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Mateus, O., & Tschopp E. (2013).  Cathetosaurus as a valid sauropod genus and comparisons with Camarasaurus. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, Program and Abstracts, 2013. 173.mateus__tschopp_2013_cathetosaurs_camarasaurus__svp_meeting_abstracts_213.pdf
Jacobs, L., Polcyn M., Mateus O., Scott M., Graf J., Kappelman J., Jacobs B., Schulp A., Morais M., & Goncalves O. (2014).  Cenozoic vertebrates of coastal Angola. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, Program and Abstracts, 2014. 153.jacobs_et_al._2014_cenozoic_vertebrates_of_coastal_angola.pdf
Agnolin, F. L., Mateus O., Milàn J., Marzola M., Wings O., Adolfssen J. S., & Clemmensen L. B. (2018).  Ceratodus tunuensis, sp. nov., a new lungfish (Sarcopterygii, Dipnoi) from the Upper Triassic of central East Greenland. Journal of Vertebrate PaleontologyJournal of Vertebrate Paleontology. e1439834., 2018: Taylor & Francis Abstractagnolin_et_al_2018_ceratodus_tunuensis_greenland.pdfWebsite

ABSTRACTThe fossil record of post-Paleozoic lungfishes in Greenland is currently restricted to a few brief reports of isolated and undetermined tooth plates coming from the uppermost Fleming Fjord Formation (late Norian) in Jameson Land, central East Greenland. Here, we describe Ceratodus tunuensis, sp. nov., a new dipnoan from a thin bed of calcareous lake mudstone from the ?rsted Dal Member of the Fleming Fjord Formation. The Ceratodus fossil record indicates that during the Late Triassic, this genus was restricted to the middle latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere. This record matches previous paleobiogeographical analyses and indicates that terrestrial biota during the Late Triassic was strongly influenced by paleolatitude.Citation for this article: Agnolin, F. L., O. Mateus, J. Milàn, M. Marzola, O. Wings, J. Schulz Adolfssen, and L. B. Clemmensen. 2018. Ceratodus tunuensis, sp. nov., a new lungfish (Sarcopterygii, Dipnoi) from the Upper Triassic of central East Greenland. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. DOI: 10.1080/02724634.2018.1439834.

Agnolin, F. L., Mateus O., Milàn J., Marzola M., Wings O., Adolfssen J. S., & Clemmensen L. B. (2018).  Ceratodus tunuensis, sp. nov., a new lungfish (Sarcopterygii, Dipnoi) from the Upper Triassic of central East Greenland. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. e1439834., apr: Informa {UK} Limited AbstractWebsite
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Tschopp, E., & Mateus O. (2013).  Clavicles, interclavicles, gastralia, and sternal ribs in sauropod dinosaurs: new reports from Diplodocidae and their morphological, functional and evolutionary implications. Journal of Anatomy. 222, 321-340. Abstracttschopp__mateus_2013_clavicles_interclavicles_gastralia_and_sternal_ribs_in_diplodocid.pdfWebsite

Ossified gastralia, clavicles and sternal ribs are known in a variety of reptilians, including dinosaurs. In sauropods, however, the identity of these bones is controversial. The peculiar shapes of these bones complicate their identification, which led to various differing interpretations in the past. Here we describe different elements from the chest region of diplodocids, found near Shell, Wyoming, USA. Five morphotypes are easily distinguishable: (A) elongated, relatively stout, curved elements with a spatulate and a bifurcate end resemble much the previously reported sauropod clavicles, but might actually represent interclavicles; (B) short, L-shaped elements, mostly preserved as a symmetrical pair, probably are the real clavicles, as indicated by new findings in diplodocids; (C) slender, rod-like bones with rugose ends are highly similar to elements identified as sauropod sternal ribs; (D) curved bones with wide, probably medial ends constitute the fourth morphotype, herein interpreted as gastralia; and (E) irregularly shaped elements, often with extended rugosities, are included into the fifth morphotype, tentatively identified as sternal ribs and/or intercostal elements. To our knowledge, the bones previously interpreted as sauropod clavicles were always found as single bones, which sheds doubt on the validity of their identification. Various lines of evidence presented herein suggest they might actually be interclavicles – which are single elements. This would be the first definitive evidence of interclavicles in dinosauromorphs. Previously supposed interclavicles in the early sauropodomorph Massospondylus or the theropods Oviraptor and Velociraptor were later reinterpreted as clavicles or furculae. Independent from their identification, the existence of the reported bones has both phylogenetic and functional significance. Their presence in non-neosauropod Eusauropoda and Flagellicaudata and probable absence in rebbachisaurs and Titanosauriformes shows a clear character polarity. This implicates that the ossification of these bones can be considered plesiomorphic for Sauropoda. The proposed presence of interclavicles in sauropods may give further support to a recent study, which finds a homology of the avian furcula with the interclavicle to be equally parsimonious to the traditional theory that furcula were formed by the fusion of the clavicles. Functional implications are the stabilizing of the chest region, which coincides with the development of elongated cervical and caudal vertebral columns or the use of the tail as defensive weapon. The loss of ossified chest bones coincides with more widely spaced limbs, and the evolution of a wide-gauge locomotor style.

