Publications

Export 635 results:
Sort by: [ Author  (Asc)] Title Type Year
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z 
M
Mateus, O., Milàn J., Romano M., & Whyte M. A. (2011).  New finds of stegosaur tracks from the Upper Jurassic Lourinhã formation, Portugal. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica. 56, 651-658., Number 3 Abstract
n/a
Mateus, O., & Antunes M. T. (2001).  Draconyx loureiroi, a new camptosauridae (Dinosauria, Ornithopoda) from the Late Jurassic of Lourinhã, Portugal. Annales de Paléontologie. 87, 61–73., jan, Number 1: Elsevier {BV} AbstractWebsite
n/a
Mateus, O. (2009).  New specimens of Angolasaurus bocagei and comments on the early radiations of plioplatecarpine mosasaurs. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 29, 165A., 1, Number 3: Taylor & Francis Abstract

NEW SPECIMENS OF ANGOLASAURUS BOCAGEI AND COMMENTS ON THE EARLY RADIATIONS OF PLIOPLATECARPINE MOSASAURS POLCYN, Michael, SMU, Dallas, TX, USA; JACOBS, Louis, SMU, Dallas, TX, USA; MATEUS, Octávio, Museu da Lourinhã, Lourinhã, Portugal; SCHULP, Anne, Natuurhistorisch Museum Maastricht, Maastricht, Netherlands New, well preserved material of the Turonian mosasaur Angolasaurus bocagei from the Tadi Beds of the Itombe Formation in northern Angola, allows detailed redescription of its morphology and reassessment of its phylogenetic relationships. Angolasaurus had been previously referred to the genus Platecarpus; however, phylogenetic analysis confirms the valid taxonomic status of A. bocagei, and reconstructs that taxon within a clade that also includes the genera Selmasaurus and Ectenosaurus. These forms are united by an elaborated infrastapedial process of the quadrate and a unique ridge-like descending process of the parietal forming the supraoccipital articulation, but also retain a relatively plesiomorphic configuration of the braincase. That clade is united with all other plioplatecarpines by a number of derived characters including the presence of a novel basicranial circulation pattern. In Africa, North and South America, early plioplatecarpines are known by the Middle Turonian and Angolasaurus and closely related forms appear by the Upper Turonian. Selmasaurus and Ectenosaurus are a rare faunal component of the Santonian and Campanian of North America. Platecarpus planifrons appears in the Coniacian of North America and represents the plesiomorphic condition of the clade containing the remaining species of Platecarpus and Plioplatecarpus, that appears in the Santonian and persist until the end of the Cretaceous, reaching global distribution. The temporal and geographic distribution of these radiations suggest influence of paleogeography and eustatic sea levels.

Mateus, O. (1999).  Monofilia dos dinossauros e Origem das Aves: Serão as aves dinossauros?. Actas do II Congresso de Ornitologia. 184–185., Lisboa Abstract
n/a
Mateus, O. (1998).  Serão as aves dinossauros?. CiênciaJ. 6, 5. Abstract
n/a
Mateus, O., & Azinheira C. (1996).  Passeriformes nidificantes da Ribeira da Viscossa (Évora). (Spea, Ed.).Livro de resumos do I Congresso de Ornitologia. Abstract
n/a
Mateus, O., Callapez {P. M. }, & Puértolas-Pascual E. (2017).  The oldest Crocodylia? a new eusuchian from the Late Cretaceous (Cenomanian) of Portugal. 160. Abstract
n/a
Mateus, O., Dyke G., Motchurova-Dekova N., Ivanov P., & Kamenov G. D. (2008).  The Bulgarian dinosaur: did it exist? European late Cretaceous ornithomimosaurs. 56th Symposium of Vertebrate Palaeontology and Comparative Anatomy. 47., Dublin Abstract

For historical and geological reasons the dinosaurian fossil record from central Europe is little known. Here we describe and interpret a portion of a left humerus from the Upper Maastrichtian of Vratsa district in north-western Bulgaria. This bone is the first known record of a dinosaur from Bulgaria; it is certainly a theropod, probably an ornithomimosaur. We discuss the fossil record of other similar fossils of theropod dinosaurs, in particular other problematic remains from the Maastrichtian of Belgium. Rare Earth Element (REE) analysis combined with strontium (Sr) isotope data demonstrate that the Bulgarian dinosaur was initially fossilised in a terrestrial environment and then later re-worked into Late Maastrichtian marine sediments.

