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Mateus, O., Overbeeke M., & Rita F. (2008).  Dinosaur Frauds, Hoaxes and "Frankensteins": How to distinguish fake and genuine vertebrate fossils. Journal of Paleontological Techniques. 2, 1-5. Abstract
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Mateus, O., Jacobs L. L., Schulp A. S., Polcyn M. J., Tavares T. S., Neto A. B., Morais M. L., & Antunes M. T. (2011).  Angolatitan adamastor, a new sauropod dinosaur and the first record from Angola.. Anais da Academia Brasileira de Ciências. 83, 221-233., Jan Abstractmateus_et_al_2011_angolatitan_adamastor_sauropod.pdfWebsite

A forelimb of a new sauropod dinosaur (Angolatitan adamastor n. gen. et sp.) from the Late Turonian of Iembe (Bengo Province) represents the first dinosaur discovery in Angola, and is one of the few occurrences of sauropod dinosaurs in sub-Saharan Africa collected with good chronological controls. The marginal marine sediments yielding the specimen are reported to be late Turonian in age and, thus it represents a non-titanosaurian sauropod in sub-Saharan Africa at a time taken to be dominated by titanosaurian forms. Moreover, Angolatitan adamastor is the only basal Somphospondyli known in the Late Cretaceous which implies in the existence of relict forms in Africa.

Mateus, O., and Dinis J., Cunha P. P., & and (2017).  The Lourinhã Formation: the Upper Jurassic to lower most Cretaceous of the Lusitanian Basin, Portugal – landscapes where dinosaurs walked. Ciências da Terra - Earth Sciences Journal. 19, 75–97., sep, Number 1: {NOVA}.{ID}.{FCT} AbstractWebsite
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Mateus, O. (1996).  Situação populacional de Hemidactylus turcicus em Évora-Portugal. Actas do IV Congresso Luso-Espanhol de Herpetologia. 45., Porto Abstractmateus_1996_population_situation_of_hemidactyus_turcicus_in_evora_portugal_iv_congresso_lusoespanhol_herpetologia.pdf

A survey of Hemidactylus turcicus L. (Reptilia, Gekkonidae) was carried out from March to October
of 1996, in temporally limited transects, using quadrats of 160x160 meters, in the World Heritage site
of Évora. Occasional observations were also made in 1995 and 1996. Hemidactylus turcicus is
common in the sampled area, occurring in 56% of the quadrats, and prefers quiet streets. The species
Tarentola mauritanica was not observed in Évora but it appears 10 Km to the Southwest of this town.
Diurnal activity and winter activity were not observed.

Mateus, O. (2016).  Exemplos bizarros de evolução em dinossauros e alguns casos portugueses. Do Big Bang ao Homem. 81-95., Porto Abstract
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Mateus, O. (1999).  Monofilia dos dinossauros e Origem das Aves: Serão as aves dinossauros?. (Spea- Sociedade Portuguesa para o Estudo das Aves, P, P Catry, F Moreira, Ed.).Actas do II Congresso de Ornitologia. 184-185., Lisboa Abstract
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Mateus, O., Taquet P., Antunes M. T., Mateus H., & Ribeiro V. (1998).  Theropod dinosaur nest from Lourinhã, Portugal. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 18, 61A., Number (Suppl. 3) Abstractmateus_et_al_1998_theropod_dinosaur_nest_from_lourinha_portugal_svp.pdfWebsite

More than 100 well preserved dinosaur eggs have been discovered in the Upper Jurassic levels (Tithonian) of Lourinhã, Portugal. The eggshels dispersed in a big area with 11 meters in the highest diameter with high concentration in the middle.
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Mateus, O., & Azinheira C. (1996).  Passeriformes nidificantes da Ribeira da Viscossa (Évora). (Spea, Ed.).Livro de resumos do I Congresso de Ornitologia. Abstract
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Mateus, O., & Antunes M. T. (2003).  A New Dinosaur Tracksite in the Lower Cretaceous of Portugal. Ciências da Terra. 15, 253-262. Abstractmateus__antunes_2003-_early_k_dino_tracks_portugal.pdfWebsite

