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2020
Park, J. - Y., Lee Y. - N., Currie P. J., Kobayashi Y., Koppelhus E., Barsbold R., Mateus O., Lee S., & Kim S. - H. (2020).  Additional skulls of Talarurus plicatospineus (Dinosauria: Ankylosauridae) and implications for paleobiogeography and paleoecology of armored dinosaurs. Cretaceous Research. 108, 104340. Abstractpark_et_al_2020_additional_skulls_of_talarurus_plicatospineus_dinosauria_final.pdfWebsite

Three new additional skull specimens of Talarurus plicatospineus have been recovered from the Upper Cretaceous (Cenomanian–Santonian) Bayanshiree Formation, of Bayan Shiree cliffs, eastern Gobi Desert, Mongolia. The skulls feature unique characters such as an anteriorly protruded single internarial caputegulum, around 20 flat or concave nasal-area caputegulae surrounded by a wide sulcus, a vertically oriented elongate loreal caputegulum with a pitted surface, an elongate lacrimal caputegulum positioned above the posterodorsal border of the maxilla, two longitudinally arranged large frontoparietal caputegulae surrounded by smaller rhomboid caputegulae, small but elongate medial supraorbital caputegulae, a posterior supraorbital caputegulum that is four times larger than the anterior one, up to three transverse parallel grooves on the dorsal surface of the posterior supraorbital caputegulum, postocular caputegulae along the ventral to posterior rim of the orbit that extend almost to the anteroventral margin of the squamosal horn, a longitudinal furrow tapering towards the apex of the squamosal horn, a lateral nuchal caputegulum four to five times larger than other nuchal caputegulae, and a pterygovomerine keel with a ventral margin that is dorsally positioned to the alveolar ridge. The phylogenetic analysis result showed that Talarurus is sister to the clade that includes the derived Asian ankylosaurines (Saichania chulsanensis, Tarchia kielanae, and Zaraapelta nomadis). It also shows that there was dispersal of ankylosaurines from Asia into western North America before the Cenomanian. Moreover, the rostral differences between Talarurus and Tsagantegia, another ankylosaur from the same formation, suggest possible niche partitioning between these taxa.

2019
Mateus, O., Callapez P. M., Polcyn M. J., Schulp A. S., Gonçalves A. O., & Jacobs L. L. (2019).  The Fossil Record of Biodiversity in Angola Through Time: A Paleontological Perspective. (Huntley, Brian J., Russo, Vladimir, Lages, Fernanda, Ferrand, Nuno, Ed.).Biodiversity of Angola: Science & Conservation: A Modern Synthesis. 53–76.: Springer International Publishing Abstractmateus2019_chapter_thefossilrecordofbiodiversityi.pdf

This chapter provides an overview of the alpha paleobiodiversity of Angola based on the available fossil record that is limited to the sedimentary rocks, ranging in age from Precambrian to the present. The geological period with the highest paleobiodiversity in the Angolan fossil record is the Cretaceous, with more than 80{%} of the total known fossil taxa, especially marine molluscs, including ammonites as a majority among them. The vertebrates represent about 15{%} of the known fauna and about one tenth of them are species firstly described based on specimens from Angola.

Park, J., Lee Y., Currie P. J., Kobayashi Y., Koppelhus E. B., Barsbold R., Lee S., Kim S., & Mateus O. (2019).  Three new skulls of the Late Cretaceous armored dinosaur Talarurus plicatospineus Maleev, 1952. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, Program and Abstracts. 165-166.park_et_al_2019_svp_abstract.pdf
Mateus, O., Callapez P. M., Polcyn M. J., Schulp A. S., Gonçalves A. O., & Jacobs L. L. (2019).  The Fossil Record of Biodiversity in Angola Through Time: A Paleontological Perspective. (Huntley, Brian J., Russo, Vladimir, Lages, Fernanda, Ferrand, Nuno, Ed.).Biodiversity of Angola: Science {&} Conservation: A Modern Synthesis. 53–76., Cham: Springer International Publishing Abstract

This chapter provides an overview of the alpha paleobiodiversity of Angola based on the available fossil record that is limited to the sedimentary rocks, ranging in age from Precambrian to the present. The geological period with the highest paleobiodiversity in the Angolan fossil record is the Cretaceous, with more than 80{%} of the total known fossil taxa, especially marine molluscs, including ammonites as a majority among them. The vertebrates represent about 15{%} of the known fauna and about one tenth of them are species firstly described based on specimens from Angola.

