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2016
Myers, T. S., Mateus O., Polcyn M. J., Vineyard D., & Jacobs L. L. (2016).  A new chelonioid turtle from the Paleocene of Cabinda, Angola. Annual Meeting of the Society of Vertebrate Paleontology. 194.: Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, Program and Abstracts, 2016 Abstractmyers_etal_2016_chelonoid_angola_turtle_svp_abstract.pdf

We report a new chelonioid turtle on the basis of a nearly complete skull collected in lower Paleocene, shallow marine deposits, equivalent to the offshore Landana Formation, near the town of Landana in Cabinda Province, Angola. Chelonioid material previously reported from this locality is likely referable to this new taxon. The well-preserved skull is missing the left quadrate, squamosal, and prootic, both opisthotics, and the mandible. The skull possesses a rod-like basisphenoid rostrum, which is a synapomorphy of Chelonioidea, but it differs from other chelonioid skulls in that the contact between the parietal and squamosal is absent, and the posterior palatine foramen is present. Phylogenetic analysis recovers the new taxon as a basal chelonioid. The Paleocene– Eocene strata near Landana have produced a wealth of turtle fossils, including the holotype of the pleurodire Taphrosphys congolensis. A turtle humerus collected from the Landana locality differs morphologically from the humeri of chelonioids and Taphrosphys, indicating the presence of a third taxon. Chelonioid fossil material in the Landana assemblage is rare compared to the abundant fragmentary remains of Taphrosphys that are found throughout the stratigraphic section. This disparity in abundance suggests the new chelonioid taxon preferred open marine habitats, whereas Taphrosphys frequented nearshore environments.

Milàn, J., Mateus O., Marzola M., & Clemmensen L. B. (2016).  Plesiosaur remains from the Lower Jurassic part of the Kap Steward Formation, Jameson Land, East Greenland – evidence of the earliest marine incursion. 60th Annual Meeting Palaeontological Association. 91-92., Lyon, France: Palaeontological Associationmilan_et_al_2016__-_kap_stewart_fm_plesiosaur_-_palass_2016.pdf
Jacobs, L. L., Polcyn M. J., Mateus O., Schulp A. S., Gonçalves A. O., & Morais M. L. (2016).  Post-Gondwana Africa and the vertebrate history of the Angolan Atlantic Coast. Memoirs of Museum Victoria. 74, 343–362. Abstractjacobs_et_al_2016_post-gondwana_africa_and_the_vertebrate_history_of_the_angolan_atlantic_coast_343-362_mmv74_jacobs_4_web.pdf

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Muchagata, J., & Mateus O. (2016).  Sexual display and rostral variation in extinct beaked whale, Globicetus hiberus. XIV EAVP Meeting. 136., Haarlem, The Netherlands: XIV EAVP Meeting, Programme and Abstract Book Abstractmuchagata_et_al_2016_eavp_abstractbook_finalversionjjl_26062016-1.pdf

Iberian extinct ziphiid, Globicetus hiberus, bears a peculiar large bony sphere in the rostrum, the Mesorostral Process of the Premaxillae or MPP. The MPP varies in size and shape of growth in the six specimens studied and seems to have an allometrically growth in one subgroup, but not in the other, suggesting subgroups correspond to males and females (sexual dimorphism). Even more, some rostral structures, such as the medial pad of the premaxillae seem to be associated with the specimens with lower and leaner MPP’s and ossification of the mesorostral canal by the vomer can also be of value in differentiating sex. Beaked whales are deep-diving, echolocation-user odontocetes and able to perceive bones as distinctive echoic images with their sonar; therefore the MPP may work as a secondary sexual organ (“antlers inside” hypothesis by Gol´din, 2014), a mute display structure acting as an “acoustic flag” to be perceived through echolocation by other individuals, giving information about the shape and size of the MPP.