A new Lower Cretaceous (Aptian-Albian) dinosaur tracksite at the Olhos de Água beach is described. It is the first vertebrate fossil finding ever found in the concerned unit, and yielded 128 tracks in 17 trackways within an area of ca. 80 square metres.
Three tridactyl footprint morphotypes have been recognized: - Type 1 (“Iguanodontipus-like”) - trackways D, F, K, J and P; - Type 2 (large theropod), although larger in size, typically from a Grallator-like theropod footprint, i.e. A, B, G, H and O trackways; - Type 3 (medium size theropod); M is the only track of this type. There are other, poorly preserved, unidentified trackways. The theropod, swinging trackway B was produced by an animal that was limping. The theropod track M starts eastwards but drastically changes westwards, speeding up at the same time; this dinosaur decided to turn around and run in the opposite direction.
This site shows three main trackway directions: to the South, to the East, and westwards. Except for the trackway O, large theropods A, B, G and H walked southwards. Perpendicularly to these, ornithopods, small theropods and unidentified trackmakers walked towards East (5) and West (7). The segregation of trackmakers and directions, with large theropod trackways southwards and other dinosaurs’ west or eastwards, may mean that large theropods patrolled a walkway area to an important resource, most probably water, often frequented by ornithopods and smaller theropods. There is no evidence of social behavior or gregarism: footprints’ overposition shows that the large, southwards walking theropods passed on different occasions. Three trackway sequences can be established by chronologic order.

Mateus, O. (2014).  Geological and paleoecological setting of a marine vertebrate bonebed from the Lower Maastrichtian at Bentiaba, Angola. Proceedings of the Secondary Adaptation of Tetrapods to Aquatic Life. NA., 1 Abstract

A single, geographically and temporally restricted horizon at Bentiaba, Angola (14.3° S), preserves a concentration of skeletons and isolated elements representing sharks, rays, bony fish, at least three species of turtles, two species of plesiosaurs, at least five species of mosasaurs, and rare volant and terrestrial forms. The concentration, referred to as the Bench 19 Fauna, formed on a narrow continental shelf at paleolatitude 24°S as predicted by paleomagnetic data and confirmed by plate motion models. The shelf evolved as a transform passive margin along faults associated with the opening of the South Atlantic. Latitude 24°S falls today along the coast of northern Namibia, an area of intense upwelling and hyperarid coastal desert. The Namibe Basin in southern Angola is separated from the Walvis Basin of Namibia by the Walvis Ridge, and the continental shelf in northern Namibia is eight times the width of that at Bentiaba. However, the sediment entombing the fossils at Bentiaba is an immature feldspathic sand, shown by detrital zircon ages to be derived from nearby exposed granitic shield rocks, suggesting similar climatic and drainage conditions between the two regions. Temporal control of the Bentiaba section is provided by magnetostratigraphy and stable carbon isotope chemostratigraphy anchored by an Ar40/Ar39radiometric date on basalt. The age of Bench 19 is constrained to chron C32n.1n and thus falls between 71.4 and 71.64 Ma. Massive bedding without hummocky cross-bedding or other sedimentary structures indicates deposition in shallow water below wave base. δ18O analysis of bivalve shells indicates a water temperature of 18° C immediately below Bench 19. Nearest neighbor distance peaks at 5 m (n=19

Mateus, O., & Tschopp E. (2013).  Cathetosaurus as a valid sauropod genus and comparisons with Camarasaurus. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, Program and Abstracts, 2013. 173.mateus__tschopp_2013_cathetosaurs_camarasaurus__svp_meeting_abstracts_213.pdf
Mateus, O. (2009).  Dinolourinhã – a integração dos jovens na paleontologia: o caso-estudo do Museu da Lourinhã.. Journal of Paleontological Techniques. 28–29., 1 Abstract
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Mateus, O., Jacobs L. L., Polcyn M. J., Myers T. S., & Schulp A. S. (2015).  The fossil record of testudines from angola from the turonian to oligocene. Society of Vertebrate Paleontology Annual Meeting. 177., Dallasmateus_et_al_2015_testudines_angola_svp_abstract.pdf
Mateus, O. (2011).  A new metoposaurid (temnospondyl) bonebed from the Late Triassic of Portugal. 31, , 1 Abstract

