapez {P. M. }, & Puértolas-Pascual E. (2017).  The oldest Crocodylia? a new eusuchian from the Late Cretaceous (Cenomanian) of Portugal. 160. Abstract
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Mateus, O., & Milan J. (2005).  Ichnological evidence for giant ornithopod dinosaurs in the Late Jurassic Lourinhã Formation, Portugal.. Abstract Book of the International Symposium on Dinosaurs and Other Vertebrates Palaeoichnology. 60., Fumanya, Barcelona Abstractmateus__milan_2005_footprint.pdf

The Late Jurassic Lourinhã Formation contains a diverse dinosaur fauna comprising theropods, sauropods, stegosaurs, ankylosaurs and several genera of ornithopods.
The sedimentology in the area favours preservation of footprints, and footprints from most of the dinosaurs represented by skeletal remains are present in the area. During fieldwork in the summer of 2003 a new, large, tridactyl footprint was found at the beach of Vale Frades, approximately 6 km north of Lourinhã, Portugal. The footprint was found together with a stegosaur footprint on a clay bed exposed within the tidal zone. The footprints were preserved as sandstone casts standing on a pedestal of clay. This unusual type of preservation is the result of the footprints having first been emplaced in clay, and then filled with sand. During the present day erosion from the sea, the harder sandstone cast of the footprints protects the subjacent clay layers from erosion. Owing to the immediate danger of erosion of, the footprint was collected and is now on display at Museu da Lourinhã (ML 1000). The footprint is 70 cm long and 69 cm wide, the toes are short and broad, with indications of short blunt claws. The

divarication angle between the outer digits is close to 90 degrees. The dimensions and general

morphology of the footprint identifies it as deriving from an ornithopod dinosaur with an estimated hip height of 4.13 metres. Although very large ornithopods are known from the Cretaceous, the largest known Jurassic ornithopod is Camptosaurus from USA, and the largest known from Portugal is the camptosaurid Draconyx loureiroi. Neither of these reached the body size suggested by the new footprint. So far the footprint described herein is s the only evidence for a Jurassic ornithopod of that size.

Mateus, O. (2016).  Exemplos bizarros de evolução em dinossauros e alguns casos portugueses. Do Big Bang ao Homem. 81-95., Porto Abstract
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Mateus, O. (1999).  Upper Jurassic dinosaurs of Lourinhã (Portugal). Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 19(Suppl. to 3), 62A., Number (Suppl. to 3)mateus_1999_upper_jurassic_lourinha_portugal_svp_1999_abstracts.pdfWebsite
Mateus, O., Morais M. L., Schulp A. S., Jacobs L. L., & Polcyn M. J. (2006).  The Cretaceous of Angola. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 26, 96–97., Number (Suppl. T Abstract
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Mateus, O., & Milan J. (2008).  Sauropod forelimb flexibility deduced from deep manus tracks. 52th Paleontological Association Annual Meeting. 18th-21st December 2008,. 67-68.: University of Glasgow Abstractmateus__milan_2008_palass_sauropod_forelimb_flexibility_deduced_from_deep_manus_tracks.pdf

Sauropods are often considered to have very limited mobility and reduced limb flexibility, mainly due to their giant size and consequent weight. In the Upper Jurassic Lourinhã Formation, central-west Portugal, deep vertical natural casts of sauropod manus tracks are often preserved as the infills of the original tracks. These manus tracks are vertical-walled, with marks of the striations of the skin scales, showing that the movement of the sauropod manus impacting and exiting the mud was totally vertical with no horizontal component of the stride. Some tracks are up to 66 cm deep, which is equivalent to the height of whole sauropod manus. This means that sauropods could lift their anterior feet in a complete vertical manner. Such movement is only possible if there is mobility at elbow and shoulder articulations in a higher degree than previously thought for sauropods. Our vision of sauropod limbs as inflexible columns has to be updated to a more dynamic model for limbs and body.