Park, J., Lee Y., Currie P. J., Kobayashi Y., Koppelhus E. B., Barsbold R., Lee S., Kim S., & Mateus O. (2019).  Three new skulls of the Late Cretaceous armored dinosaur Talarurus plicatospineus Maleev, 1952. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, Program and Abstracts. 165-166. Abstract
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2017
Lallensack, J. N., Klein H., Milàn J., Wings O., Mateus O., & Clemmensen L. B. (2017).  Sauropodomorph dinosaur trackways from the Fleming Fjord Formation of East Greenland: Evidence for Late Triassic sauropods. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica. 62(4), 833-843. Abstractlallensack_et_al_2017_-_sauropodomorph_tracks_greenland.pdf

The Late Triassic (Norian–early Rhaetian) Fleming Fjord Formation of central East Greenland preserves a diverse fossil fauna, including both body and trace fossils. Trackways of large quadrupedal archosaurs, although already reported in 1994 and mentioned in subsequent publications, are here described and figured in detail for the first time, based on photogrammetric data collected during fieldwork in 2012. Two trackways can be referred to Eosauropus, while a third, bipedal trackway may be referred to Evazoum, both of which have been considered to represent sauropodomorph dinosaur tracks. Both the Evazoum and the Eosauropus trackways are distinctly larger than other trackways referred to the respective ichnogenera. The trackmaker of the best preserved Eosauropus trackway is constrained using a synapomorphy-based approach. The quadrupedal posture, the entaxonic pes structure, and five weight-bearing digits indicate a derived sauropodiform trackmaker. Other features exhibited by the tracks, including the semi-digitigrade pes and the laterally deflected unguals, are commonly considered synapomorphies of more exclusive clades within Sauropoda. The present trackway documents an early acquisition of a eusauropod-like pes anatomy while retaining a well-developed claw on pedal digit IV, which is reduced in eusauropods. Although unequivocal evidence for sauropod dinosaurs is no older than the Early Jurassic, the present trackway provides evidence for a possible Triassic origin of the group.

Ripple, W. J., Wolf C., Newsome T. M., Galetti M., Alamgir M., Crist E., Mahmoud M. I., Laurance W. F., & other scientist signatories +15 364 (2017).  World Scientists’ Warning to Humanity: A Second Notice. BioScience. bix125. Abstractripple_et_al_2017_scientists_merged_with_supp_material.pdfWebsite

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Lallensack, J. N., Klein H., Milàn J., Wings O., Mateus O., & Clemmensen L. B. (2017).  Sauropodomorph dinosaur trackways from the Fleming Fjord Formation of East Greenland: evidence for Late Triassic sauropods. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica. 62, 833–843., Number 4 Abstract
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Lallensack,  J. N., Klein  H., Milàn  J., Wings  O., Mateus  O., & Clemmensen  L. B. (2017).  Sauropodomorph dinosaur trackways from the Fleming Fjord Formation of East Greenland: evidence for Late Triassic sauropods. AbstractWebsite
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Ripple, W. J., Wolf C., Newsome T. M., Galetti M., Alamgir M., Crist E., Mahmoud M. I., Laurance W. F., & signatoriesscientist +15364 (2017).  World Scientists’ Warning to Humanity: A Second Notice. BioScience. 125, Abstract
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2016
Ceríaco, L. M. P., Gutiérrez E. E., Dubois A., Abdala C. S., Alqarni A. S., Adler K., et al. (2016).  Photography-based taxonomy is inadequate, unnecessary, and potentially harmful for biological sciences. Zootaxa. 4196(3), 435 - 445., 2016 AbstractWebsite
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Moreno-Azanza, M., Gasca J. M., Canudo J. I., Lázaro B. B., & Mateus O. (2016).  The evolution of the ornithischian eggshell: State of the art and perspectives. Abstracts with Programs, the 2016 Annual Meeting, the Palaeontological Society of Japan. 6., Fukui, Japanmoreno_azanza_et_al_2016_the_evolution_of_the_ornithischian_eggshell.pdf
Polcyn, M. J., Bardet N., Amaghzaz M., Gonçalves O. A., Jourani E., Kaddumi H. F., Lindgren J., Mateus O., Meslouhf S., Morais M. L., Pereda-Suberbiola X., Schulp A. S., Vincent P., & Jacobs L. L. (2016).  An extremely derived plioplatecarpine mosasaur from the Maastrichtian of Africa and the Middle East. 5th Triennial Mosasaur Meeting- a global perspective on Mesozoic marine amniotes. 16-20(May 16-20, 2016), May 16-20, 2016., Uppsala, Sweden: Museum of Evolutiom, Uppsala University. Abstractpolcyn_et_al_2016_extremely_derived_mosasaur.pdf