The end-Triassic extinction event (ETE), considered one of the ‘Big Five’ mass extinctions, marks a dividing line between early Mesozoic vertebrate assemblages, typically including abundant temnospondyls, basal synapsids and basal archosaurs, and ‘typical’ Mesozoic faunas dominated by dinosaurs, pterosaurs, crocodylomorphs, turtles and mammaliaforms. Recent geochemical work has provided strong evidence that the ETE is synchronous with, and likely caused by, the emplacement of the Central Atlantic magmatic province (CAMP). However, stratigraphic sections containing both terrestrial vertebrates and CAMP basalts are scarce, complicating attempts to examine terrestrial faunal changes during this extinction event. The Triassic–Jurassic Algarve Basin, southern Portugal, is an extensional rift basin to-marginal marine red beds (the ‘Grés de Silves’ Group) interbedded with CAMP basalts.... bonebed from the interval ‘AB1’ of the Grés de Silves. Preliminary excavations yielded at least nine well-preserved temnospondyl individuals represented by partial to nearly complete skulls and disarticulated postcranial elements of juvenile to adult ages. Nearly all material appears to represent a single species of metoposaurid referable to the genus Metoposaurus, well known from the late Carnian–early Norian of Germany and Poland. A number of char- acters of the occiput and mandible suggest that the Algarve material may represent a new species. This new material provides new data on the diversity and paleogeographical distri- bution of the metoposaurids, a highly autapomorphic and peculiar group composed of large aquatic carnivores with a unique elongated but brevirostral skull. This taxon also provides [...] Horizon may be within or close to the late Carnian–early Norian. Additional bone-bearing horizons within the ‘Grés de Silves’ provide a rare opportunity to examine terrestrial faunal change in the lead-up to the ETE.

Mateus, O., Natario C., Araujo R., & Castanhinha R. (2008).  A new specimen of spinosaurid dinosaur aff. Baryonyx from the Early Cretaceous of Portugal. Livro de Resumos do X Congresso Luso-Espanhol de Herpetologia. 51–51., Coimbra Abstract
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Mateus, O. (2010).  Physical drivers of evolution and the history of the marine tetrapod fauna of Angola. –, , 1 Abstract

Modern marine species populations are often evaluated in terms of bottom-up, resource limited structure, or top-down, predator controlled structure. In a larger timeframe, investiga- tion of physical drivers in marine tetrapod evolution relies on the recognition of patterns and the correlation in timing of physical events with biotic change. However, it has been dem- onstrated through the study of fossil cetaceans that a broader deep-time perspective within a top-down or bottom-up framework is informative. Here we examine the fossil record of &UHWDFHRXV PDULQH WHWUDSRGV LQ $QJROD WR GLVFHUQ SDWWHUQV WKDW PD\ UHÀHFW SK\VLFDO GULYHUV RI evolution, and that are also relevant to population structure. In modern marine ecosystems, GLVWULEXWLRQ SDWWHUQV UHÀHFWLQJ SULPDU\ SURGXFWLYLW\ DUH LQGLFDWLYH RI ERWWRP?XS FRQWURO? ,Q the fossil record, productivity-controlled distribution patterns can also be perceived. Physi- cal parameters resulting in environmental stability, sea-level change, oceanic anoxic events, paleoclimate, and paleogeography are examined in comparison with taxonomic diversity and life history patterns. Mosasaurs originated during a time of high global temperatures and shallow temperature gradients. As upper-trophic-level species of modest size and plesiopedal limb structure (capable of terrestrial locomotion), early mosasaurs were subject to both top- down and bottom up pressures. The attainment of larger size coupled with emigration and biogeographic distribution in areas of high primary productivity, and niche differentiation VKRZQ E\ 13C values, indicate bottom-up pressures. Productivity along the African coast since the formation of the Atlantic Ocean facilitated the co-occurrence of diverse marine tetrapods through time, and has culminated today in the Benguela large marine ecosystem. Just as the current Benguela ecosystem has tetrapod species populations dominated by both bottom-up (cetaceans) and top-down strategies (sea birds and pinnipeds), so too did the Cre- taceous community, with mosasaurs and plesiosaurs having predominantly bottom-up popu- lation structure, while sea turtles and pterosaurs were more subject to top-down pressures.