Mateus, O., Marzola M., Schulp A. S., Jacobs L. L., Polcyn M. J., Pervov V., Gonçalves A. O., & Morais M. L. (2017).  Angolan ichnosite in a diamond mine shows the presence of a large terrestrial mammaliamorph, a crocodylomorph, and sauropod dinosaurs in the Early Cretaceous of Africa. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology. 471, 220 - 232. Abstractmateus_et_al_2017_angolan_ichnosite_catoca.pdfWebsite

Abstract We report here new and the first mammaliamorph tracks from the Early Cretaceous of Africa. The tracksite, that also bears crocodylomorph and sauropod dinosaurian tracks, is in the Catoca diamond mine, Lunda Sul Province, Angola. The mammaliamorph tracks have a unique morphology, attributed to Catocapes angolanus ichnogen. et ichnosp. nov. and present an anterolateral projection of digit I and V. The tracks with an average length of 2.7 cm and width of 3.2 cm are the largest mammaliamorph tracks known from the Early Cretaceous unmatched in size in the skeletal fossil record. The crocodylomorph trackways and tracks are attributed to Angolaichnus adamanticus ichnogen. et ichnosp. nov. (‘ichnofamily’ Batrachopodidae) and present a functionally pentadactyl pes, an extremely outwardly rotated handprint, and an unusual tetradactyl and plantigrade manus. One medium-sized sauropod dinosaur trackway preserved skin impressions of a trackmaker with stride length of 1.6 m; a second is that of a small-sized sauropod trackmaker with a pace length of 75 cm.

Mateus, O. (2009).  Preparation techniques applied to a stegosaurian Dinosaur from Portugal. Journal of Paleontological Techniques. 5, 1–24., 1, Number NA Abstract
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Mateus, O. (1996).  Situação populacional de Hemidactylus turcicus em Évora-Portugal. Actas do IV Congresso Luso-Espanhol de Herpetologia. 45., Porto Abstract
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Mateus, O., Marzola M., Schulp A. S., Jacobs L. L., Polcyn M. J., Pervov V., Gonçalves A. O. {\'ı}mpio, & Morais M. L. (2017).  Angolan ichnosite in a diamond mine shows the presence of a large terrestrial mammaliamorph, a crocodylomorph, and sauropod dinosaurs in the Early Cretaceous of Africa. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology. 471, 220–232., apr: Elsevier {BV} AbstractWebsite
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Mateus, O., Dyke G., Motchurova-Dekova N., Ivanov P., & Kamenov G. D. (2010).  The first record of a dinosaur from Bulgaria. Lethaia. 43, 88-94., Jan Abstractmateus_et_al__2010_the_first_record_of_a_dinosaur_in_bulgaria._lethaia.pdfWebsite

A portion of a left humerus from the Upper Maastrichtian of Vratsa district (NW Bulgaria)
is shown to be from a non-avian theropod dinosaur: this is the first record of a
dinosaur from Bulgaria. We describe this bone, suggest that it most likely pertains to an
ornithomimosaur, and discuss the fossil record of other similar taxa of Late Cretaceous
age that have been reported from Europe. To investigate the taphonomy of this fossil,
rare earth element (REE) analysis is combined with strontium (Sr) isotope data to confirm
that this Bulgarian dinosaur bone was initially fossilized in a terrestrial environment,
then later re-worked into late Maastrichtian marine sediments.

Mateus, O., & Jacinto J. J. (2008).  Hemidactylus turcicus. (A Loureiro, N F de Almeida, M.A Carretero, O S Paulo, Ed.).Atlas dos Anfíbio e Répteis de Portugal. 134-135. Abstract
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Mateus, I., Mateus H., Antunes M. T., Mateus O., Taquet P., Ribeiro V., & Manuppella G. (1998).  Upper Jurassic Theropod Dinosaur embryos from Lourinhã (Portugal). Mem. Acad. Ciências de Lisboa. 37, 101-109. Abstractmateus_et_al_1998_-_upper_jurassic_theropod_dinosaur_embryos_from_lourinha_portugal_-_upper_jurassic_palaeoenvironments_in_portugal_ed._....pdfWebsite

Upper Jurassic nesting site from Paimogo (Lourinhã, Portugal) yielded the oldest dinosaur theropod embryos ever found. Numerous bones, including skull bones, from the skeleton of these embryos have been collected. The study of bones and embryos offers the possibility to learn more on the early life of theropod dinosaurs.