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Marzola, M., Mateus O., Wings O., Klein N., Mìlan J., & L.B.Clemmensen (2016).  The herpetofauna from the Late Triassic of the Jameson Land Basin (East Greenland): review and updates. XIV EAVP Meeting. 182., Haarlem, The Netherlands: XIV EAVP Meeting, Programme and Abstract Book
Leal, A. A., Dionísio A., Braga M. A. S., & Mateus O. (2016).  The long term preservation of Late Jurassic sandstone dinosaur footprints in a museum environment. International Journal of Conservation Science. 7(3), 627-646. AbstractWebsite

This study focuses on the assessment of the degradation processes occurring in three sandstone infills of fossilized Late Jurassic ornithopod tridactyl footprints, found in 2001 in a coastline cliff in Porto das Barcas (Lourinhã, Portugal) and exhibited in a museum display since 2004. These dinosaur footprints present nowadays severe decay phenomena compromising their physical integrity and are leading gradually to their loss of value. The deterioration patterns were recorded, a map of their distribution was prepared and several samples were collected both in the dinosaur footprints and in the coastline cliff. Different analytical procedures were applied such as XRD, FTIR, FESEM and Ion Chromatography. A microclimatic survey was also performed and air temperature and relative humidity was measured during eight months both indoor and also outdoor. The decay patterns observed are a combination intrinsic and extrinsic factors the stone material, namely swelling of clay minerals in the rock matrix (smectite and chlorite-smectite mixed-layer), presence of salts (mainly chlorides), application of past conservation treatments (poly(vinyl) acetate and epoxy resins) and with the museum's indoor thermohygrometric conditions (mainly non-stable hygrometric conditions). This scientific knowledge is therefore essential to the sustainable preservation of this paleontological heritage.

Moreno-Azanza, M., Gasca J. M., Canudo J. I., Lázaro B. B., & Mateus O. (2016).  The evolution of the ornithischian eggshell: State of the art and perspectives. Abstracts with Programs, the 2016 Annual Meeting, the Palaeontological Society of Japan. 6., Fukui, Japan Abstract
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Moreno-Azanza, M., Gasca J. M., Canudo J. I., L\áżaro B. B., & Mateus O. (2016).  The evolution of the ornithischian eggshell: State of the art and perspectives. Abstracts with Programs, the 2016 Annual Meeting, the Palaeontological Society of Japan. 6., Fukui, Japan Abstract
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Moreno-Azanza, M., Gasca J. M., Canudo J. I., Lázaro B. B., & Mateus O. (2016).  The evolution of the ornithischian eggshell: State of the art and perspectives. : Palaeontological Society of Japan Abstract
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Polcyn, M. J., Bardet N., Amaghzaz M., Gon{\c c}alves O. A., Jourani E., Kaddumi H. F., Lindgren J., Mateus O., Meslouhf S., Morais M. L., Pereda-Suberbiola X., Schulp A. S., Vincent P., & Jacobs L. L. (2016).  An extremely derived plioplatecarpine mosasaur from the Maastrichtian of Africa and the Middle East. 5th Triennial Mosasaur Meeting- a global perspective on Mesozoic marine amniotes. 16-20, May 16-20, 2016., Uppsala, Sweden: Museum of Evolutiom, Uppsala University. Abstract