Waskow, K., & Mateus O. (2016).  What is your age? Dorsal rib histology as tool for individual age determination and analysis of life history traits in dinosaurs and other vertebrates. Annual Meeting of the Paleontological Society of Germany (PalGes). 87.
Tschopp, E., & Mateus O. (2016).  Case 3700 Diplodocus Marsh, 1878 (Dinosauria, Sauropoda): Proposed designation of D. carnegii Hatcher, 1901 as the type species. Bulletin of Zoological Nomenclature. 73, 17–24., Number 1: International Commission on Zoological Nomenclature Abstract

The purpose of this application, under Articles 78.1 and 81.1 of the Code, is to replace Diplodocus longus Marsh, 1878 as the type species of the sauropod dinosaur genus Diplodocus by the much better represented D. carnegii Hatcher, 1901, due to the undiagnosable state of the holotype of D. longus (YPM 1920, a partial tail and a chevron). The holotype of D. carnegii, CM 84, is a well-preserved and mostly articulated specimen. Casts of it are on display in various museums around the world, and the species has generally been used as the main reference for studies of comparative anatomy or phylogeny of the genus. Both species are known from the Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation of the western United States. The genus Diplodocus is the basis for the family-level taxa diplodocinae Marsh, 1884, diplodocidae Marsh, 1884, diplodocimorpha Marsh, 1884 (Calvo & Salgado, 1995) and diplodocoidea Marsh, 1884 (Upchurch, 1995). It is also a specifier of at least 10 phylogenetic clades. With the replacement of D. longus by D. carnegii as type species, Diplodocus could be preserved as a taxonomic name with generally accepted content. Taxonomic stability of the entire clade diplodocoidea, and the proposed definitions of several clades within Sauropoda, could be maintained.

Tschopp, E., & Mateus O. (2016).  Diplodocus Marsh, 1878 (Dinosauria, Sauropoda): proposed designation of D. carnegii Hatcher, 1901 as the type species. Bulletin of Zoological Nomenclature. 73, 17-24. Abstract
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Moreno-Azanza, M., Gasca J. M., Canudo J. I., Lázaro B. B., & Mateus O. (2016).  The evolution of the ornithischian eggshell: State of the art and perspectives. Abstracts with Programs, the 2016 Annual Meeting, the Palaeontological Society of Japan. 6., Fukui, Japan Abstract
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Moreno-Azanza, M., Gasca J. M., Canudo J. I., L\áżaro B. B., & Mateus O. (2016).  The evolution of the ornithischian eggshell: State of the art and perspectives. Abstracts with Programs, the 2016 Annual Meeting, the Palaeontological Society of Japan. 6., Fukui, Japan Abstract
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Moreno-Azanza, M., Gasca J. M., Canudo J. I., Lázaro B. B., & Mateus O. (2016).  The evolution of the ornithischian eggshell: State of the art and perspectives. : Palaeontological Society of Japan Abstract
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Mateus, O. (2016).  Exemplos bizarros de evolucão em dinossauros e alguns casos portugueses. Do Big Bang ao Homem. 81–95.: U.Porto Edicões Abstract
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Mateus, O. (2016).  Exemplos bizarros de evolução em dinossauros e alguns casos portugueses. Do Big Bang ao Homem. 81-95., Porto: U.Porto Edi{\c c}ões Abstract
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Mateus, O. (2016).  Exemplos bizarros de evolução em dinossauros e alguns casos portugueses. Do Big Bang ao Homem. 81-95., Porto Abstract
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Polcyn, M. J., Bardet N., Amaghzaz M., Gon{\c c}alves O. A., Jourani E., Kaddumi H. F., Lindgren J., Mateus O., Meslouhf S., Morais M. L., Pereda-Suberbiola X., Schulp A. S., Vincent P., & Jacobs L. L. (2016).  An extremely derived plioplatecarpine mosasaur from the Maastrichtian of Africa and the Middle East. 5th Triennial Mosasaur Meeting- a global perspective on Mesozoic marine amniotes. 16-20, May 16-20, 2016., Uppsala, Sweden: Museum of Evolutiom, Uppsala University. Abstract