Mateus, O. (2008).  Two ornithischian dinosaurs renamed: Microceratops Bohlin 1953 and Diceratops Lull 1905. Journal of Paleontology. 82, , Number 2 Abstract
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Mateus, O., Callapez P. M., & Puértolas-Pascual E. (2017).  The oldest Crocodylia? a new eusuchian from the Late Cretaceous (Cenomanian) of Portugal. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, Program and Abstracts. 2017, 160. Abstractmateus_et_al_2017_oldest_crocodylia_svp_2017_abstract.pdf

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Mateus, O. (2013).  Cathetosaurus as a valid sauropod genus and comparisons with Camarasaurus. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 173., 1 Abstract
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Mateus, O., & Antunes M. T. (2000).  Late Jurassic dinosaurs of Portugal.. Abstracts of the 1st Symposium of European Dinosaurs, p.18. , Dusseldorf, Germany. Abstractmateus__antunes_2000_late_jurassic_dinosaurs_of_portugal_dusseldorf_2000.pdf

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Mateus, O., Overbeeke M., & Rita F. (2008).  Dinosaur Frauds, Hoaxes and "Frankensteins": How to distinguish fake and genuine vertebrate fossils. Journal of Paleontological Techniques. 2, 1-5.. Abstractmateus_et_al_2008_dinosaur_frauds_hoaxes_and_frankensteins-_how_to_distinguish_fake_and_genuine_vertebrate_fossils._journal_of_paleontological_techniques.pdfWebsite

Dinosaurs and other fossils have been artificially enhanced, or totally forged, to increase their commercial value. The most problematic forgeries to detect are based on original fossils that are artificially assembled. Several techniques are suggested for detecting hoaxes: detailed visual examination, chemical analysis, Xray or CT-scan, and ultraviolet light. It is recommended that museums and paleontological researchers do not purchase and/or trade fossils lacking clear provenience information. Exceptions to that general rule should be closely examined using techniques described herein.

Mateus, O. (2010).  Colecções e museus de Geologia: missão e gestão. , 1: Ed. Universidade de Coimbra e Centro de Estudos de História e Filosofia da Ciência Abstract
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Mateus, O., Walen A., & Antunes M. T. (2006).  The large theropod fauna of the Lourinhã Formation (Portugal) and its similarity to the Morrison Formation, with a description of a new species of Allosaurus. New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science Bulletin. 36, 123-129. Abstractmateus_walen_antunes_-_2006_-_the_large_theropod_fauna_of_the_lourinha_formation__portugal__and_its_similarity_to_the_morrison_formation__with_a_description_of_a_new_species_of_allosaurus.pdf

Late Jurassic theropod dinosaurs have been known in Portugal since 1863 but only now are they being fully understood, with the recognition of genera such as Allosaurus, Aviatyrannis, Ceratosaurus, Lourinhanosaurus, and Torvosaurus from the Lourinhã and Alcobaça Formations (Kimmeridgian/Tithonian). Ceratosaurus dentisulcatus can now be reported from Portugal. It represents the only occurrence of this species outside the Morrison Formation.
New cranial elements confirm the presence of Torvosaurus tanneri, in Portugal. Torvosaurus was the largest Late Jurassic land carnivore. New postcranial and cranial elements allow the erection of a new species from Portugal, Allosaurus europaeus n.sp. The theropod assemblage of Portugal is similar to that of the Morrison Formation.