Mateus, O., Jacobs L. L., Polcyn M. J., Schulp A. S., Neto A. B., & Antunes M. T. (2008).  Dinosaur and turtles from the Turonian of Iembe, Angola. Livro de Resumos de Tercer Congreso Latinoamericano de Paleontología de Vertebrados. 156–156., Neuquén, Argentina Abstract
n/a
Mateus, O. (2016).  Exemplos bizarros de evolução em dinossauros e alguns casos portugueses. Do Big Bang ao Homem. 81-95., Porto Abstract
n/a
Mateus, O., Marzola M., Schulp A. S., Jacobs L. L., Polcyn M. J., Pervov V., Gonçalves A. O., & Morais M. L. (2017).  Angolan ichnosite in a diamond mine shows the presence of a large terrestrial mammaliamorph, a crocodylomorph, and sauropod dinosaurs in the Early Cretaceous of Africa. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology. 471, 220 - 232. Abstractmateus_et_al_2017_angolan_ichnosite_catoca.pdfWebsite

Abstract We report here new and the first mammaliamorph tracks from the Early Cretaceous of Africa. The tracksite, that also bears crocodylomorph and sauropod dinosaurian tracks, is in the Catoca diamond mine, Lunda Sul Province, Angola. The mammaliamorph tracks have a unique morphology, attributed to Catocapes angolanus ichnogen. et ichnosp. nov. and present an anterolateral projection of digit I and V. The tracks with an average length of 2.7 cm and width of 3.2 cm are the largest mammaliamorph tracks known from the Early Cretaceous unmatched in size in the skeletal fossil record. The crocodylomorph trackways and tracks are attributed to Angolaichnus adamanticus ichnogen. et ichnosp. nov. (‘ichnofamily’ Batrachopodidae) and present a functionally pentadactyl pes, an extremely outwardly rotated handprint, and an unusual tetradactyl and plantigrade manus. One medium-sized sauropod dinosaur trackway preserved skin impressions of a trackmaker with stride length of 1.6 m; a second is that of a small-sized sauropod trackmaker with a pace length of 75 cm.

Mateus, O. (2012).  Age and paleoecology of mosasaurs and plesiosaurs from the Late Cretaceous South Atlantic margin at Bentiaba, Angola. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, Program and Abstracts, 2012. 180.. 180–181., 1 Abstract
n/a
Mateus, O., & Milan J. (2010).  A diverse Upper Jurassic dinosaur ichnofauna from central-west Portugal. Lethaia. 43, 245–257., Jan Abstractmateus__milan_2010_-_diverse_l_j_ichnofauna_from_lourinha_fm_portugal.pdfWebsite

A newly discovered dinosaur track-assemblage from the Upper Jurassic Lourinha˜ Formation (Lusitanian Basin, central-west Portugal), comprises medium- to large-sized sauropod tracks with well-preserved impressions of soft tissue anatomy, stegosaur tracks and tracks from medium- to large-sized theropods. The 400-m-thick Lourinha˜ Formation consists of mostly aluvial sediments, deposited during the early rifting of the Atlantic Ocean in the Kimmeridgian and Tithonian. The stratigraphic succession shows several shifts between flood-plain mud and fluvial sands that favour preservation and fossilization of tracks. The studied track-assemblage is found preserved as natural casts on the underside of a thin bivalve-rich carbonate bed near the Tithonian–Kimmeridgian boundary. The diversity of the tracks from the new track assemblage is compared with similar faunas from the Upper Jurassic of Asturias, Spain and the Middle Jurassic Yorkshire Coast of England. The Portuguese record of Upper Jurassic dinosaur body fossils show close similarity to the track fauna from the Lourinha˜ Formation.