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Polcyn, M. J., Bardet N., Amaghzaz M., Gon\{\c c\}alves O. A., Jourani E., Kaddumi H. F., Lindgren J., Mateus O., Meslouhf S., Morais M. L., Pereda-Suberbiola X., Schulp A. S., Vincent P., & Jacobs L. L. (2016).  An extremely derived plioplatecarpine mosasaur from the Maastrichtian of Africa and the Middle East. 5th Triennial Mosasaur Meeting- a global perspective on Mesozoic marine amniotes. 16-20, May 16-20, 2016., Uppsala, Sweden Abstract
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Polcyn, {M. J. }, Bardet N., Amaghzaz M., Gonçalves {A. O. }, Jourani E., Kaddumi {H. F. }, Lindgren J., Mateus O., Meslouhf S., & Morais {M. L. } (2016).  An extremely derived plioplatecarpine mosasaur from the Maastrichtian of Africa and the Middle East. 32–33. Abstract
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Marzola, M., Mateus O., Wings O., Klein N., Milan J., & [Unknown] L. B. C. (2016).  The herpetofauna from the Late Triassic of the Jameson Land Basin (East Greenland): review and updates. : XIV EAVP Meeting, Programme and Abstract Book Abstract
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Marzola, M., Mateus O., Wings O., Klein N., M{\`ılan J., & L.B.Clemmensen (2016).  The herpetofauna from the Late Triassic of the Jameson Land Basin (East Greenland): review and updates. XIV EAVP Meeting. 182., Haarlem, The Netherlands: XIV EAVP Meeting, Programme and Abstract Book Abstract
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Marzola, M., Mateus O., Wings O., Klein N., M\{\`ı\}lan J., & L.B.Clemmensen (2016).  The herpetofauna from the Late Triassic of the Jameson Land Basin (East Greenland): review and updates. XIV EAVP Meeting. 182., Haarlem, The Netherlands Abstract
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Mateus, O. (2016).  Late Jurassic of Morrison Formation and Portugal tetrapods compared: a model to explain faunal exchange and similarity. Annual Meeting of the Society of Vertebrate Paleontology. 185., Salt Late City: Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, Program and Abstracts, 2016 Abstract

The precursor of the North Atlantic existed between the North American and Iberian blocks from the earliest Jurassic Hettangian and has been ever expanding since. By the Kimmeridgian and Tithonian, when much of the Morrison Fm rocks were deposited, the proto-Atlantic was more than 300 km wide at 27° paleolatitude between North America and Iberia. Macrovertebrate paleontology reveals a unique story to the isolation of Iberia and instead suggest a paleogeographic land connection between North American and Iberia. Torvosaurus, Allosaurus, Ceratosaurus, Stegosaurus, Supersaurus and others have a distribution restricted to Morrison Formation in North America and Lourinhã Formation in Portugal. A novel paleogeographic model is here suggested: (1) around the Middle–Late Jurassic transition there is a major palaeoceanographic and palaeoclimatic reorganization, coincidental to a major eustatic sea-level drop and uplift associated with the Callovian– Oxfordian Atlantic Regressive Event; (2) creating an ephemeral land bridge presenting a temporary opportunity for terrestrial gateways likely across the Flemish Cap and Galician Bank land masses, allowing large dinosaurian taxa to cross the northern proto-Atlantic in both directions; (3) finally, a Callovian–Oxfordian faunal exchange around the 163 Ma, through latest Kimmeridgian at 152 Ma (the age of equivalent genera in both Morrison and Portugal), is was an interval that allowed speciation, but retaining generic similarity of vertebrates. This model is consistent with the chronology and taxonomy required for speciation of the Iberian and American forms, exemplified by the coeval sister-taxa pairs Torvosaurus tanneri and T. gurneyi, Allosaurus fragilis and A. europaeus, or Supersaurus vivianae and S. lourinhanensis. While some of the smaller animals in the fauna show Morrison/Portugal affinities, most from Iberia have European or even Asian affinities. The larger-bodied fauna are more closely related to Morrison than to mainland Europe (except for dacentrurine stegosaurs). The body size differences and affinities of taxa across paleogeography is comparable to what is observed today across the Wallace Line. Migration may have also occurred in both directions. The closest relative of Torvosaurus is likely the European Bathonian Megalosaurus, thus the presence of the genus in North America represents a European migration. On other hand, Allosaurus and Supersaurus origins are consistent with a North American origin, representing an westto-east migration.

Mateus, O. (2016).  Late Jurassic of Morrison Formation and Portugal tetrapods compared: a model to explain faunal exchange and similarity. Annual Meeting of the Society of Vertebrate Paleontology. 185., Salt Late City Abstract
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Leal, A. A., Dion{\'ısio A., Braga M. A. S., & Mateus O. (2016).  The long term preservation of Late Jurassic sandstone dinosaur footprints in a museum environment. International Journal of Conservation Science. 7, 627-646. AbstractWebsite