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Polcyn, M. J., Bardet N., Amaghzaz M., Gon\{\c c\}alves O. A., Jourani E., Kaddumi H. F., Lindgren J., Mateus O., Meslouhf S., Morais M. L., Pereda-Suberbiola X., Schulp A. S., Vincent P., & Jacobs L. L. (2016).  An extremely derived plioplatecarpine mosasaur from the Maastrichtian of Africa and the Middle East. 5th Triennial Mosasaur Meeting- a global perspective on Mesozoic marine amniotes. 16-20, May 16-20, 2016., Uppsala, Sweden Abstract
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Polcyn, {M. J. }, Bardet N., Amaghzaz M., Gonçalves {A. O. }, Jourani E., Kaddumi {H. F. }, Lindgren J., Mateus O., Meslouhf S., & Morais {M. L. } (2016).  An extremely derived plioplatecarpine mosasaur from the Maastrichtian of Africa and the Middle East. 32–33. Abstract
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Marzola, M., Mateus O., Wings O., Klein N., M{\`ılan J., & L.B.Clemmensen (2016).  The herpetofauna from the Late Triassic of the Jameson Land Basin (East Greenland): review and updates. XIV EAVP Meeting. 182., Haarlem, The Netherlands: XIV EAVP Meeting, Programme and Abstract Book Abstract
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Marzola, M., Mateus O., Wings O., Klein N., M\{\`ı\}lan J., & L.B.Clemmensen (2016).  The herpetofauna from the Late Triassic of the Jameson Land Basin (East Greenland): review and updates. XIV EAVP Meeting. 182., Haarlem, The Netherlands Abstract
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Leal, A. A., Dion{\'ısio A., Braga M. A. S., & Mateus O. (2016).  The long term preservation of Late Jurassic sandstone dinosaur footprints in a museum environment. International Journal of Conservation Science. 7, 627-646. AbstractWebsite

This study focuses on the assessment of the degradation processes occurring in three sandstone infills of fossilized Late Jurassic ornithopod tridactyl footprints, found in 2001 in a coastline cliff in Porto das Barcas (Lourinhã, Portugal) and exhibited in a museum display since 2004. These dinosaur footprints present nowadays severe decay phenomena compromising their physical integrity and are leading gradually to their loss of value. The deterioration patterns were recorded, a map of their distribution was prepared and several samples were collected both in the dinosaur footprints and in the coastline cliff. Different analytical procedures were applied such as XRD, FTIR, FESEM and Ion Chromatography. A microclimatic survey was also performed and air temperature and relative humidity was measured during eight months both indoor and also outdoor. The decay patterns observed are a combination intrinsic and extrinsic factors the stone material, namely swelling of clay minerals in the rock matrix (smectite and chlorite-smectite mixed-layer), presence of salts (mainly chlorides), application of past conservation treatments (poly(vinyl) acetate and epoxy resins) and with the museum’s indoor thermohygrometric conditions (mainly non-stable hygrometric conditions). This scientific knowledge is therefore essential to the sustainable preservation of this paleontological heritage.

Leal, A. A., Dion\{\'ı\}sio A., Braga M. A. S., & Mateus O. (2016).  The long term preservation of Late Jurassic sandstone dinosaur footprints in a museum environment. International Journal of Conservation Science. 7, 627-646. Abstract
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Leal, A. S., Dionísio A., Sequeira Braga M. A., & Mateus O. (2016).  The long term preservation of late jurassic sandstone dinossaur footprints in a museum environment. International Journal of Conservation Science. 7, 627-646., Number 3 Abstract
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Ceríaco, L. M. P., Gutiérrez E. E., Dubois A., Abdala C. S., Alqarni A. S., Adler K., et al. (2016).  Photography-based taxonomy is inadequate, unnecessary, and potentially harmful for biological sciences. Zootaxa. 4196, 435-445., Number 3 Abstract
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2015
Araújo, R., Polcyn M. J., Lindgren J., Jacobs L. L., Schulp A. S., Mateus O., Gonçalves O. A., & Morais M. - L. (2015).  New aristonectine elasmosaurid plesiosaur specimens from the Early Maastrichtian of Angola and comments on paedomorphism in plesiosaurs. Netherlands Journal of Geosciences. FirstView, 1–16., 2 Abstractaraujo_et_al_2015_paedomorphism-libre.pdfWebsite