Tschopp, E., Mateus O., & Norell M. (2018).  Complex Overlapping Joints between Facial Bones Allowing Limited Anterior Sliding Movements of the Snout in Diplodocid Sauropods. American Museum NovitatesAmerican Museum Novitates. 1 - 16., 2018: American Museum of Natural History Abstracttschopp_et_al_2018.pdfWebsite

ABSTRACT Diplodocid sauropods had a unique skull morphology, with posteriorly retracted nares, an elongated snout, and anteriorly restricted, peglike teeth. Because of the lack of extant analogs in skull structure and tooth morphology, understanding their feeding strategy and diet has been difficult. Furthermore, the general rarity of sauropod skulls and the fragility of their facial elements resulted in a restricted knowledge of cranial anatomy, in particular regarding the internal surface of the facial skull. Here, we describe in detail a well-preserved diplodocid skull visible in medial view. Diagnostic features recognized in other skulls observable in lateral view, such as the extended contribution of the jugal to the antorbital fenestra, are obliterated in medial view due to extensive overlapping joints between the maxilla, jugal, quadratojugal, and the lacrimal. These overlapping joints permitted limited anterior sliding movement of the snout, which likely served as a kind of ?shock-absorbing? mechanism during feeding. Diplodocid skulls therefore seem to have evolved to alleviate stresses inflicted on the snout during backward movements of the head, as would be expected during branch-stripping or raking.ABSTRACT Diplodocid sauropods had a unique skull morphology, with posteriorly retracted nares, an elongated snout, and anteriorly restricted, peglike teeth. Because of the lack of extant analogs in skull structure and tooth morphology, understanding their feeding strategy and diet has been difficult. Furthermore, the general rarity of sauropod skulls and the fragility of their facial elements resulted in a restricted knowledge of cranial anatomy, in particular regarding the internal surface of the facial skull. Here, we describe in detail a well-preserved diplodocid skull visible in medial view. Diagnostic features recognized in other skulls observable in lateral view, such as the extended contribution of the jugal to the antorbital fenestra, are obliterated in medial view due to extensive overlapping joints between the maxilla, jugal, quadratojugal, and the lacrimal. These overlapping joints permitted limited anterior sliding movement of the snout, which likely served as a kind of ?shock-absorbing? mechanism during feeding. Diplodocid skulls therefore seem to have evolved to alleviate stresses inflicted on the snout during backward movements of the head, as would be expected during branch-stripping or raking.

Moreno-Azanza, M., Bauluz B., Canudo J. I., & Mateus O. (2017).  The conservative structure of the ornithopod eggshell: electron backscatter diffraction characterization of Guegoolithus turolensis from the Early Cretaceous of Spain. Journal of Iberian Geology. 1-9., 2017 Abstractthe_conservative_structure_of_the_ornithopod_eggshell.pdfWebsite

The Spheroolithidae oospecies Guegoolithus turolensis, putatively attributed to non-hadrosauroid styracosterns was first described in the Barremian of the Iberian Basin, and later reported in the Valanginian–Hauterivian of the Cameros Basin, with both occurrences separated by a few hundred kilometres but by over 10 million years.

Moreno-Azanza, M., Bauluz B., Canudo J. I., & Mateus O. (2017).  The conservative structure of the ornithopod eggshell: electron backscatter diffraction characterization of Guegoolithus turolensis from the Early Cretaceous of Spain. Journal of Iberian Geology. 43, 235–243., jun, Number 2: Springer Nature AbstractWebsite
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Tschopp, E., Brinkman D., Henderson J., Turner M. A., & Mateus O. (2018).  Considerations on the replacement of a type species in the case of the sauropod dinosaur Diplodocus Marsh, 1878. Geology of the Intermountain West. 5, 245-262.tschoppetal2018.pdf
Tschopp, E., Brinkman D., Henderson J., Turner M. A., & Mateus O. (2018).  Considerations on the replacement of a type species in the case of the sauropod dinosaur Diplodocus Marsh, 1878. Geology of the Intermountain West. 5, 245-262. Abstract
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Hansen, B. B., Milàn J., Clemmensen L. B., Adolfssen J. S., Estrup E. J., Klein N., Mateus O., & Wings O. (2016).  Coprolites from the Late Triassic Kap Stewart Formation, Jameson Land, East Greenland: morphology, classification and prey inclusions. Geological Society, London, Special Publications. 434(1), 49-69. Abstracthansen_et_al_2015_coprolites_from_the_late_triassic_kap_stewart_formation_jameson_land_east_greenland.pdfWebsite