This study focuses on the assessment of the degradation processes occurring in three sandstone infills of fossilized Late Jurassic ornithopod tridactyl footprints, found in 2001 in a coastline cliff in Porto das Barcas (Lourinhã, Portugal) and exhibited in a museum display since 2004. These dinosaur footprints present nowadays severe decay phenomena compromising their physical integrity and are leading gradually to their loss of value. The deterioration patterns were recorded, a map of their distribution was prepared and several samples were collected both in the dinosaur footprints and in the coastline cliff. Different analytical procedures were applied such as XRD, FTIR, FESEM and Ion Chromatography. A microclimatic survey was also performed and air temperature and relative humidity was measured during eight months both indoor and also outdoor. The decay patterns observed are a combination intrinsic and extrinsic factors the stone material, namely swelling of clay minerals in the rock matrix (smectite and chlorite-smectite mixed-layer), presence of salts (mainly chlorides), application of past conservation treatments (poly(vinyl) acetate and epoxy resins) and with the museum’s indoor thermohygrometric conditions (mainly non-stable hygrometric conditions). This scientific knowledge is therefore essential to the sustainable preservation of this paleontological heritage.

Leal, A. A., Dion\{\'ı\}sio A., Braga M. A. S., & Mateus O. (2016).  The long term preservation of Late Jurassic sandstone dinosaur footprints in a museum environment. International Journal of Conservation Science. 7, 627-646. Abstract
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Leal, A. S., Dionísio A., Sequeira Braga M. A., & Mateus O. (2016).  The long term preservation of late jurassic sandstone dinossaur footprints in a museum environment. International Journal of Conservation Science. 7, 627-646., Number 3 Abstract
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Myers, T. S., Mateus O., Polcyn M. J., Vineyard D., & Jacobs L. L. (2016).  A new chelonioid turtle from the Paleocene of Cabinda, Angola. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, Program and Abstracts, 2016, p. 194.. 194. Abstract

We report a new chelonioid turtle on the basis of a nearly complete skull collected in lower Paleocene, shallow marine deposits, equivalent to the offshore Landana Formation, near the town of Landana in Cabinda Province, Angola. Chelonioid material previously reported from this locality is likely referable to this new taxon. The well-preserved skull is missing the left quadrate, squamosal, and prootic, both opisthotics, and the mandible. The skull possesses a rod-like basisphenoid rostrum, which is a synapomorphy of Chelonioidea, but it differs from other chelonioid skulls in that the contact between the parietal and squamosal is absent, and the posterior palatine foramen is present. Phylogenetic analysis recovers the new taxon as a basal chelonioid. The Paleocene– Eocene strata near Landana have produced a wealth of turtle fossils, including the holotype of the pleurodire Taphrosphys congolensis. A turtle humerus collected from the Landana locality differs morphologically from the humeri of chelonioids and Taphrosphys, indicating the presence of a third taxon. Chelonioid fossil material in the Landana assemblage is rare compared to the abundant fragmentary remains of Taphrosphys that are found throughout the stratigraphic section. This disparity in abundance suggests the new chelonioid taxon preferred open marine habitats, whereas Taphrosphys frequented nearshore environments.

Myers, T. S., Mateus O., Polcyn M. J., Vineyard D., & Jacobs L. L. (2016).  A new chelonioid turtle from the Paleocene of Cabinda, Angola. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, Program and Abstracts, 2016, p. 194.. 194. Abstract
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Myers, T. S., Mateus O., Polcyn {M. J. }, Vineyard D., & Jacobs L. L. (2016).  A new chelonioid turtle from the Paleocene of Cabinda, Angola. Abstract

We report a new chelonioid turtle on the basis of a nearly complete skull collected in lower Paleocene, shallow marine deposits, equivalent to the offshore Landana Formation, near the town of Landana in Cabinda Province, Angola. Chelonioid material previously reported from this locality is likely referable to this new taxon. The well-preserved skull is missing the left quadrate, squamosal, and prootic, both opisthotics, and the mandible. The skull possesses a rod-like basisphenoid rostrum, which is a synapomorphy of Chelonioidea, but it differs from other chelonioid skulls in that the contact between the parietal and squamosal is absent, and the posterior palatine foramen is present. Phylogenetic analysis recovers the new taxon as a basal chelonioid. The Paleocenetextendash Eocene strata near Landana have produced a wealth of turtle fossils, including the holotype of the pleurodire Taphrosphys congolensis. A turtle humerus collected from the Landana locality differs morphologically from the humeri of chelonioids and Taphrosphys, indicating the presence of a third taxon. Chelonioid fossil material in the Landana assemblage is rare compared to the abundant fragmentary remains of Taphrosphys that are found throughout the stratigraphic section. This disparity in abundance suggests the new chelonioid taxon preferred open marine habitats, whereas Taphrosphys frequented nearshore environments.