ABSTRACT New elasmosaurid plesiosaur specimens are described from the Early Maastrichtian of Angola. Phylogenetic analyses reconstruct the Angolan taxon as an aristonectine elasmosaurid and the sister taxon of an unnamed form of similar age from New Zealand. Comparisons also indicate a close relationship with an unnamed form previously described from Patagonia. All of these specimens exhibit an ostensibly osteologically immature external morphology, but histological analysis of the Angolan material suggests an adult with paedomorphic traits. By extension, the similarity of the Angolan, New Zealand and Patagonian material indicates that these specimens represent a widespread paedomorphic yet unnamed taxon.

Xing, L., Lockley M. G., Marty D., Zhang J., Wang Y., Klein H., McCrea R. T., Buckley L. G., Belvedere M., Mateus O., Gierliński G. D., Piñuela L., Persons, IV S. W., Wang F., Ran H., Dai H., & Xie X. (2015).  An Ornithopod-Dominated Tracksite from the Lower Cretaceous Jiaguan Formation (Barremian–Albian) of Qijiang, South-Central China: New Discoveries, Ichnotaxonomy, Preservation and Palaeoecology. PLoS ONE. 10, e0141059., 10, Number 10: Public Library of Science Abstractlida_et_al_2015_an_ornithopod-dominated_tracksite_from_the.pdfWebsite

The historically-famous Lotus Fortress site, a deep 1.5–3.0-meter-high, 200-meter-long horizonal notch high up in near-vertical sandstone cliffs comprising the Cretaceous Jiaguan Formation, has been known since the 13th Century as an impregnable defensive position. The site is also extraordinary for having multiple tetrapod track-bearing levels, of which the lower two form the floor of part of the notch, and yield very well preserved asseamblages of ornithopod, bird (avian theropod) and pterosaur tracks. Trackway counts indicate that ornithopods dominate (69%) accounting for at least 165 trackmakers, followed by bird (18%), sauropod (10%), and pterosaur (3%). Previous studies designated Lotus Fortress as the type locality of Caririchnium lotus and Wupus agilis both of which are recognized here as valid ichnotaxa. On the basis of multiple parallel trackways both are interpreted as representing the trackways of gregarious species. C. lotus is redescribed here in detail and interpreted to indicate two age cohorts representing subadults that were sometimes bipedal and larger quadrupedal adults. Two other previously described dinosaurian ichnospecies, are here reinterpreted as underprints and considered nomina dubia. Like a growing number of significant tetrapod tracksites in China the Lotus Fortress site reveals new information about the composition of tetrapod faunas from formations in which the skeletal record is sparse. In particular, the site shows the relatively high abundance of Caririchium in a region where saurischian ichnofaunas are often dominant. It is also the only site known to have yielded Wupus agilis. In combination with information from other tracksites from the Jiaguan formation and other Cretaceous formations in the region, the track record is proving increasingly impotant as a major source of information on the vertebrate faunas of the region. The Lotus Fortress site has been developed as a spectacular, geologically-, paleontologically- and a culturally-significant destination within Qijiang National Geological Park.

Young, M. T., Hua S., Steel L., Foffa D., Brusatte S. L., Thüring S., Mateus O., Ruiz-Omeñaca J. I., Havlik P., Lepage Y., & de Andrade M. B. (2015).  Addendum to ‘Revision of the Late Jurassic teleosaurid genus Machimosaurus (Crocodylomorpha, Thalattosuchia)’. Royal Society Open Science. 2, , Number 2: The Royal Society Abstractyoung_et_al_2015_addendum_to_revision_of_the_late_jurassic_teleosaurid_genus_machimosaurus_crocodylomorpha_thalattosuchia.pdfWebsite