Mateus, O., Mateus O., Jacobs L. L., Schulp A. S., Polcyn M. J., Tavares T. S., Neto A. B., Morais M. L., & Antunes M. T. (2011).  Angolatitan adamastor, a new sauropod dinosaur and the first record from Angola. Anais da Academia Brasileira de Ciências. Abstract
n/a
Mateus, O., & Antunes M. T. (2002).  Novos vestígios de dinossauros saurópodes do Jurássico Superior da Lourinhã (Portugal). Congresso Ibérico de Herpetologia. , Évora Abstract
n/a
Mateus, O. (2014).  Preliminary Magnetostratigraphy for the Jurassic–Cretaceous Transition in Porto da Calada, Portugal. (Rogério Rocha, João Pais, Kullberg, {José Carlos}, Stanley Finney, Ed.).STRATI 2013:First International Congress on Stratigraphy At the Cutting Edge of Stratigraphy. 873–877., 1: Springer International Publishing Switzerland Abstract

We present a stratigraphic log supporting a preliminary magnetostratigraphy of a Tithonian–Berriasian section in Porto da Calada (Portugal). Based on biostratigraphy and reversed and normal magnetostratigraphy, the location of the Tithonian–Berriasian boundary is tentatively located at ca. 52 m, not in disagreement with former proposals. Due to the occurrence of later remagnetization (diagenesis), the magnetostratigraphic definition of the Tithonian–Berriasian section at the Cabo Espichel (Portugal) location was not able to be established

Mateus, O. (2009).  Colecções paleontológicas do Museu da Lourinhã (Portugal) / Paleontological collections of the Museum of Lourinhã (Portugal). (Unknown Unknown, Ed.).Journal of Paleontological Techniques. 18–19.., 1 Abstract
n/a
Mateus, O., Marzola M., Schulp A. S., Jacobs L. L., Polcyn M. J., Pervov V., Gonçalves A. O. {\'ı}mpio, & Morais M. L. (2017).  Angolan ichnosite in a diamond mine shows the presence of a large terrestrial mammaliamorph, a crocodylomorph, and sauropod dinosaurs in the Early Cretaceous of Africa. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology. 471, 220–232., apr: Elsevier {BV} AbstractWebsite
n/a
Mateus, I., Mateus H., Antunes M. T., Mateus O., Taquet P., Ribeiro V., & Manuppella G. (1997).  Couvée, oeufs et embryons d'un dinosaure théropode du Jurassique supérieur de Lourinhã (Portugal). Comptes Rendus de l'Académie des Sciences-Series IIA-Earth and Planetary Science. 325, 71–78., Number 1 Abstract
n/a
Mateus, O., Walen A., & Antunes M. T. (2006).  The large theropod fauna of the Lourinhã Formation (Portugal) and its similarity to the Morrison Formation, with a description of a new species of Allosaurus. New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science Bulletin. 36, 123-129. Abstractmateus_walen_antunes_-_2006_-_the_large_theropod_fauna_of_the_lourinha_formation__portugal__and_its_similarity_to_the_morrison_formation__with_a_description_of_a_new_species_of_allosaurus.pdf

Late Jurassic theropod dinosaurs have been known in Portugal since 1863 but only now are they being fully understood, with the recognition of genera such as Allosaurus, Aviatyrannis, Ceratosaurus, Lourinhanosaurus, and Torvosaurus from the Lourinhã and Alcobaça Formations (Kimmeridgian/Tithonian). Ceratosaurus dentisulcatus can now be reported from Portugal. It represents the only occurrence of this species outside the Morrison Formation.
New cranial elements confirm the presence of Torvosaurus tanneri, in Portugal. Torvosaurus was the largest Late Jurassic land carnivore. New postcranial and cranial elements allow the erection of a new species from Portugal, Allosaurus europaeus n.sp. The theropod assemblage of Portugal is similar to that of the Morrison Formation.

Mateus, O., Dyke G., Motchurova-Dekova N., Ivanov P., & Kamenov G. D. (2008).  The Bulgarian dinosaur: did it exist? European late Cretaceous ornithomimosaurs. 56th Symposium of Vertebrate Palaeontology and Comparative Anatomy. 47., Dublin Abstract
n/a
Mateus, O., Mannion P. D., & Upchurch P. (2014).  Zby atlanticus, a new turiasaurian sauropod (Dinosauria, Eusauropoda) from the Late Jurassic of Portugal. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 34, 618-634., Number 3 Abstract
n/a
Mateus, O., Araújo R., Natário C., & Castanhinha R. (2011).  A new specimen of the theropod dinosaur Baryonyx from the early Cretaceous of Portugal and taxonomic validity of Suchosaurus. Zootaxa. 2827, 54–68., Jan Abstractmateus_et_al_2011_a_new_specimen_of_the_theropod_dinosaur_baryonyx_from_the_early_cretaceous_of_portugal_and_taxonomic_validity_of_suchosaurus.pdf