Ceríaco, L. M. P., Gutiérrez E. E., Dubois A., Abdala C. S., Alqarni A. S., Adler K., et al. (2016).  Photography-based taxonomy is inadequate, unnecessary, and potentially harmful for biological sciences. Zootaxa. 4196, 435-445., Number 3 Abstract
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Mil\à\}n, J., Mateus O., Marzola M., & Clemmensen L. B. (2016).  Plesiosaur remains from the Lower Jurassic part of the Kap Steward Formation, Jameson Land, East Greenland \–\} evidence of the earliest marine incursion. 60th Annual Meeting Palaeontological Association. 91-92., Lyon, France Abstract
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Milàn, J., Mateus O., Marzola M., & Clemmensen L. B. (2016).  Plesiosaur remains from the Lower Jurassic part of the Kap Steward Formation, Jameson Land, East Greenland – evidence of the earliest marine incursion. 60th Annual Meeting Palaeontological Association. 91-92., Lyon, France: Palaeontological Association Abstract
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Jacobs, L. L., Polcyn M. J., Mateus O., Schulp A. S., Gon?alves A. O., & Morais M. L. (2016).  Post-Gondwana Africa and the vertebrate history of the Angolan Atlantic Coast. Memoirs of Museum Victoria. 74, 343-362. Abstract
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Jacobs, L. L., Polcyn M. J., Mateus O. \á\}vio, Schulp A. S., Gon\{\c c\}alves A. \ó\}nio O., & Morais M. L. (2016).  Post-Gondwana Africa and the vertebrate history of the Angolan Atlantic Coast. Memoirs of Museum Victoria. 74, 343\–\}362. Abstract
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Muchagata, J., & Mateus O. (2016).  Sexual display and rostral variation in extinct beaked whale, Globicetus hiberus. XIV EAVP Meeting. 136., Haarlem, The Netherlands: XIV EAVP Meeting, Programme and Abstract Book Abstract
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Muchagata, J., & Mateus O. (2016).  Sexual display and rostral variation in extinct beaked whale, Globicetus hiberus. XIV EAVP Meeting. 136., Haarlem, The Netherlands Abstract
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Muchagata, J., & Mateus O. (2016).  Sexual display and rostral variation in extinct beaked whale, Globicetus hiberus. : XIV EAVP Meeting, Programme and Abstract Book Abstract
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Silva, T., Costa F., Fernandes J., Calvo R., & Mateus O. (2016).  The use of a portable X-ray fluorescence analyzer in the reconstitution of dinosaur fossils. European Conference on X-Ray Spectrometry. , June 19 – 24, 2016, Gothenburg, Sweden Abstract
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Silva, T., Costa F., Fernandes J., Calvo R. \é\}rio, & Mateus O. \á\}vio (2016).  The use of a portable X-ray fluorescence analyzer in the reconstitution of dinosaur fossils. European Conference on X-Ray Spectrometry. , June 19 \–\} 24, 2016, Gothenburg, Sweden Abstract
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Waskow, K., & Mateus O. (2016).  What is your age? Dorsal rib histology as tool for individual age determination and analysis of life history traits in dinosaurs and other vertebrates. Annual Meeting of the Paleontological Society of Germany (PalGes). 87. Abstract
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Waskow, K., & Mateus O. (2016).  What is your age? Dorsal rib histology as tool for individual age determination and analysis of life history traits in dinosaurs and other vertebrates. Annual Meeting of the Paleontological Society of Germany (PalGes). 87. Abstract
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2015
Marzola, M., Mateus O., Schulp A. S., Jacobs L. L., Polcyn M. J., Pervov V., Goncalves A. O., & Morais M. L. (2015).  Comparative anatomy and systematics of Cretaceous mammal tracks of Angola. 13th Annual Meeting of the European Association of Vertebrate Palaeontologists - EAVP 2015. , July 2015, Opole, Poland: European Association of Vertebrate Palaeontologistsmarzola_et_al_2015_catoca_tracks_eavp.pdf
Marzola, M., Mateus O., Schulp A. S., Jacobs L. L., Polcyn M. J., Pervov V., Goncalves A. O., & Morais M. L. (2015).  Comparative anatomy and systematics of Cretaceous mammal tracks of Angola. 13th Annual Meeting of the European Association of Vertebrate Palaeontologists - EAVP 2015. , July 2015, Opole, Poland: European Association of Vertebrate Palaeontologists Abstract
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Foth, C., Evers S. W., Pabst B., Mateus O., Flisch A., Patthey M., & Rauhut O. W. M. (2015).  New insights into the lifestyle of \\textitAllosaurus (Dinosauria: Theropoda) based on another specimen with multiple pathologies. PeerJ. 3, e940., 5 AbstractWebsite