Mateus, O., Antunes M. T., & Taquet P. (2001).  Dinosaur ontogeny : the case of Lourinhanosaurus (Late Jurassic, Portugal). J. Vertebr. Paleontol. 21, Abstract
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Mateus, O. (2009).  DINOSAUR EGGSHELL AND EMBRYO LOCALITIES IN LOURINHA FORMATION, LATE JURASSIC, PORTUGAL. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 29, 76A–76A., 1 Abstract
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Mateus, I., Mateus H., Antunes M. T., Mateus O., Taquet P., Ribeiro V., & Manuppella G. (1997).  Couvée, œufs et embryons d'un Dinosaure Théropode du Jurassique supérieur de Lourinhã (Portugal). Comptes Rendus de l'Academie de Sciences - Serie IIa: Sciences de la Terre et des Planetes. 325, 71–78., Number 1 Abstract
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Mateus, O., and Dinis J., Cunha P. P., & and (2017).  The Lourinhã Formation: the Upper Jurassic to lower most Cretaceous of the Lusitanian Basin, Portugal – landscapes where dinosaurs walked. Ciências da Terra - Earth Sciences Journal. 19, 75–97., sep, Number 1: {NOVA}.{ID}.{FCT} AbstractWebsite
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Mateus, O., Overbeeke M., & Rita F. (2008).  Dinosaur Frauds, Hoaxes and "Frankensteins": How to distinguish fake and genuine vertebrate fossils. Journal of Paleontological Techniques. 2, 1-5. Abstract
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Mateus, O., Dyke G., Motchurova-Dekova N., Ivanov P., & Kamenov G. D. (2008).  The Bulgarian dinosaur: did it exist? European late Cretaceous ornithomimosaurs. 56th Symposium of Vertebrate Palaeontology and Comparative Anatomy. 47–47., Dublin Abstract
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Mateus, O. (1998).  Dinossauros de Portugal e um novo terópode do Jurássico Superior da Lourinhã. , Évora: Universidade de Évora Abstract
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Mateus, O. (2012).  Evidence for presence of clavicles and interclavicles in sauropod dinosaurs and its implications on the furcula-clavicle homology. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 184–185., 1 Abstract

Clavicles and interclavicles are plesiomorphically present in Reptilia. However, several groups show reduction or even loss of these elements. Crocodylimorpha, e.g., lost the clavicles, whereas dinosaurs are generally interpreted to only preserve the clavicles, the theropod furcula representing an unique case of fused clavicles. In sauropods, reports of clavicles are relatively frequent in non-titanosauriforms. These elements are elongated, curved, and rather stout bones with a spatulate and a bifurcate end. However, they were always found as single bones, and differ from the relatively short and unbifurcated clavicles found articulated with the scapulae of basal sauropodomorphs. Elements from the Howe Quarry (Late Jurassic; Wyoming, USA) shed new light on these interpretations. Besides the elongated, curved bones (herein named morphotype A), also pairs of symmetric, L-shaped bones were recovered (morphotype B), associated with diplodocid dorsal and cervical vertebrae. Elements resembling morphotype B - articulated between the scapulae - have recently been reported from a diplodocid found near Tensleep, Wyoming. Taphonomic evidence, as well as the fact that they were preserved in symmetrical pairs, therefore implies that morphotype B represents the true sauropod clavicles. Contrary to earlier reports, morphotype A elements from the Howe Quarry, as well as of previously reported specimens show a symmetry plane following the long axis of the elements. It is thus possible that the morphotype A elements were single bones from the body midline. The only such element present in the pectoral girdle of tetrapods are the interclavicle and the furcula. Comparison with crocodilian and lacertiform interclavicles indicates that the bifurcate end of the sauropod elements might represent the reduced transverse processes of the anterior end, and the spatulate end would have covered the coracoids or sternal plates ventrally. The presence of both clavicles and interclavicles in the pectoral girdle stiffens the anterior trunk, and enhances considerably its stability. Such an enforcement might have been needed in diplodocids due to the strong lateral forces induced to the fore-limbs by the posteriorly placed center of mass (due to shorter fore- than hind-limbs), as well as lateral movements of the enormously elongated necks and tails. The absence of clavicles and interclavicles in titanosauriforms coincides with the development of wide-gauge locomotion style. The presence of interclavicles in sauropods supports the recently proposed homology of the furcula with the interclavicle, instead of representing fused clavicles. Interclavicles were thus not lost, but may have remained cartilaginous or have yet to be found in basal dinosauriforms.