Although the Late Jurassic of Portugal has provided abundant dinosaur fossils, material from the Early Cretaceous is scarce. This paper reports new cranial and postcranial material of the theropod dinosaur Baryonyx walkeri found in the Barremian (Papo Seco Formation) of Portugal. This specimen, found at Praia das Aguncheiras, Cabo Espichel, consists of a partial dentary, isolated teeth, pedal ungual, two calcanea, presacral and caudal vertebrae, fragmentary pubis, scapula, and rib fragments. It represents the most complete spinosaurid yet discovered in the Iberian Peninsula and the most complete dinosaur from the Early Cretaceous of Portugal. This specimen is confidently identified as a member of Baryonychinae due to the presence of conical teeth with flutes and denticles in a dentary rosette. The specimen ML1190 shares the following characteristics with Baryonyx walkeri: enamel surface with small (nearly vertical) wrinkles, variable denticle size along the carinae, 6–7 denticles per mm, wrinkles forming a 45 degree angle near the carinae, and tooth root longer than crown. In addition, dubious taxa based on teeth morphology such as Suchosaurus cultridens (Owen, 1840–1845), and Suchosaurus girardi (Sauvage 1897–98; Antunes & Mateus 2003) are discussed, based on comparisons with well-known material such as Baryonyx walkeri Charig & Milner, 1986. Suchosaurus cultridens and S. girardi are considered as nomina dubia due to the lack of diagnostic apomorphies, but both specimens are referred to Baryonychinae incertae sedis.

Mateus, O. (2011).  Plesiosaur structural extreme from the Maastrichtian of Angola. Abstracts of the 71st Annual Meeting of the Society of Vertebrate Paleontology. 63., 1 Abstract
n/a
Mateus, O., & Jacinto J. J. (2002).  Contribuição para o estudo de Hemidactylus turcicus (Reptilia, Gekkonidae): ritmos de actividade e microhabitat em Évora, Portugal. VII Congresso Luso-Espanhol de Herpetologia. 136–136., Évora Abstract
n/a
Mateus, O., & Antunes M. T. (2000).  Torvosaurus sp. (Dinosauria : Theropoda) in the Late Jurassic of Portugal. Livro de Resumos do I Congresso Ibérico de Paleontologia, pp: 115-117. 115-117. Abstractmateus_antunes_2000_torvosaurus_sp.dinosauria_-_theropoda_in_the_late_jurassic_of_portugal.pdf

n/a

Mateus, O., and Dinis J., Cunha P. P., & and (2017).  The Lourinhã Formation: the Upper Jurassic to lower most Cretaceous of the Lusitanian Basin, Portugal – landscapes where dinosaurs walked. Ciências da Terra - Earth Sciences Journal. 19, 75–97., sep, Number 1: {NOVA}.{ID}.{FCT} AbstractWebsite
n/a
Mateus, O., Taquet P., Antunes M. T., Mateus H., & Ribeiro V. (1998).  Theropod dinosaur nest from Lourinhã, Portugal. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 18, 61., Number (Suppl. 3) Abstract
n/a
Mateus, O. (2008).  Checklist for Late Jurassic reptiles and amphibians from Portugal. Livro de Resumos do X Congresso Luso-Espanhol de Herpetologia. 55., Coimbra Abstract
n/a
Mateus, O. (2005).  Dinossauros do Jurássico Superior de Portugal, com destaque para os saurísquios. Universidade Nova de Lisboa. , Lisboa
Mateus, O., Carrano M. T., & Taquet P. (2012).  Osteology of the embryonic theropods from the Late Jurassic of Paimogo, Portugal. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, Program and Abstracts, 2012, p.137. ISSN 1937-2809. 137.mateus_et_al_2012_embryos_paimogo_portugal_svp_2012_abstract_book_meeting_abstracts.pdf.pdf
Mateus, O. (2007).  Notes and review of the ornithischian dinosaurs of Portugal. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 27(suppl. to 3), 114. Abstract
n/a
Mateus, O. (2011).  Evolutionary major trends of ornithopod dinosaurs teeth. (Unknown Unknown, Ed.).Dinosaurios y paleontología desde América Latina. 25–31., 1: EDIUNC, Editorial de la Universidad Nacional de Cuyo Abstract
n/a
Mateus, O. (2014).  Comparison of modern and fossil Crocodylomorpha eggs and contribution to the oophylogeny of Amniota. Annual Meeting of the European Association of Vertebrate Palaeontologists. XII Annual Meeting of the European Association of Vertebrate Palaeontologists, 192., 1 Abstract
n/a
Mateus, O. (2010).  Physical drivers of evolution and the history of the marine tetrapod fauna of Angola. –, , 1 Abstract

