Publications

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2018
Myers, T. S., Polcyn M. J., Mateus O., Vineyard D. P., Gon?alves A. O., & Jacobs L. L. (2018).  A new durophagous stem cheloniid turtle from the lower Paleocene of Cabinda, Angola. Papers in Palaeontology. 4, 161-176., Number 2 Abstract
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Guillaume, A. R. D., Moreno-Azanza M., Puértolas-Pascual E., & Mateus O. (2018).  Crocodylomorph teeth from the Lourinhã Formation, Portugal (Late Jurassic). XVI Annual Meeting of the European Association of Vertebrate Palaeontologists. 80., Caparica, Portugal June 26th-July 1st, 2018 Abstractguillaume_et_al_2018_eavp_abstract.pdf

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Guillaume, A. R. D., Moreno-Azanza M., & Mateus O. (2018).  Microvertebrates from the Lourinhã Formation (Late Jurassic, Portugal). 1st Palaeontological Virtual Congress. online. Abstractguillaume-et-al_pvc2018_abstract.pdf

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2019
Mateus, O., Callapez P. M., Polcyn M. J., Schulp A. S., Gonçalves A. O., & Jacobs L. L. (2019).  The Fossil Record of Biodiversity in Angola Through Time: A Paleontological Perspective. (Huntley, Brian J., Russo, Vladimir, Lages, Fernanda, Ferrand, Nuno, Ed.).Biodiversity of Angola: Science {&} Conservation: A Modern Synthesis. 53–76., Cham: Springer International Publishing Abstract

This chapter provides an overview of the alpha paleobiodiversity of Angola based on the available fossil record that is limited to the sedimentary rocks, ranging in age from Precambrian to the present. The geological period with the highest paleobiodiversity in the Angolan fossil record is the Cretaceous, with more than 80{%} of the total known fossil taxa, especially marine molluscs, including ammonites as a majority among them. The vertebrates represent about 15{%} of the known fauna and about one tenth of them are species firstly described based on specimens from Angola.

Guillaume, A. R., Moreno-Azanza M., & Mateus O. (2019).  New lissamphibian material from the Lourinhã Formation (Late Jurassic, Portugal). Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, Program and Abstracts. 112. Abstract
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Schulp, A. S., Mateus O., Polcyn M., Gonçalves A., & Jacobs L. L. (2019).  Angola and its role in the paleobiogeography of Gondwana. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, Program and Abstracts. 188.schulp_et_al_2019_angola_svp_abstract.pdf
Mateus, O., Callapez P. M., Polcyn M. J., Schulp A. S., Gonçalves A. O., & Jacobs L. L. (2019).  The Fossil Record of Biodiversity in Angola Through Time: A Paleontological Perspective. (Huntley, Brian J., Russo, Vladimir, Lages, Fernanda, Ferrand, Nuno, Ed.).Biodiversity of Angola: Science & Conservation: A Modern Synthesis. 53–76.: Springer International Publishing Abstractmateus2019_chapter_thefossilrecordofbiodiversityi.pdf

This chapter provides an overview of the alpha paleobiodiversity of Angola based on the available fossil record that is limited to the sedimentary rocks, ranging in age from Precambrian to the present. The geological period with the highest paleobiodiversity in the Angolan fossil record is the Cretaceous, with more than 80{%} of the total known fossil taxa, especially marine molluscs, including ammonites as a majority among them. The vertebrates represent about 15{%} of the known fauna and about one tenth of them are species firstly described based on specimens from Angola.

Guillaume, A. R., Moreno-Azanza M., & Mateus O. (2019).  New lissamphibian material from the Lourinhã Formation (Late Jurassic, Portugal). Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, Program and Abstracts. 112.guillaume_et_al_2019_svp_abstract.pdf
Mateus, O., Callapez P. M., Polcyn M. J., Schulp A. S., Gonçalves A. O., & Jacobs L. L. (2019).  O registo fóssil da biodiversidade em Angola ao longo do tempo: uma perspectiva paleontológica. (Huntley B.J., Russo V., Lages F., Ferrand N., Ed.).Biodiversidade de Angola: Ciência e Conservação - Uma Síntese Moderna. 89-116., Porto: Arte & Ciência Abstractmateus_et_al_2019_paleobiodiversidade_angola.pdf

Este capítulo apresenta uma visão geral da paleobiodiversidade alfa de Angola com base no registo fóssil disponível, o qual se limita às rochas sedimentares, a sua idade variando entre o Pré‑Câmbrico e o pre‑
sente. O período geológico com a maior paleobiodiversidade no registo fóssil angolano é o Cretácico, com mais de 80% do total dos táxones fósseis conhecidos, especialmente moluscos marinhos, sendo estes na sua maioria
amonites. Os vertebrados representam cerca de 15% da fauna conhecida e cerca de um décimo destes são espécies descritas pela primeira vez com base em espécimes de Angola.

