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Hendrickx, C., Mateus O., & Araújo R. (2015).  The dentition of megalosaurid theropods. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica. 60(3), 627–642. Abstracthendrickx_et_al_2015_theropod_teeth_app.pdfWebsite

Theropod teeth are particularly abundant in the fossil record and frequently reported in the literature. Yet, the dentition of many theropods has not been described comprehensively, omitting details on the denticle shape, crown ornamentation and enamel texture. This paucity of information has been particularly striking in basal clades, thus making identification of isolated teeth difficult, and taxonomic assignments uncertain. We here provide a detailed description of the dentition of Megalosauridae, and a comparison to and distinction from superficially similar teeth of all major theropod clades. Megalosaurid dinosaurs are characterized by a mesial carina facing mesiolabially in most mesial teeth, centrally positioned carinae on both most mesial and lateral crowns, a mesial carina terminating above the cervix, and short to well-developed interdenticular sulci between distal denticles. A discriminant analysis performed on a dataset of numerical data collected on the teeth of 62 theropod taxa reveals that megalosaurid teeth are hardly distinguishable from other theropod clades with ziphodont dentition. This study highlights the importance of detailing anatomical descriptions and providing additional morphometric data on teeth with the purpose of helping to identify isolated theropod teeth in the future.

Mateus, O. (2014).  Degradation processes and consolidation of Late Jurassic sandstone dinosaur tracks in museum environment (Museum of Lourinhã, Portugal). Geophysical Research Abstracts. Geophysical Research Abstracts, EGU2014–9026–1, 2014., 1 Abstract
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Leal, S., Mateus O., Tomás C., & Dionisio A. (2014).  Degradation processes and consolidation of Late Jurassic sandstone dinosaur tracks in museum environment (Museum of Lourinhã, Portugal). EGU General Assembly 2014 - Geophysical Research Abstracts. Vol. 16, EGU2014-9026-1, 2014.leal_et_al_2014_tracks_lab_egu2014-9026-1.pdf
Hayashi, S., Carpenter K., Watabe M., Mateus O., & Barsbold R. (2008).  Defensive weapons of thyreophoran dinosaurs: histological comparisons and structural differences in spikes and clubs of ankylosaurs and stegosaurs. 28 (3, Supplement), 89A-90A. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 28, 89-90., Number Suppl. to 3 Abstract
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Hayashi, S., Carpenter K., Watabe M., Mateus O., & Barsbold R. (2008).  Defensive weapons of thyreophoran dinosaurs: histological comparisons and structural differences in spikes and clubs of ankylosaurs and stegosaurs. 28 (3, Supplement), 89A-90A. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 28, 89–90., Number Suppl. to Abstract
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Hayashi, S., Carpenter K., Watabe M., Mateus O., & Barsbold R. (2008).  Defensive weapons of thyreophoran dinosaurs: histological comparisons and structural differences in spikes and clubs of ankylosaurs and stegosaurs. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 28(3, Supplement), 89A-90A., Number Suppl. to 3 Abstracthayashi_et_al_2008_histology_stegosaurs_defensive_weapons_of_thyreophoran_dinosaurs-_histological_comparisons_and_structural_differences_in_spikes_and_clubs_of_ankylosaurs_and_stegosaurs.pdfWebsite

Thyreophoran dinosaurs have spike- and club-shaped osteoderms probably used for defensive weapons. The structural and histological variations have been little known. Here, we provide the comparisons of the internal structures in defensive weapons of ankylosaurs and stegosaurs, using spikes of a polacanthid (Gastonia) and a nodosaurid (Edmontonia), clubs of ankylosaurids (Saichania and Ankylosauridae indet. from Canada), and spikes of stegosaurids (Stegosaurus and Dacentrurus), which sheds light on understandings of evolutionary history and functional implications of defensive weapons in thyreophorans. In ankylosaurs, the structural and histological features of spikes and clubs are similar with those of small osteoderms in having thin compact bones, thick cancellous bones with large vascular canals, and abundant collagen fibers. A previous study demonstrated that each of three groups of ankylosaurs (polacanthid, nodosaurid, and ankylosaurid) has distinct characteristic arrangements of collagen fibers in small osteoderms. This study shows that spikes and clubs of ankylosaurs maintain the same characteristic features for each group despite of the differences in shapes and sizes. Conversely, the spike-shaped osteoderms in primitive (Dacentrurus) and derived (Stegosaurus) stegosaurids have similar structure to each other and are significantly different from the other types of stegosaur osteoderms (throat bony ossicles and plates) in having thick compact bones with a medullary cavity. These lack abundant collagen fibers unlike ankylosaur osteoderms. The spikes of ankylosaurs and stegosaurs are similar in shape, but their structural and histological features are different in having unique structures of collagen fibers for ankylosaurs and thick compact bones for stegosaurs, providing enough strength to have large spikes and to use them as defensive weapons. Although the shapes of ankylosaur clubs are different from spikes, the internal structures are similar, suggesting that ankylosaurs maintain similar structures despite of different shapes in osteoderms. These results indicate that ankylosaurs and stegosaurs used different strategies independently to evolve defensive weapons.