A large collection of vertebrate coprolites from black lacustrine shales in the Late Triassic (Rhaetian–Sinemurian) Kap Stewart Formation, East Greenland is examined with regard to internal and external morphology, prey inclusions, and possible relationships to the contemporary vertebrate fauna. A number of the coprolites were mineralogically examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD), showing the primary mineral composition to be apatite, clay minerals, carbonates and, occasionally, quartz in the form of secondary mineral grains. The coprolite assemblage shows multiple sizes and morphotypes of coprolites, and different types of prey inclusions, demonstrating that the coprolite assemblage originates from a variety of different producers.Supplementary material: A description of the size, shape, structure, texture, contents and preservation of the 328 specimens is available at https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.c.2134335

Hansen, B. B., Milàn J., Clemmensen L. B., Adolfssen J. S., Estrup E. J., Klein N., Mateus O., & Wings O. (2015).  Coprolites from the Late Triassic Kap Stewart Formation, Jameson Land, East Greenland: morphology, classification and prey inclusions. Geological Society, London, Special Publications. 434, AbstractWebsite

A large collection of vertebrate coprolites from black lacustrine shales in the Late Triassic (Rhaetian–Sinemurian) Kap Stewart Formation, East Greenland is examined with regard to internal and external morphology, prey inclusions, and possible relationships to the contemporary vertebrate fauna. A number of the coprolites were mineralogically examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD), showing the primary mineral composition to be apatite, clay minerals, carbonates and, occasionally, quartz in the form of secondary mineral grains. The coprolite assemblage shows multiple sizes and morphotypes of coprolites, and different types of prey inclusions, demonstrating that the coprolite assemblage originates from a variety of different producers.Supplementary material: A description of the size, shape, structure, texture, contents and preservation of the 328 specimens is available at https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.c.2134335

Mateus, I., Mateus H., Antunes M. T., Mateus O., Taquet P., Ribeiro V., & Manuppella G. (1997).  Couvée, oeufs et embryons d'un dinosaure théropode du Jurassique supérieur de Lourinhã (Portugal). C.R Acad. Sci. Paris, Sciences de la terre et des planetes. 325, 71-78., Jully, Number 1 Abstractmateus_et_al_1997_eggs_embryos_nest__couvee_oeufs_et_embryons_dun_dinosaure_theropode_du_jurassique_superieur_de_lourinha_portugal.pdfWebsite

Several well preserved clutches of dinosaurs have been discovered in the upper Kimmeridgian/ Tithonian of Lourinhã (Estramadur Province, Portugal). Some eggs of one clutch contained embryo elements of a theropod dinosaur. The egg-shell resembles that of eggs which have been discovered in the Upper Jurassic of Colorado

Mateus, I., Mateus H., Antunes M. T., Mateus O., Taquet P., Ribeiro V., & Manuppella G. (1997).  Couvée, oeufs et embryons d'un dinosaure théropode du Jurassique supérieur de Lourinhã (Portugal). Comptes Rendus de l'Académie des Sciences-Series IIA-Earth and Planetary Science. 325, 71–78., Number 1 Abstract
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Mateus, I., Mateus H., Antunes M. T., Mateus O., Taquet P., Ribeiro V., & Manuppella G. (1997).  Couvée, øe}ufs et embryons d{\textquotesingle}un Dinosaure Théropode du Jurassique supérieur de Lourinha (Portugal). Comptes Rendus de l{\textquotesingle}Académie des Sciences - Series {IIA} - Earth and Planetary Science. 325, 71–78., jul, Number 1: Elsevier {BV} AbstractWebsite
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Mateus, I., Mateus H., Antunes M. T., Mateus O., Taquet P., Ribeiro V., & Manuppella G. (1997).  Couvée, œufs et embryons d'un Dinosaure Théropode du Jurassique supérieur de Lourinhã (Portugal). Comptes Rendus de l'Academie de Sciences - Serie IIa: Sciences de la Terre et des Planetes. 325, 71–78., Number 1 Abstract
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Stockdale, M., Benton M., & Mateus O. (2014).  Cracking dinosaur endothermy: paleophysiology unscrambled. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. Program and Abstracts, 2014, 235-236.stockdale_et_al_2014_eggshells_abstract_svp.pdf
Marx, M. P., Mateus O., Polcyn M. J., Schulp A. S., Gonçalves O. A., & Jacobs L. L. (2021).  The cranial anatomy and relationships of Cardiocorax mukulu (Plesiosauria: Elasmosauridae) from Bentiaba, Angola. PLOS ONE. 16(8), e0255773 - ., 2021/08/17: Public Library of Science Abstractmarx_et_al_2021_cardiocorax_angola.pdfWebsite