Adult large-bodied theropods are often found with numerous pathologies. A large, almost complete, probably adult \\textitAllosaurus specimen from the Howe Stephens Quarry, Morrison Formation (Late Kimmeridgian–Early Tithonian), Wyoming, exhibits multiple pathologies. Pathologic bones include the left dentary, two cervical vertebrae, one cervical and several dorsal ribs, the left scapula, the left humerus, the right ischium, and two left pedal phalanges. These pathologies can be classified as follows: the fifth cervical vertebra, the scapula, several ribs and the ischium are probably traumatic, and a callus on the shaft of the left pedal phalanx II-2 is probably traumatic-infectious. Traumatically fractured elements exposed to frequent movement (e.g., the scapula and the ribs) show a tendency to develop pseudarthroses instead of a callus. The pathologies in the lower jaw and a reduced extensor tubercle of the left pedal phalanx II-2 are most likely traumatic or developmental in origin. The pathologies on the fourth cervical are most likely developmental in origin or idiopathic, that on the left humerus could be traumatic, developmental, infectious or idiopathic, whereas the left pedal phalanx IV-1 is classified as idiopathic. With exception of the ischium, all as traumatic/traumatic-infectious classified pathologic elements show unambiguous evidences of healing, indicating that the respective pathologies did not cause the death of this individual. Alignment of the scapula and rib pathologies from the left side suggests that all may have been caused by a single traumatic event. The ischial fracture may have been fatal. The occurrence of multiple lesions interpreted as traumatic pathologies again underlines that large-bodied theropods experienced frequent injuries during life, indicating an active predatory lifestyle, and their survival perhaps supports a gregarious behavior for \\textitAllosaurus. Alternatively, the frequent survival of traumatic events could be also related to the presence of non-endothermic metabolic rates that allow survival based on sporadic food consumption or scavenging behavior. Signs of pathologies consistent with infections are scarce and locally restricted, indicating a successful prevention of the spread of pathogens, as it is the case in extant reptiles (including birds).

Tschopp, E., Mateus O., & Benson R. B. J. (2015).  A specimen-level phylogenetic analysis and taxonomic revision of Diplodocidae (Dinosauria, Sauropoda). PeerJ. 3, e857., 4 Abstracttschopp_et_al_2015_brontosaurus_peerj-857.pdfWebsite

Diplodocidae are among the best known sauropod dinosaurs. Several species were described in the late 1800s or early 1900s from the Morrison Formation of North America. Since then, numerous additional specimens were recovered in the USA, Tanzania, Portugal, and Argentina, as well as possibly Spain, England, Georgia, Zimbabwe, and Asia. To date, the clade includes about 12 to 15 nominal species, some of them with questionable taxonomic status (e.g., ‘\textit{Diplodocus}’ \textit{hayi} or \textit{Dyslocosaurus polyonychius}), and ranging in age from Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous. However, intrageneric relationships of the iconic, multi-species genera \textit{Apatosaurus} and \textit{Diplodocus} are still poorly known. The way to resolve this issue is a specimen-based phylogenetic analysis, which has been previously implemented for \textit{Apatosaurus}, but is here performed for the first time for the entire clade of Diplodocidae.The analysis includes 81 operational taxonomic units, 49 of which belong to Diplodocidae. The set of OTUs includes all name-bearing type specimens previously proposed to belong to Diplodocidae, alongside a set of relatively complete referred specimens, which increase the amount of anatomically overlapping material. Non-diplodocid outgroups were selected to test the affinities of potential diplodocid specimens that have subsequently been suggested to belong outside the clade. The specimens were scored for 477 morphological characters, representing one of the most extensive phylogenetic analyses of sauropod dinosaurs. Character states were figured and tables given in the case of numerical characters.The resulting cladogram recovers the classical arrangement of diplodocid relationships. Two numerical approaches were used to increase reproducibility in our taxonomic delimitation of species and genera. This resulted in the proposal that some species previously included in well-known genera like \textit{Apatosaurus} and \textit{Diplodocus} are generically distinct. Of particular note is that the famous genus \textit{Brontosaurus} is considered valid by our quantitative approach. Furthermore, “\textit{Diplodocus}” hayi represents a unique genus, which will herein be called \textit{Galeamopus} gen. nov. On the other hand, these numerical approaches imply synonymization of “\textit{Dinheirosaurus}” from the Late Jurassic of Portugal with the Morrison Formation genus \textit{Supersaurus}. Our use of a specimen-, rather than species-based approach increases knowledge of intraspecific and intrageneric variation in diplodocids, and the study demonstrates how specimen-based phylogenetic analysis is a valuable tool in sauropod taxonomy, and potentially in paleontology and taxonomy as a whole.