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Young, M. T., Hua S., Steel L., Foffa D., Brusatte S. L., Thüring S., Mateus O., Ruiz-Omeñaca J. I., Havlik P., Lepage Y., & De Andrade M. B. (2015).  Addendum to ?Revision of the Late Jurassic teleosaurid genus Machimosaurus (Crocodylomorpha, Thalattosuchia)?. Royal Society Open Science. 2, , Number 2 Abstract
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Xing, L., Lockley M. G., Marty D., Zhang J., Wang Y., Klein H., McCrea R. T., Buckley L. G., Belvedere M., Mateus O., Gierli?ski G. D., Piñuela L., Persons W. S., Wang F., Ran H., Dai H., & Xie X. (2015).  An ornithopod-dominated tracksite from the lower Cretaceous Jiaguan Formation (Barremian-Albian) of Qijiang, South-Central China: New discoveries, ichnotaxonomy, preservation and palaeoecology. PLoS ONE. 10, , Number 10 Abstract
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2014
Leal, A. S., Mateus O., Tomás C., & Dionísio A. (2014).  Decay and conservation trial of Late Jurassic sandstone with dinosaur tracks in a museum environment (Museum of Lourinhã, Portugal). Buletini i Shkencave Gjeologjike. 1(2014), 410. Abstractleal_et_al_2014_cbgassav1-_abstract_dinosaur_footprints__page_410.pdf

Abstract
Late Jurassic dinosaur footprints were found on a coastline cliff in Lourinhã, Porto das Barcas, Lagido do Forno (coordinate 39°14.178’N, 9°20.397’W, Portugal) in June 2001. The locality is characterized by steep cliffs with high slopes that are composed of gray and red sandstones/ siltstones. The location belongs to the successions of Lusitanian Basin representing the Porto Novo Member of the Lourinhã Formation. Three natural infills of tridactyl tracks, possibly ascribed to ornithopod, a bipedal herbivore were found, representing a left foot movement, a right and a left one, respectively. Footprints are 300- 400mm wide and have a height of 330-360mm. The footprints are characterized by round fingers, which are elongated due to some degradation/ erosion. The footprints were collected from the field in 2001 and subsequently cleaned, consolidated and glued in the laboratory of the Museum of Lourinhã before being exhibited in a museum display. Stone matrix was removed and a consolidation product was applied, probably a polyvinyl acetate. The footprint with broken central digit was glued with an epoxy resin, Araldite. Both applied products were confirmed by analysis of μ- FTIR and both presented colour change and detachment surface problems. The footprints have been exposed in the palaeontology hall of the Museum of Lourinhã, Portugal from 2004 without climate controlling. These trace fossils form an important part of the palaeontological collection of Late Jurassic vertebrate fossils from Lourinhã Formation. Presently, it is considered a unique heritage in danger of disappearing due to high decay level of disaggregation of its geological structure. The footprints display several pathologies, such as “Blistering”, “Powdering”, “Exfoliation”’ as well as “Dirt”, “Fracture”’, “Inscriptions”, “Consolidants” and “Adhesives” and are now in very poor conditions. Laboratorial analysed were made to evaluate the presence of salts. Moreover a microclimatic study was conducted inside the museum to evaluate the influence of thermo-hygrometric parameters on the decay processes. The future interventions will depend on the results of consolidation trials that are currently under progress by using stone samples taken from the same layer and location from Porto das Barcas applying different commercial consolidation products.