We report a new specimen of the plesiosaur Cardiocorax mukulu that includes the most complete plesiosaur skull from sub-Saharan Africa. The well-preserved three-dimensional nature of the skull offers rare insight into the cranial anatomy of elasmosaurid plesiosaurians. The new specimen of Cardiocorax mukulu was recovered from Bentiaba, Namibe Province in Angola, approximately three meters above the holotype. The new specimen also includes an atlas-axis complex, seventeen postaxial cervical vertebrae, partial ribs, a femur, and limb elements. It is identified as Cardiocorax mukulu based on an apomorphy shared with the holotype where the cervical neural spine is approximately as long anteroposteriorly as the centrum and exhibits a sinusoidal anterior margin. The new specimen is nearly identical to the holotype and previously referred material in all other aspects. Cardiocorax mukulu is returned in an early-branching or intermediate position in Elasmosauridae in four out of the six of our phylogenetic analyses. Cardiocorax mukulu lacks the elongated cervical vertebrae that is characteristic of the extremely long-necked elasmosaurines, and the broad skull with and a high number of maxillary teeth (28–40) which is characteristic of Aristonectinae. Currently, the most parsimonious explanation concerning elasmosaurid evolutionary relationships, is that Cardiocorax mukulu represents an older lineage of elasmosaurids in the Maastrichtian.

Mateus, O., Morais M. L., Schulp A. S., Jacobs L. L., & Polcyn M. J. (2006).  The Cretaceous of Angola. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 26, 96-97., Number (Suppl. To 3) Abstract
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Mateus, O., Morais M. L., Schulp A. S., Jacobs L. L., & Polcyn M. J. (2006).  The Cretaceous of Angola. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 26, 96–97., Number (Suppl. T Abstract
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Jacobs, L. L., Mateus O., Polcyn M. J., Schulp A. S., Scotese C. R., Goswami A., Ferguson K. M., Robbins J. A., Vineyard D. P., & Neto A. B. (2009).  Cretaceous paleogeography, paleoclimatology, and amniote biogeography of the low and mid-latitude South Atlantic Ocean. BULLETIN DE LA SOCIETE GEOLOGIQUE DE FRANCE. 180, 333-341., Jan: Univ Agostinho Neto, Univ Nova Lisboa, So Methodist Univ, Univ Texas Arlington, Museu Lourinha, Nat Hist Museum Abstractjacobs_mateus_et_al_2009_cretaceous_paleogeography_paleoclimatology_and_amniote_biogeography_of_the_south_atlantic_ocean_angola_africa_currents.pdf

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Jacobs, L. L., Mateus O., Polcyn M. J., Schulp A. S., Scotese C. R., Goswami A., Ferguson K. M., Robbins J. A., Vineyard D. P., & Neto A. B. (2009).  Cretaceous paleogeography, paleoclimatology, and amniote biogeography of the low and mid-latitude South Atlantic Ocean. Bulletin de la Societe Geologique de France. 180, 333-341., Number 4 Abstract
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Jacobs, L., Polcyn M., Mateus O., Schulp A. S., & Neto A. B. (2009).  The Cretaceous Skeleton Coast of Angola. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 29, 121A., Jan Abstractjacobs_et_al_2009cretaceousskeletoncoas.pdfWebsite

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Mateus, O. (2009).  The Cretaceous Skeleton Coast of Angola. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 29, 121A., 1, Number 3: Taylor & Francis Abstract