Modern marine species populations are often evaluated in terms of bottom-up, resource limited structure, or top-down, predator controlled structure. In a larger timeframe, investiga- tion of physical drivers in marine tetrapod evolution relies on the recognition of patterns and the correlation in timing of physical events with biotic change. However, it has been dem- onstrated through the study of fossil cetaceans that a broader deep-time perspective within a top-down or bottom-up framework is informative. Here we examine the fossil record of &UHWDFHRXV PDULQH WHWUDSRGV LQ $QJROD WR GLVFHUQ SDWWHUQV WKDW PD\ UHÀHFW SK\VLFDO GULYHUV RI evolution, and that are also relevant to population structure. In modern marine ecosystems, GLVWULEXWLRQ SDWWHUQV UHÀHFWLQJ SULPDU\ SURGXFWLYLW\ DUH LQGLFDWLYH RI ERWWRP?XS FRQWURO? ,Q the fossil record, productivity-controlled distribution patterns can also be perceived. Physi- cal parameters resulting in environmental stability, sea-level change, oceanic anoxic events, paleoclimate, and paleogeography are examined in comparison with taxonomic diversity and life history patterns. Mosasaurs originated during a time of high global temperatures and shallow temperature gradients. As upper-trophic-level species of modest size and plesiopedal limb structure (capable of terrestrial locomotion), early mosasaurs were subject to both top- down and bottom up pressures. The attainment of larger size coupled with emigration and biogeographic distribution in areas of high primary productivity, and niche differentiation VKRZQ E\ 13C values, indicate bottom-up pressures. Productivity along the African coast since the formation of the Atlantic Ocean facilitated the co-occurrence of diverse marine tetrapods through time, and has culminated today in the Benguela large marine ecosystem. Just as the current Benguela ecosystem has tetrapod species populations dominated by both bottom-up (cetaceans) and top-down strategies (sea birds and pinnipeds), so too did the Cre- taceous community, with mosasaurs and plesiosaurs having predominantly bottom-up popu- lation structure, while sea turtles and pterosaurs were more subject to top-down pressures.

Mateus, O., Butler R. J., Brusatte S. L., Whiteside J. H., & Steyer S. J. (2014).  The first phytosaur (Diapsida, Archosauriformes) from the Late Triassic of the Iberian Peninsula. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 34(4), 970-975.mateus_et_al_2014_first_phytosaur_algarve_portugal_jvp.pdfWebsite
Mateus, O., & Antunes M. T. (2000).  On the presence of Ceratosaurus sp. (Dinosauria: Theropoda) in the Late Jurassic of Portugal. Abstract volume of the 31st International Geological Congress. , Rio de Janeiro, Brazil Abstract
n/a
Mateus, O., Laven T., & Knotschke N. (2004).  A dwarf between giants? A new late Jurassic sauropod from Germany. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 23, 90A., Number suppl. to 3mateus_et_al_2004_a_dwarf_between_giants-_a_new_late_jurassic_sauropod_from_germany_svp.pdfWebsite
Mateus, O., Maidment S. C. R., & Christiansen N. A. (2009).  A new long-necked {'}sauropod-mimic{'} stegosaur and the evolution of the plated dinosaurs. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences. 276, 1815-1821., Number 1663 Abstract
n/a
Mateus, O., & Marzola M. (2014).  Dinosaur taphonomy in the Lourinhã Formation (Late Jurassic, Portugal). 7th International Meeting on Taphonomy and Fossilization, Taphos 2014. 60-61., Ferrara, Italymateus__marzola_2014_lourinha_taphonomy_ferrara_taphonomy_meeting_2014.pdf
Mateus, O. (1998).  Dinossauros Portugueses. Caderno de resumos do I Congresso de Estudantes de Biologia. 13–13., Évora Abstract
n/a
Mateus, O., & Milan J. (2008).  Ichnological evidence for giant ornithopod dinosaurs in the Upper Jurassic Lourinhã Formation, Portugal. Oryctos. 8, 47-52. Abstractmateus_and_milan_2008_ichnological_evidence_for_giant_ornithopod_big_ornithopod_track_from_u_j_lourinha_fm_portugal.pdfWebsite