Leal, S., Mateus O., Tomás C., & Dionisio A. (2014).  Degradation processes and consolidation of Late Jurassic sandstone dinosaur tracks in museum environment (Museum of Lourinhã, Portugal). EGU General Assembly 2014 - Geophysical Research Abstracts. Vol. 16, EGU2014-9026-1, 2014.leal_et_al_2014_tracks_lab_egu2014-9026-1.pdf
Young, M. T., Hua S., Steel L., Foffa D., Brusatte S. L., Thüring S., Mateus O., Ignacio-Ruiz Omeñaca J., Lepage Y., Havilk P., & Andrade M. B. (2014).  Revision of the Late Jurassic teleosaurid genus Machimosaurus (Crocodylomorpha, Thalattosuchia). Royal Society Open Science. 1(140222), 1-42.young_et_al_2014_machimosaurus_crocodylomorph_revision.pdf
Mateus, O. (2014).  Gigantic jurassic predators. (Agile Libre, Ed.).52 Things You Should Know About Palaeontology. 56–57.: Agile Libre Abstract
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Araújo, R., Polcyn M. J., Lindgren J., Jacobs L. L., Schulp A. S., Mateus O., Gon?alves A. O., & Morais M. - L. (2014).  New aristonectine elasmosaurid plesiosaur specimens from the Early Maastrichtian of Angola and comments on paedomorphism in plesiosaurs. Geologie en Mijnbouw/Netherlands Journal of Geosciences. 94, 93-108., Number 1 Abstract
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Young, M. T., Hua S., Steel L., Foffa D., Brusatte S. L., Thüring S., Mateus O., Ruiz-Omeñaca J. I., Havlik P., Lepage Y., & De Andrade M. B. (2014).  Revision of the Late Jurassic teleosaurid genus Machimosaurus (Crocodylomorpha, Thalattosuchia). Royal Society Open Science. 1, , Number 2 Abstract
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2013
Bianucci, G., Miján I., Lambert O., Post K., & Mateus O. (2013).  Bizarre fossil beaked whales (Odontoceti, Ziphiidae) fished from the Atlantic Ocean floor off the Iberian Peninsula. Geodiversitas. 35(1), 105-153. Abstractbianucci_et_al_2013_fossil_beaked_whales_iberian_peninsula.pdf

Forty partial fossil skulls belonging to beaked whales (Cetacea, Odontoceti, Ziphiidae) were collected by trawling and long-line fishing on Neogene (probably Late Early to Middle Miocene) layers of the Atlantic floor off the coasts of Portugal and Spain (Asturias and Galicia). e systematic study of the most diagnostic Iberian specimens, those preserving the rostrum and the dorsal part of the cranium, led to the recognition of two new genera (Globicetus n. gen. and Imocetus n. gen.) and four new species (Choneziphius leidyi n. sp., G. hiberus n. gen., n. sp., I. piscatus n. gen., n. sp., and Tusciziphius atlanticus n. sp.).
Based on the matrix of a previous work, the phylogenetic analysis places all the new taxa in the subfamily Ziphiinae Gray, 1850. More fragmentary specimens are tentatively referred to the genera Caviziphius Bianucci & Post, 2005 and Ziphirostrum du Bus, 1868. Among these new ziphiids, extremely bizarre skull morphologies are observed. In G. hiberus n. gen., n. sp. the proximal portion of the rostrum bears a voluminous premaxillary spheroid. In T. atlanticus n. sp. a medial premaxillary bulge is present on the rostrum; together with asymmetric
rostral maxillary eminences at the rostrum base, this bulge displays various degrees of elevation in different specimens, which may be interpreted as sexual dimorphism. Specimens of I. piscatus n. gen., n. sp. bear two sets of even crests: spur-like rostral maxillary crests and longitudinal maxillary crests laterally bordering a wide and long facial basin. A preliminary macroscopic observation of these elements indicates very dense bones, with a compactness comparable with that of cetacean ear bones. Questioning their function, the high medial rostral elements (the premaxillary spheroid of G. hiberus n. gen., n. sp. and the medial bulge of T. atlanticus n. sp.) remind the huge rostral maxillary crests of adult males of the extant Hyperoodon ampullatus (Forster, 1770). In the latter, the crests are very likely related to head-butting. However, they are made of much more spongy bone than in the fossil taxa studied here, and therefore possibly better mechanically suited for facing impacts. Other interpretations of these unusual bone specializations, related to deep-diving (ballast) and echolocation (sound reflection), fail to explain the diversity of shapes and the hypothetical sexual dimorphism observed in at least part of the taxa. e spur-like rostral maxillary crests and long maxillary crests limiting the large facial basin in I. piscatus n. gen., n. sp. and the excrescences on the maxilla at the rostrum base in Choneziphius spp. are instead interpreted as areas of origin for rostral and facial muscles, acting on the nasal passages, blowhole, and melon. From a palaeobiogeographic point of view, the newly described taxa further emphasize the differences in the North Atlantic (including Iberian Peninsula) and South African Neogene ziphiid faunal lists. Even if the stratigraphic context is poorly understood, leaving open the question of the geological age for most of the dredged specimens, these differences in the composition of cold to temperate northern and southern hemisphere fossil ziphiid faunas may be explained by a warm-water equatorial barrier.