THE CRETACEOUS SKELETON COAST OF ANGOLA JACOBS, Louis, SMU, Dallas, TX, USA; POLCYN, Michael, SMU, Dallas, TX, USA; MATEUS, Octávio, Museu da Lourinhã, Lourinhã, Portugal; SCHULP, Anne, Natuurhistorisch Museum Maastricht, Maastricht, Netherlands; NETO, André , Universidade Agostinho Neto, Luanda, Angola Cretaceous coastal sediments of Angola present a rich and diverse fauna of marine amniotes, including turtles, mosasaurs, and plesiosaurs. The abundance of mosasaurs in particular suggests a highly productive coastal area. Angola today lies at the northern limit of the Namibian Desert, the so-called Skeleton Coast, which results from prevailing southeasterly winds of the descending limb of the southern Hadley Cell sweeping across the African coast. The Benguela upwelling and a highly productive sea are found today off the Namibian Desert coast. However, the Benguela upwelling system, based on results of DSDP studies, is said to have originated in the late Neogene and therefore cannot explain the productivity found along the length of the West African coast. The explanation is found in the northward drift of Africa through the arid climate zone, and is demonstrated by the tracing of the paleogeographic position of fossil localities through time.

Jacobs, L., Polcyn M., Mateus O., Schulp, & Neto A. (2009).  The Cretaceous Skeleton Coast of Angola. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 29, 121., Number 3 Abstract
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Jacobs, L. L., Polcyn M. J., Mateus O., Schulp A. S., & Neto A. (2009).  The Cretaceous Skeleton Coast of Angola. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 29, 121–121., Number 3 Abstract
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Russo, J., Mateus O., Balbino A., & Marzola M. (2014).  Crocodylomorph eggs and eggshells from the Lourinhã Fm. (Upper Jurassic), Portugal. Comunicações Geológicas. 101, Especial I, 563-566. Abstractrusso_et_al_2014_crocodylomorph_eggs_and_eggshells_from_the_lourinha_fm_upper_jurassic_portugal.pdf

We here present fossil Crocodylomorpha eggshells from the Upper Jurassic Lourinhã Formation of Portugal, recovered from five sites: one nest from Cambelas with 13 eggs, and three partial eggs and various fragments from, Paimogo N (I), Paimogo S (II), Casal da Rola, and Peralta. All specimens but the nest were found in association with dinosaur egg material. Our research reveals that on a micro- and ultrastructural analysis, all samples present the typical characters consistent with crocodiloid eggshell morphotype, such as the shell unit shape, the organization of the eggshell layers, and the triangular blocky extinction observed with crossed nicols. We assign the material from the Lourinhã Formation to the oofamily Krokolithidae, making it the oldest crocodylomorph eggs known so far, as well as the best record for eggs of non- crocodylian crocodylomorphs. Furthermore, our study indicates that the basic structure of crocodiloid eggshells has remained stable since at least the Upper Jurassic.

Russo, J., Mateus O., Balbino A., & Marzola M. (2014).  Crocodylomorph eggs and eggshells from the Lourinhã Fm. (Upper Jurassic), Portugal. Comunica\\c cões Geológicas. 101, Especial I, 563-566. Abstract
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Russo, J., Mateus O., Balbino A., & Marzola M. (2014).  Crocodylomorph eggs and eggshells from the Lourinhã Fm. (Upper Jurassic), Portugal. Comunica\\c cões Geológicas. 101, Especial I, 563-566. Abstract
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Russo, J., Mateus O., Balbino A., & Marzola M. (2014).  Crocodylomorph eggs and eggshells from the Lourinhã Fm. (Upper Jurassic), Portugal. Comunica\\c cões Geológicas. 101, Especial I, 563-566. Abstract

We here present fossil Crocodylomorpha eggshells from the Upper Jurassic Lourinhã Formation of Portugal, recovered from five sites: one nest from Cambelas with 13 eggs, and three partial eggs and various fragments from, Paimogo N (I), Paimogo S (II), Casal da Rola, and Peralta. All specimens but the nest were found in association with dinosaur egg material. Our research reveals that on a micro- and ultrastructural analysis, all samples present the typical characters consistent with crocodiloid eggshell morphotype, such as the shell unit shape, the organization of the eggshell layers, and the triangular blocky extinction observed with crossed nicols. We assign the material from the Lourinhã Formation to the oofamily Krokolithidae, making it the oldest crocodylomorph eggs known so far, as well as the best record for eggs of non- crocodylian crocodylomorphs. Furthermore, our study indicates that the basic structure of crocodiloid eggshells has remained stable since at least the Upper Jurassic.