Foth, C., Evers S., Pabst B., Mateus O., Flisch A., Patthey M., & Rauhut O. W. M. (2015).  New insights into the lifestyle of Allosaurus (Dinosauria: Theropoda) based on another specimen with multiple pathologies. PeerJ PrePrints. 3, e824v1., 2015 Abstractfoth_et_al_2015_peerj-preprints-824.pdfWebsite

Adult large-bodied theropods are often found with numerous pathologies. A large, almost complete, probably adult Allosaurus specimen from the Howe Stephens Quarry, Morrison Formation (Late Kimmeridgian–Early Tithonian), Wyoming, shows multiple pathologies. Pathologic bones include the left dentary, two cervical vertebrae, one cervical and several dorsal ribs, the left scapula, the left humerus, right ischium, and two left pedal phalanges. These pathologies can be classified as follows: the fifth cervical vertebra, the scapula, several ribs and the ischium are traumatic, and a callus on the shaft of the left pedal phalanx II-2 is traumatic-infectious. Traumatically fractured elements exposed to frequent movement (e.g. the scapula and the ribs) show a tendency to develop pseudarthroses instead of callus healing. The pathologies in the lower jaw and a reduced flexor tubercle of the left pedal phalanx II-2 are most likely traumatic or developmental in origin. The pathologies on the fourth cervical are most likely developmental in origin or idiopathic, that on the left humerus is infectious or idiopathic, whereas left pedal phalanx IV-1 is classified as idiopathic. With exception of the ischium, all traumatic / traumatic-infectious pathologic elements show unambiguous evidences of healing, indicating that the respective pathologies did not cause the death of this individual. Alignment of the scapula and rib pathologies from the left side suggests that all may have been caused by a single traumatic event. The ischial fracture may have been fatal. The occurrence of multiple traumatic pathologies again underlines that large-bodied theropods experienced frequent injuries during life, indicating an active predatory lifestyle, and their survival perhaps supports a gregarious behavior for Allosaurus. Signs of infections are scarce and locally restricted, indicating a successful prevention of the spread of pathogens, as it is the case in extant reptiles (including birds).

Brusatte, S. L., Butler R. J., Mateus O., & Steyer S. J. (2015).  A new species of Metoposaurus from the Late Triassic of Portugal and comments on the systematics and biogeography of metoposaurid temnospondyls. Journal of Vertebrate PaleontologyJournal of Vertebrate Paleontology. e912988., 2015: Taylor & Francis Abstractbrusatte_et_al2015metoposaurusportugal.pdfWebsite