Mateus, O., Laven T., & Knotschke N. (2004).  A dwarf between giants?: A new late Jurassic sauropod from Germany. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 23, 90., Number suppl. to 3 Abstract
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Mateus, O. (2005).  Dinossauros do Jurássico Superior de Portugal, com destaque para os saurísquios. Universidade Nova de Lisboa. , Lisboa
Mateus, O., & Antunes M. T. (2002).  Novos vestígios de dinossauros saurópodes do Jurássico Superior da Lourinhã (Portugal). Congresso Ibérico de Herpetologia. , Évora Abstract
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Mateus, O. (2014).  Comparison of modern and fossil Crocodylomorpha eggs and contribution to the oophylogeny of Amniota. Annual Meeting of the European Association of Vertebrate Palaeontologists. XII Annual Meeting of the European Association of Vertebrate Palaeontologists, 192., 1 Abstract
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Mateus, I., Mateus H., Antunes M. T., Mateus O., Taquet P., Ribeiro V., & Manuppella G. (1998).  Upper Jurassic Theropod Dinosaur embryos from Lourinhã (Portugal). Upper Jurassic paleoenvironments in Portugal, Mem. Acad. Ciências de Lisboa. 37, 101-109. Abstract
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Mateus, O. (2014).  Gigantic jurassic predators. (Agile Libre, Ed.).52 Things You Should Know About Palaeontology. 56–57.: Agile Libre Abstract
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Mateus, O. (2008).  Checklist for Late Jurassic reptiles and amphibians from Portugal. Livro de Resumos do X Congresso Luso-Espanhol de Herpetologia. 55–55., Coimbra Abstract
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Mateus, O., & Milan J. (2008).  Sauropod forelimb flexibility deduced from deep manus tracks. (University of, Glasgow, Ed.).52th Paleontological Association Annual Meeting. 18th-21st December 2008. 67-68. Abstract
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Mateus, O., Butler R. J., Brusatte S. L., Whiteside J. H., & Steyer S. J. (2014).  The first phytosaur (Diapsida, Archosauriformes) from the Late Triassic of the Iberian Peninsula. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 34(4), 970-975.mateus_et_al_2014_first_phytosaur_algarve_portugal_jvp.pdfWebsite
Mateus, O., Mannion P. D., & Upchurch P. (2014).  Zby atlanticus, a new turiasaurian sauropod (Dinosauria, Eusauropoda) from the Late Jurassic of Portugal. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 34, 618–634., Number 3 Abstract
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Mateus, O., & Marzola M. (2014).  Dinosaur taphonomy in the Lourinhã Formation (Late Jurassic, Portugal). 7th International Meeting on Taphonomy and Fossilization, Taphos 2014. 60-61., Ferrara, Italymateus__marzola_2014_lourinha_taphonomy_ferrara_taphonomy_meeting_2014.pdf
Mateus, O. (2017).  Que Dinossauros Existiram em Portugal?. : Poster 80x59 cm, as a supplement of newspaper “Correio da Manhã” of 16 September 2017poster_correio_da_manha.jpg
Mateus, O. (2012).  A preliminary report on coprolites from the Late Triassic part of the Kap Stewart Formation, Jameson Land, East Greenland. Bulletin of the New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science. 57, 203–205., 1, Number NA Abstract

The basal part of the Triassic-Jurassic (Rhaetian-Sinemurian) Kap Stewart Formation, exposed at Jameson Land, East Greenland, yields an extensive coprolite collection from black, parallel-laminated mudstone (“paper shale”), representing an open lacustrine system. Preliminary investigations show three different types of coprolites: elongated cylindrical masses, composed of irregularly wrapped layers; elongated cylindrical masses with constriction marks; and spirally-coiled specimens.