Marzola, M., Mateus O., Shubin N. H., & Clemmensen L. B. (2017).  Cyclotosaurus naraserluki, sp. nov., a new Late Triassic cyclotosaurid (Amphibia, Temnospondyli) from the Fleming Fjord Formation of the Jameson Land Basin (East Greenland). Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. e1303501., 2017: Taylor & Francis Abstractmarzola_et_al_2017_cyclotosaurus_greenland.pdfWebsite

ABSTRACTCyclotosaurus naraserluki, sp. nov., is a new Late Triassic capitosaurid amphibian from lacustrine deposits in the Fleming Fjord Formation of the Jameson Land Basin in Greenland. It is based on a fairly complete and well-preserved skull associated with two vertebral intercentra. Previously reported as Cyclotosaurus cf. posthumus, C. naraserluki is unique among cyclotosaurs for having the postorbitals embaying the supratemporals posteromedially. The anterior palatal vacuity presents an autapomorphic complete subdivision by a wide medial premaxillary-vomerine bony connection. The parasphenoid projects between the pterygoids and the exoccipitals, preventing a suture between the two, a primitive condition shared with Rhinesuchidae, Eryosuchus, and Kupferzellia. Within Cyclotosaurus, the Greenlandic skull has a distinctive combination of circular choanae (shared with C. ebrachensis, C. posthumus, and C. robustus) and a convex posteromedial margin of the tabulars (also present in C. ebrachensis and C. intermedius). A phylogenetic analysis indicates that C. naraserluki is the sister taxon of the middle Norian C. mordax from southern Germany, with which it shares a pair of premaxillary foramina. Cyclotosaurus is one of the most successful and diverse genera of Late Triassic temnospondyls, with at least eight species reported from middle Carnian to late Norian. Cyclotosaurus naraserluki is the largest amphibian ever reported from Greenland and one of the Late Triassic vertebrates with the highest northern paleolatitude currently known.http://zoobank.org/urn:lsid:zoobank.org:pub:43AAA541-031C-4EE1-B819-4846EBBD1BBBSUPPLEMENTAL DATA?Supplemental materials are available for this article for free at www.tandfonline.com/UJVPCitation for this article: Marzola, M., O. Mateus, N. H. Shubin, and L. B. Clemmensen. 2017. Cyclotosaurus naraserluki, sp. nov., a new Late Triassic cyclotosaurid (Amphibia, Temnospondyli) from the Fleming Fjord Formation of the Jameson Land Basin (East Greenland). Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. DOI: 10.1080/02724634.2017.1303501.ABSTRACTCyclotosaurus naraserluki, sp. nov., is a new Late Triassic capitosaurid amphibian from lacustrine deposits in the Fleming Fjord Formation of the Jameson Land Basin in Greenland. It is based on a fairly complete and well-preserved skull associated with two vertebral intercentra. Previously reported as Cyclotosaurus cf. posthumus, C. naraserluki is unique among cyclotosaurs for having the postorbitals embaying the supratemporals posteromedially. The anterior palatal vacuity presents an autapomorphic complete subdivision by a wide medial premaxillary-vomerine bony connection. The parasphenoid projects between the pterygoids and the exoccipitals, preventing a suture between the two, a primitive condition shared with Rhinesuchidae, Eryosuchus, and Kupferzellia. Within Cyclotosaurus, the Greenlandic skull has a distinctive combination of circular choanae (shared with C. ebrachensis, C. posthumus, and C. robustus) and a convex posteromedial margin of the tabulars (also present in C. ebrachensis and C. intermedius). A phylogenetic analysis indicates that C. naraserluki is the sister taxon of the middle Norian C. mordax from southern Germany, with which it shares a pair of premaxillary foramina. Cyclotosaurus is one of the most successful and diverse genera of Late Triassic temnospondyls, with at least eight species reported from middle Carnian to late Norian. Cyclotosaurus naraserluki is the largest amphibian ever reported from Greenland and one of the Late Triassic vertebrates with the highest northern paleolatitude currently known.http://zoobank.org/urn:lsid:zoobank.org:pub:43AAA541-031C-4EE1-B819-4846EBBD1BBBSUPPLEMENTAL DATA?Supplemental materials are available for this article for free at www.tandfonline.com/UJVPCitation for this article: Marzola, M., O. Mateus, N. H. Shubin, and L. B. Clemmensen. 2017. Cyclotosaurus naraserluki, sp. nov., a new Late Triassic cyclotosaurid (Amphibia, Temnospondyli) from the Fleming Fjord Formation of the Jameson Land Basin (East Greenland). Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. DOI: 10.1080/02724634.2017.1303501.