2010
2009
Eberth, D. A., Kobayashi Y., Lee Y. - N., Mateus O., Therrien F., Zelenitsky D. K., & Norell M. A. (2009).  Assignment of Yamaceratops dorngobiensis and associated redbeds at Shine Us Khudag (eastern Gobi, Dorngobi Province, Mongolia) to the redescribed Javkhlant Formation (Upper Cretaceous). Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 29, 295–302., mar, Number 1: Informa {UK} Limited AbstractWebsite
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Eberth, D. A., Kobayashi Y., Lee Y. N., Mateus O., Therrien F., Zelenitsky D. K., & Norell M. A. (2009).  Assignment of Yamaceratops dorngobiensis and Associated Redbeds at Shine Us Khudag (Eastern Gobi, Dorngobi Province, Mongolia) to the Redescribed Javkhlant Formation (Upper Cretaceous). Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 29, 295-302., Jan: Univ Nova Lisboa, Hokkaido Univ, Museu Lourinha, Amer Museum Nat Hist, Korean Inst Geosci & Mineral Resources, Royal Tyrell Museum, Royal Tyrell Museum, Univ Calgary Abstracteberth_et_al-2009-__assignment_of_yamaceratops_dorngobiensis_and_associated_redbeds_at_shine_us_khudag_eastern_gobi_dorngobi_province_mongolia_to_the_redescribed_javkhlant_formation_upper_cretaceous_javkhlant_fm.pdf

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authors listed, N. (2009).  International Conference on the Geological Collections and Museums: mission and management.. (Brandao J, Callapez P, Mateus O, Castro P, Ed.). , Jan: Journal of Paleontological Techniques 5 (special volume) Abstract
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2008
Mateus, O. (2008).  Fósseis de transição, elos perdidos, fósseis vivos e espécies estáveis. (Levy, et al, Ed.).Evolução: História e Argumentos. 77-96., Lisboa: Esfera do Caosmateus_2008_evolucao_fosseis_de_transicao.pdf
2006
Sander, P. M., Mateus O., Laven T., & Knotschke N. (2006).  Bone histology indicates insular dwarfism in a new Late Jurassic sauropod dinosaur. Nature. 441, 739-741., Jan Abstractsander_mateus_et_al_2006_europasaurus_sauropod_histology_drwarfism_nature.pdf

Sauropod dinosaurs were the largest animals ever to inhabit the land, with truly gigantic forms in at least three lineages1, 2, 3. Small species with an adult body mass less than five tonnes are very rare4, 5, and small sauropod bones generally represent juveniles. Here we describe a new diminutive species of basal macronarian sauropod, Europasaurus holgeri gen. et sp. nov., and on the basis of bone histology we show it to have been a dwarf species. The fossils, including excellent skull material, come from Kimmeridgian marine beds of northern Germany6, 7, and record more than 11 individuals of sauropods 1.7 to 6.2 m in total body length. Morphological overlap between partial skeletons and isolated bones links all material to the same new taxon. Cortical histology of femora and tibiae indicates that size differences within the specimens are due to different ontogenetic stages, from juveniles to fully grown individuals. The little dinosaurs must have lived on one of the large islands around the Lower Saxony basin8. Comparison with the long-bone histology of large-bodied sauropods suggests that the island dwarf species evolved through a decrease in growth rate from its larger ancestor.

Sander, P. M., Mateus O., Laven T., & Knötschke N. (2006).  Bone histology indicates insular dwarfism in a new Late Jurassic sauropod dinosaur. Nature. 441, 739-741. Abstract
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Martin Sander, P., Mateus O., Laven T., & Knötschke N. (2006).  Bone histology indicates insular dwarfism in a new Late Jurassic sauropod dinosaur. Nature. 441, 739-741., Number 7094 Abstract
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2004
Mateus, O., Laven T., & Knotschke N. (2004).  A dwarf between giants? A new late Jurassic sauropod from Germany. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 23, 90A., Number suppl. to 3mateus_et_al_2004_a_dwarf_between_giants-_a_new_late_jurassic_sauropod_from_germany_svp.pdfWebsite