2020
Jacobs, L.  L., Sousa N., Goncalves A.  O., Mateus O., Polcyn M.  J., & Schulp A.  S. (2020).  Projecto PaleoAngola: Geoheritage and Conservation Paleobiology as Science for Development in Angola. AGU Fall Meeting Abstracts. 2020, SY048-05. Abstractprojecto_paleoangola__geoheritage.pdf

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Jackson, Y. J., Economos R. C., Jacobs L. L., Mateus O., & Gonçalves A. O. (2020).  When dinosaurs walked through diamonds: constraining the age of Early Cretaceous footprints in volcanic crater sediments. 54th Annual GSA South-Central Section Meeting 2020. , Fort Worth: Geological Society of America Abstracts with Programs. Vol. 52, No. 1jackson_et_al_2020_abstract__when_dinosaurs_walked_through_diamonds__gsa.pdf
Guillaume, A. R. D., Moreno-Azanza M., Puértolas-Pascual E., & Mateus O. (2020).  Palaeobiodiversity of crocodylomorphs from the Lourinhã Formation based on the tooth record: insights into the palaeoecology of the Late Jurassic of Portugal. Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society. 189(2), 549–583., 11 Abstractguillaume_et_al_palaeobiodiversity_of_crocodylomorphs_from_the.pdfWebsite

{Crocodylomorphs were a diverse clade in the Late Jurassic of Portugal, with six taxa reported to date. Here we describe 126 isolated teeth recovered by screen-washing of sediments from Valmitão (Lourinhã, Portugal, late Kimmeridgian–Tithonian), a vertebrate microfossil assemblage in which at least five distinct crocodylomorph taxa are represented. Ten morphotypes are described and attributed to five clades (Lusitanisuchus, Atoposauridae, Goniopholididae, Bernissartiidae and an undetermined mesoeucrocodylian). Four different ecomorphotypes are here proposed according to ecological niches and feeding behaviours: these correspond to a diet based on arthropods and small vertebrates (Lusitanisuchus and Atoposauridae), a generalist diet (Goniopholididae), a durophagous diet (Bernissartiidae) and a carnivorous diet. Lusitanisuchus mitracostatus material from Guimarota is here redescribed to achieve a better illustration and comparison with the new material.This assemblage shares similar ecomorphotypes with other Mesozoic west-central European localities, where a diversity of crocodylomorphs lived together, avoiding direct ecological competition through niche partitioning. The absence of large marine crocodylomorphs, present in other contemporaneous assemblages, is here interpreted as evidence that the Valmitão assemblage was deposited in a freshwater environment, although sample bias cannot be completely ruled out. These affinities are further supported by the presence of lanceolate and leaf-shaped teeth associated with continental clades.}

2021
Guillaume, A. R. D., Natário C., Moreno-Azanza M., & Mateus O. (2021).  New material ascribed to Albanerpetontidae (Lissamphibia; Allocaudata) from the Lourinhã Formation: evidence for intraspecific variation. XIX Encontro de Jovens Investigadores em Paleontologia. 50-51. Abstractguillaume_et_al_2021_albanerpetontidae.pdf

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Guillaume, A. R. D., Natário C., Moreno-Azanza M., & Mateus O. (2021).  New occurences of Celtedens (Lissamphibia: Albanerpetontidae) from the Lourinhã Formation. XVIII Conference of the European Association of Vertebrate Palaeontologists. 87. Abstractguillaume_et_al_2021_celtedens.pdf

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Moreno-Azanza, M., Ezquerro L., Gasca J. M., Díaz-Berenguer E., Nuñez-Lahuerta C., Pérez-Pueyo M., Puértolas-Pascual E., Sellés A. G., Vila B., & Laita E. (2021).  Two latest Cretaceous egg localities in the external sierras (Southern Pyrenees, Huesca Province, NE Spain). Palaeovertebrata - XVIII annual conference of the European Association of Vertebrate Palaeontologists. 44, 120-121. Abstractmoreno-azanza_et_al_2021_eggs_eavp_abstract.pdf

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Jackson, Y., Economos R., Jacobs L., Mateus O., & Gonçalves A. O. (2021).  When Dinosaurs Walked Through Diamonds: Constraining the Age of Early Cretaceous Footprints in Volcanic Crater Sediments. SMU Journal of Undergraduate Research. 6(1), : DOI: https://doi.org/ 10.25172/jour.6.1.1 Available at: https://scholar.smu … Abstractwhen_dinosaurs_walked_through_diamonds.pdf

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Marx, M. P., Mateus O., Polcyn M. J., Schulp A. S., Gonçalves O. A., & Jacobs L. L. (2021).  The cranial anatomy and relationships of Cardiocorax mukulu (Plesiosauria: Elasmosauridae) from Bentiaba, Angola. PLOS ONE. 16(8), e0255773 - ., 2021/08/17: Public Library of Science Abstractmarx_et_al_2021_cardiocorax_angola.pdfWebsite

We report a new specimen of the plesiosaur Cardiocorax mukulu that includes the most complete plesiosaur skull from sub-Saharan Africa. The well-preserved three-dimensional nature of the skull offers rare insight into the cranial anatomy of elasmosaurid plesiosaurians. The new specimen of Cardiocorax mukulu was recovered from Bentiaba, Namibe Province in Angola, approximately three meters above the holotype. The new specimen also includes an atlas-axis complex, seventeen postaxial cervical vertebrae, partial ribs, a femur, and limb elements. It is identified as Cardiocorax mukulu based on an apomorphy shared with the holotype where the cervical neural spine is approximately as long anteroposteriorly as the centrum and exhibits a sinusoidal anterior margin. The new specimen is nearly identical to the holotype and previously referred material in all other aspects. Cardiocorax mukulu is returned in an early-branching or intermediate position in Elasmosauridae in four out of the six of our phylogenetic analyses. Cardiocorax mukulu lacks the elongated cervical vertebrae that is characteristic of the extremely long-necked elasmosaurines, and the broad skull with and a high number of maxillary teeth (28–40) which is characteristic of Aristonectinae. Currently, the most parsimonious explanation concerning elasmosaurid evolutionary relationships, is that Cardiocorax mukulu represents an older lineage of elasmosaurids in the Maastrichtian.