Marzola, M., Mateus O., Shubin N. H., & Clemmensen L. B. (2017).  Cyclotosaurus naraserluki, sp. nov., a new Late Triassic cyclotosaurid (Amphibia, Temnospondyli) from the Fleming Fjord Formation of the Jameson Land Basin (East Greenland). Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. e1303501., may: Informa {UK} Limited AbstractWebsite
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Leal, A. S., Mateus O., Tomás C., & Dionísio A. (2014).  Decay and conservation trial of Late Jurassic sandstone with dinosaur tracks in a museum environment (Museum of Lourinhã, Portugal). Buletini i Shkencave Gjeologjike. 1(2014), 410. Abstractleal_et_al_2014_cbgassav1-_abstract_dinosaur_footprints__page_410.pdf

Abstract
Late Jurassic dinosaur footprints were found on a coastline cliff in Lourinhã, Porto das Barcas, Lagido do Forno (coordinate 39°14.178’N, 9°20.397’W, Portugal) in June 2001. The locality is characterized by steep cliffs with high slopes that are composed of gray and red sandstones/ siltstones. The location belongs to the successions of Lusitanian Basin representing the Porto Novo Member of the Lourinhã Formation. Three natural infills of tridactyl tracks, possibly ascribed to ornithopod, a bipedal herbivore were found, representing a left foot movement, a right and a left one, respectively. Footprints are 300- 400mm wide and have a height of 330-360mm. The footprints are characterized by round fingers, which are elongated due to some degradation/ erosion. The footprints were collected from the field in 2001 and subsequently cleaned, consolidated and glued in the laboratory of the Museum of Lourinhã before being exhibited in a museum display. Stone matrix was removed and a consolidation product was applied, probably a polyvinyl acetate. The footprint with broken central digit was glued with an epoxy resin, Araldite. Both applied products were confirmed by analysis of μ- FTIR and both presented colour change and detachment surface problems. The footprints have been exposed in the palaeontology hall of the Museum of Lourinhã, Portugal from 2004 without climate controlling. These trace fossils form an important part of the palaeontological collection of Late Jurassic vertebrate fossils from Lourinhã Formation. Presently, it is considered a unique heritage in danger of disappearing due to high decay level of disaggregation of its geological structure. The footprints display several pathologies, such as “Blistering”, “Powdering”, “Exfoliation”’ as well as “Dirt”, “Fracture”’, “Inscriptions”, “Consolidants” and “Adhesives” and are now in very poor conditions. Laboratorial analysed were made to evaluate the presence of salts. Moreover a microclimatic study was conducted inside the museum to evaluate the influence of thermo-hygrometric parameters on the decay processes. The future interventions will depend on the results of consolidation trials that are currently under progress by using stone samples taken from the same layer and location from Porto das Barcas applying different commercial consolidation products.

Hayashi, S., Carpenter K., Watabe M., Mateus O., & Barsbold R. (2008).  Defensive weapons of thyreophoran dinosaurs: histological comparisons and structural differences in spikes and clubs of ankylosaurs and stegosaurs. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 28(3, Supplement), 89A-90A., Number Suppl. to 3 Abstracthayashi_et_al_2008_histology_stegosaurs_defensive_weapons_of_thyreophoran_dinosaurs-_histological_comparisons_and_structural_differences_in_spikes_and_clubs_of_ankylosaurs_and_stegosaurs.pdfWebsite

Thyreophoran dinosaurs have spike- and club-shaped osteoderms probably used for defensive weapons. The structural and histological variations have been little known. Here, we provide the comparisons of the internal structures in defensive weapons of ankylosaurs and stegosaurs, using spikes of a polacanthid (Gastonia) and a nodosaurid (Edmontonia), clubs of ankylosaurids (Saichania and Ankylosauridae indet. from Canada), and spikes of stegosaurids (Stegosaurus and Dacentrurus), which sheds light on understandings of evolutionary history and functional implications of defensive weapons in thyreophorans. In ankylosaurs, the structural and histological features of spikes and clubs are similar with those of small osteoderms in having thin compact bones, thick cancellous bones with large vascular canals, and abundant collagen fibers. A previous study demonstrated that each of three groups of ankylosaurs (polacanthid, nodosaurid, and ankylosaurid) has distinct characteristic arrangements of collagen fibers in small osteoderms. This study shows that spikes and clubs of ankylosaurs maintain the same characteristic features for each group despite of the differences in shapes and sizes. Conversely, the spike-shaped osteoderms in primitive (Dacentrurus) and derived (Stegosaurus) stegosaurids have similar structure to each other and are significantly different from the other types of stegosaur osteoderms (throat bony ossicles and plates) in having thick compact bones with a medullary cavity. These lack abundant collagen fibers unlike ankylosaur osteoderms. The spikes of ankylosaurs and stegosaurs are similar in shape, but their structural and histological features are different in having unique structures of collagen fibers for ankylosaurs and thick compact bones for stegosaurs, providing enough strength to have large spikes and to use them as defensive weapons. Although the shapes of ankylosaur clubs are different from spikes, the internal structures are similar, suggesting that ankylosaurs maintain similar structures despite of different shapes in osteoderms. These results indicate that ankylosaurs and stegosaurs used different strategies independently to evolve defensive weapons.