ABSTRACTMetoposaurids are a group of temnospondyl amphibians that filled crocodile-like predatory niches in fluvial and lacustrine environments during the Late Triassic. Metoposaurids are common in the Upper Triassic sediments of North Africa, Europe, India, and North America, but many questions about their systematics and phylogeny remain unresolved. We here erect Metoposaurus algarvensis, sp. nov., the first Metoposaurus species from the Iberian Peninsula, based on several new specimens from a Late Triassic bonebed in Algarve, southern Portugal. We describe the cranial and pectoral anatomy of M. algarvensis and compare it with other metoposaurids (particularly other specimens of Metoposaurus from Germany and Poland). We provide a revised diagnosis and species-level taxonomy for the genus Metoposaurus, which is currently represented with certainty by three European species (M. diagnosticus, M. krasiejowensis, M. algarvensis). We also identify cranial characters that differentiate these three species, and may have phylogenetic significance. These include features of the braincase and mandible, which indicate that metoposaurid skulls are more variable than previously thought. The new Portuguese bonebed provides further evidence that metoposaurids congregated in fluvial and lacustrine settings across their geographic range and often succumbed to mass death events. We provide an updated paleogeographic map depicting all known metoposaurid occurrences, which shows that these temnospondyls were globally distributed in low latitudes during the Late Triassic and had a similar, but not identical, paleogeographic range as phytosaurs.http://zoobank.org/urn:lsid:zoobank.org:pub:083C80C6-0AB6-49E1-A636-6A8BDBC06A47ABSTRACTMetoposaurids are a group of temnospondyl amphibians that filled crocodile-like predatory niches in fluvial and lacustrine environments during the Late Triassic. Metoposaurids are common in the Upper Triassic sediments of North Africa, Europe, India, and North America, but many questions about their systematics and phylogeny remain unresolved. We here erect Metoposaurus algarvensis, sp. nov., the first Metoposaurus species from the Iberian Peninsula, based on several new specimens from a Late Triassic bonebed in Algarve, southern Portugal. We describe the cranial and pectoral anatomy of M. algarvensis and compare it with other metoposaurids (particularly other specimens of Metoposaurus from Germany and Poland). We provide a revised diagnosis and species-level taxonomy for the genus Metoposaurus, which is currently represented with certainty by three European species (M. diagnosticus, M. krasiejowensis, M. algarvensis). We also identify cranial characters that differentiate these three species, and may have phylogenetic significance. These include features of the braincase and mandible, which indicate that metoposaurid skulls are more variable than previously thought. The new Portuguese bonebed provides further evidence that metoposaurids congregated in fluvial and lacustrine settings across their geographic range and often succumbed to mass death events. We provide an updated paleogeographic map depicting all known metoposaurid occurrences, which shows that these temnospondyls were globally distributed in low latitudes during the Late Triassic and had a similar, but not identical, paleogeographic range as phytosaurs.http://zoobank.org/urn:lsid:zoobank.org:pub:083C80C6-0AB6-49E1-A636-6A8BDBC06A47

Araújo, R., Polcyn M. J., Lindgren J., Jacobs L. L., Schulp A. S., Mateus O., Gonçalves O. A., & Morais M. - L. (2015).  New aristonectine elasmosaurid plesiosaur specimens from the Early Maastrichtian of Angola and comments on paedomorphism in plesiosaurs. Netherlands Journal of Geosciences. FirstView, 1–16., 2 Abstractaraujo_et_al_2015_paedomorphism-libre.pdfWebsite

ABSTRACT New elasmosaurid plesiosaur specimens are described from the Early Maastrichtian of Angola. Phylogenetic analyses reconstruct the Angolan taxon as an aristonectine elasmosaurid and the sister taxon of an unnamed form of similar age from New Zealand. Comparisons also indicate a close relationship with an unnamed form previously described from Patagonia. All of these specimens exhibit an ostensibly osteologically immature external morphology, but histological analysis of the Angolan material suggests an adult with paedomorphic traits. By extension, the similarity of the Angolan, New Zealand and Patagonian material indicates that these specimens represent a widespread paedomorphic yet unnamed taxon.

Strganac, C., Jacobs L. L., Polcyn M. J., Ferguson K. M., Mateus O., Gonçalves O. A., Morais M. - L., & da Silva Tavares T. (2015).  Stable oxygen isotope chemostratigraphy and paleotemperature regime of mosasaurs at Bentiaba, Angola. Netherlands Journal of Geosciences. FirstView, 1–7., 2 Abstractstrganac_etal2015_stable_oxigen_isotopes.pdfWebsite

ABSTRACT Stable oxygen isotope values of inoceramid marine bivalve shells recovered from Bentiaba, Angola, are utilised as a proxy for paleotemperatures during the Late Cretaceous development of the African margin of the South Atlantic Ocean. The δ18O values derived from inoceramids show a long-term increase from –3.2‰ in the Late Turonian to values between –0.8 and –1.8‰ in the Late Campanian. Assuming a constant oceanic δ18O value, an ∼2‰ increase may reflect cooling of the shallow marine environment at Bentiaba by approximately 10°. Bentiaba values are offset by about +1‰ from published records for bathyal Inoceramus at Walvis Ridge. This offset in δ18O values suggests a temperature difference of ∼5° between coastal and deeper water offshore Angola. Cooler temperatures implied by the δ18O curve at Bentiaba coincide with the stratigraphic distribution of diverse marine amniotes, including mosasaurs, at Bentiaba.