Jacobs, L. L., Polcyn M. J., Mateus O., & Schulp A. S. (2023).  Deep time conservation paleobiology of the Atlantic jigsaw puzzle and the future of the southwestern Angolan coast. Bulletin of the Florida Museum of Natural History. 60(2), 90.: In: Abstracts of the 2nd Conservation Paleobiology Symposium. https://doi … Abstractjacobs_et_al_2023_jigsaw.pdf

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Leal, A. S., Mateus O., Tomás C., & Dionísio A. (2014).  Decay and conservation trial of Late Jurassic sandstone with dinosaur tracks in a museum environment (Museum of Lourinhã, Portugal). Buletini i Shkencave Gjeologjike. 1(2014), 410. Abstractleal_et_al_2014_cbgassav1-_abstract_dinosaur_footprints__page_410.pdf

Abstract
Late Jurassic dinosaur footprints were found on a coastline cliff in Lourinhã, Porto das Barcas, Lagido do Forno (coordinate 39°14.178’N, 9°20.397’W, Portugal) in June 2001. The locality is characterized by steep cliffs with high slopes that are composed of gray and red sandstones/ siltstones. The location belongs to the successions of Lusitanian Basin representing the Porto Novo Member of the Lourinhã Formation. Three natural infills of tridactyl tracks, possibly ascribed to ornithopod, a bipedal herbivore were found, representing a left foot movement, a right and a left one, respectively. Footprints are 300- 400mm wide and have a height of 330-360mm. The footprints are characterized by round fingers, which are elongated due to some degradation/ erosion. The footprints were collected from the field in 2001 and subsequently cleaned, consolidated and glued in the laboratory of the Museum of Lourinhã before being exhibited in a museum display. Stone matrix was removed and a consolidation product was applied, probably a polyvinyl acetate. The footprint with broken central digit was glued with an epoxy resin, Araldite. Both applied products were confirmed by analysis of μ- FTIR and both presented colour change and detachment surface problems. The footprints have been exposed in the palaeontology hall of the Museum of Lourinhã, Portugal from 2004 without climate controlling. These trace fossils form an important part of the palaeontological collection of Late Jurassic vertebrate fossils from Lourinhã Formation. Presently, it is considered a unique heritage in danger of disappearing due to high decay level of disaggregation of its geological structure. The footprints display several pathologies, such as “Blistering”, “Powdering”, “Exfoliation”’ as well as “Dirt”, “Fracture”’, “Inscriptions”, “Consolidants” and “Adhesives” and are now in very poor conditions. Laboratorial analysed were made to evaluate the presence of salts. Moreover a microclimatic study was conducted inside the museum to evaluate the influence of thermo-hygrometric parameters on the decay processes. The future interventions will depend on the results of consolidation trials that are currently under progress by using stone samples taken from the same layer and location from Porto das Barcas applying different commercial consolidation products.

Mateus, O., Neto de Carvalho C., & Klompmaker A. A. (2013).  Decapod crustacean body and ichnofossils from the Mesozoic of Portugal. 5th Symposium on Mesozoic and Cenozoic Decapod Crustaceans. , 25–27 June 2013, Warszawa: Polish Geological Institute − National Research Institute & AGH University of Science and Technologymateus_et_al_2013_crustacea_mesozoic_portugal_5th_decapod_crustaceans_meeting_2013.pdf
Mateus, O. (2013).  Decapod crustacean body and ichnofossils from the Mesozoic of Portugal. NA, , 1 Abstract

Book of abstracts of the 5th Symposium on Mesozoic and Decapod Crustaceans