Hayashi, S., Carpenter K., Watabe M., Mateus O., & Barsbold R. (2008).  Defensive weapons of thyreophoran dinosaurs: histological comparisons and structural differences in spikes and clubs of ankylosaurs and stegosaurs. 28 (3, Supplement), 89A-90A. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 28, 89-90., Number Suppl. to 3 Abstract
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Hayashi, S., Carpenter K., Watabe M., Mateus O., & Barsbold R. (2008).  Defensive weapons of thyreophoran dinosaurs: histological comparisons and structural differences in spikes and clubs of ankylosaurs and stegosaurs. 28 (3, Supplement), 89A-90A. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 28, 89–90., Number Suppl. to Abstract
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Hendrickx, C., Mateus O., & Araújo R. (2015).  The dentition of megalosaurid theropods. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica. 60(3), 627–642. Abstracthendrickx_et_al_2015_theropod_teeth_app.pdfWebsite

Theropod teeth are particularly abundant in the fossil record and frequently reported in the literature. Yet, the dentition of many theropods has not been described comprehensively, omitting details on the denticle shape, crown ornamentation and enamel texture. This paucity of information has been particularly striking in basal clades, thus making identification of isolated teeth difficult, and taxonomic assignments uncertain. We here provide a detailed description of the dentition of Megalosauridae, and a comparison to and distinction from superficially similar teeth of all major theropod clades. Megalosaurid dinosaurs are characterized by a mesial carina facing mesiolabially in most mesial teeth, centrally positioned carinae on both most mesial and lateral crowns, a mesial carina terminating above the cervix, and short to well-developed interdenticular sulci between distal denticles. A discriminant analysis performed on a dataset of numerical data collected on the teeth of 62 theropod taxa reveals that megalosaurid teeth are hardly distinguishable from other theropod clades with ziphodont dentition. This study highlights the importance of detailing anatomical descriptions and providing additional morphometric data on teeth with the purpose of helping to identify isolated theropod teeth in the future.

Hendrickx, C., Mateus O., & Araújo R. (2014).  The dentition of Megalosauridae (Theropoda: Dinosauria). {APP}. : Polska Akademia Nauk Instytut Paleobiologii (Institute of Paleobiology, Polish Academy of Sciences) AbstractWebsite
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Martins, R. M. S., Beckmann F., Castanhinha R., Mateus O., & Pranzas P. K. (2011).  Dinosaur and crocodile fossils from the mesozoic of Portugal: Neutron tomography and synchrotron-radiation based micro-computed tomography. Materials Research Society Symposium Proceedings. 1319, 319-332. Abstract
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Castanhinha, R., Araujo R., & Mateus O. (2009).  Dinosaur eggshell and embryo localities in Lourinhã Formation, Late Jurassic, Portugal. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 29, 76., Number 3 Abstract
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Castanhinha, R., Araujo R., & Mateus O. (2009).  Dinosaur eggshell and embryo localities in Lourinhã Formation, Late Jurassic, Portugal. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 29, 76–76., Number 3 Abstract
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Mateus, O., Overbeeke M., & Rita F. (2008).  Dinosaur Frauds, Hoaxes and "Frankensteins": How to distinguish fake and genuine vertebrate fossils. Journal of Paleontological Techniques. 2, 1-5.. Abstractmateus_et_al_2008_dinosaur_frauds_hoaxes_and_frankensteins-_how_to_distinguish_fake_and_genuine_vertebrate_fossils._journal_of_paleontological_techniques.pdfWebsite

Dinosaurs and other fossils have been artificially enhanced, or totally forged, to increase their commercial value. The most problematic forgeries to detect are based on original fossils that are artificially assembled. Several techniques are suggested for detecting hoaxes: detailed visual examination, chemical analysis, Xray or CT-scan, and ultraviolet light. It is recommended that museums and paleontological researchers do not purchase and/or trade fossils lacking clear provenience information. Exceptions to that general rule should be closely examined using techniques described herein.

Mateus, O., Overbeeke M., & Rita F. (2008).  Dinosaur Frauds, Hoaxes and "Frankensteins": How to distinguish fake and genuine vertebrate fossils. Journal of Paleontological Techniques. 2, 1-5. Abstract
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Mateus, O., & Andersen E. (1998).  Dinosaurrede i Gedser- portugisisk specialitet udstilles i Gedser. GeologiskNyt. 3/98, 7. Abstract
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