The Upper Jurassic Lourinhã Formation (Lusitanian Basin, Portugal) contains a diverse dinosaur fauna comprising theropods, sauropods, stegosaurs, ankylosaurs and several genera of ornithopods. The sedimentology in the area favours preservation of tracksways, and tracks from most of the dinosaurs are also represented by skeletal remains. During fieldwork in the summer of 2003 a new, large, tridactyl track was found at the beach of Vale Frades, approximately 6 km north of Lourinhã (central west Portugal). The track was found together with a stegosaur track on a clay bed exposed within the intertidal zone. Due to the immediate danger of erosion, the track was collected and is now on display at Museu da Lourinhã. The track is 70 cm long and 69 cm wide, the toes are short and broad, with indications of short blunt claws, and there is a high angle of divarication between the outer digits. The shape and dimensions of the track identifies it as deriving from an ornithopod dinosaur with an estimated hip height around three metres. Although very large ornithopods are known from the Cretaceous, the largest known Jurassic ornithopod is Camptosaurus from North America, and the largest known from Portugal is the camptosaurid Draconyx loureiroi. Neither of these reached the body size suggested by the new track. So far the track described herein is the only evidence for a Jurassic ornithopod of that size.

Mateus, O., Maidment S. C. R., & Christiansen N. A. (2008).  A new specimen aff. Dacentrurus armatus (Dinosauria: Stegosauridae) from the Late Jurassic of Portugal. Livro de Resumos de Tercer Congreso Latinoamericano de Paleontología de Vertebrados. 157–157., Neuquén, Argentina Abstract
n/a
Mateus, O., & Antunes M. T. (2008).  Landmarks in the history of dinosaur paleontology in Portugal, focusing on skeletal remains. Abstract volume, Dinosaurs - A Historical Perspective, 6-7 may 2008. , London Abstract

Portugal has been providing dinosaur remains since, at least, 1863. The 18th century tiles depicting the legend of Our Lady in Cabo Espichel are probably the oldest known dinosaur track illustration. To our knowledge, the first remains found in Portugal were theropod teeth collected near Porto das Barcas (Late Jurassic of Lourinhã) in June 20th, 1863 by the geologist Carlos Ribeiro (1813-1882). The first dinosaur paper was written by Henri Sauvage (1842-1917) published in 1896. All remains collected since 19th century were gathered in a work signed by Albert de Lapparent (1905-1975) and Georges Zbyszewski (1909-1999 ) titled Les Dinosauriens du Portugal (1957) that was a significant milestone in the Portuguese dinosaur paleontology and gives the state-of-the-art by the time. Several dinosaurs are named, described, depicted and mapped in that monograph. The first track record is given by Jacinto Pedro Gomes (1844-1916) in 1916. Concerning the non-scientific literature referring to dinosaurs, in 1884 the newspaper Occidente reports the Bernissart findings in Belgium. In the 1959 occurs the first visit to Portugal of Walter Kühne (1911-1991) from the Free University of Berlin. Further visits and work granted the access to the Guimarota Mine and other Late Jurassic deposits in the 1960’s, 70’s and 80’s with a high number of publications. In the 1980’s and early 1990’s starts a progressive era for dinosaur paleontology in Portugal with the works of Peter Galton, Miguel Telles Antunes, the Natural History Museum, the Museum of Lourinhã and the New University of Lisbon, Oliver Rauhut, and others.

Mateus, O., & Castanhinha R. (2008).  PaleoAngola- Predadores de um oceano primitivo. National Geographic Portugal. 8, 26-33., Number 91 Abstract
n/a