Mateus, O. (2008).  Two ornithischian dinosaurs renamed: Microceratops Bohlin 1953 and Diceratops Lull 1905. Journal of Paleontology. 82, , Number 2 Abstract
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Mateus, O. (2007).  Notes and review of the ornithischian dinosaurs of Portugal. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 27, 114A-114A., Jan: Society of Vertebrate Paleontology Abstractmateus_2007_notes_and_review_of_ornithichians_of_portugall.pdf

The record of ornithischian dinosaurs from Portugal is substantial but incomplete in terms of our understanding of taxonomic composition and details of the anatomy of many forms. New data and reinterpretation of these forms are provided. The basal thyreophoran from the Lower Jurassic (the nomen dubium “Lusitanosaurus liasicus”) is the most primitive dinosaur from Iberia. Concerning the Late Jurassic, new material from the Lourinhã Formation (Kimmeridgian/Tithonian) referable to the stegosaur Dacentrurus provides additional information on the systematic position and osteology.
The new material shows two rows of paired triangular plates, with a notch in the anterior rim. A maxillary of an ankylosaur from the Vale Frades (Lourinhã Fm.) is here reported, but cannot be referable to Dracopelta, the only ankylosaur genus currently known from Portugal. The ornithopod Alocodon kuehnei reported as Middle Jurassic (Callovian) is probably Oxfordian in age. A right dentary (ML768 from Zimbral) from the Lourinhã Formation, Kimmeridgian/Tithonian, and shares affinities with Dryosaurus but possesses more denticulation and no secondary ridges, suggesting the occurrence of a new or unreported species for the Late Jurassic of Portugal, which is here tentatively ascribed to aff. Dryosaurus sp. In summary, the Late Jurassic ornithischians species/genera from Portugal include Dacentrurus armatus, Stegosaurus cf. ungulatus, Dracopelta zbyszewskii, Phyllodon henkeli, Hypsilophodon sp., Alocodon kuehnei, Trimucrodon cuneatus, aff. Dryosaurus and Draconyx loureiroi. The Lower Cretaceous (Hauterivian / Barremian) of Praia das Aguncheiras, in Cabo Espichel, provided a partial left maxillary (CPGP.1.99.7) of a basal iguanodontian that shows affinities with Camptosaurus, and is tentatively assigned to this genus. The maxillary teeth denticles differ from Iguanodon or other Iguanodontoidea because not show mammillations. More material is necessary to validate but, to be true, that would confirm the presence of this genus in the lower Cretaceous. The Iguanodon has been well reported in the Lower Cretaceous of Cabo Espichel.

Mateus, O., & Antunes M. T. (2003).  A new dinosaur tracksite in the Lower Cretaceous of Portugal. Ciências da Terra (UNL). 15, 253–262. Abstract
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Mateus, O. (1999).  Upper Jurassic dinosaurs of Lourinhã (Portugal). Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 19(Suppl. to 3), 62A., Number (Suppl. to 3)mateus_1999_upper_jurassic_lourinha_portugal_svp_1999_abstracts.pdfWebsite
Mateus, I., Mateus H., Antunes M. T., Mateus O., Taquet P., Ribeiro V., & Manuppella G. (1997).  Couvée, oeufs et embryons d'un dinosaure théropode du Jurassique supérieur de Lourinhã (Portugal). Comptes Rendus de l'Académie des Sciences-Series IIA-Earth and Planetary Science. 325, 71–78., Number 1 Abstract
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Mateus, O., Jacobs L. L., Polcyn M. J., Schulp A. S., Neto A. B., & Antunes M. T. (2008).  Dinosaur and turtles from the Turonian of Iembe, Angola. Livro de Resumos de Tercer Congreso Latinoamericano de Paleontologia de Vertebrados. 156., Neuquén, Argentina Abstractmateus_et_al_2008_dinosaur_and_turtles_from_the_turonian_of_iembe_angola.pdf

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Mateus, O. (2014).  Degradation processes and consolidation of Late Jurassic sandstone dinosaur tracks in museum environment (Museum of Lourinhã, Portugal). Geophysical Research Abstracts. Geophysical Research Abstracts, EGU2014–9026–1, 2014., 1 Abstract
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Mateus, O., Polcyn M. J., Jacobs L. L., Araújo R., Schulp A. S., Marinheiro J., Pereira B., & Vineyard D. (2012).  Cretaceous amniotes from Angola: dinosaurs, pterosaurs, mosasaurs, plesiosaurs, and turtles. V Jornadas Internacionales sobre Paleontología de Dinosaurios y su Entorno. 71-105., Salas de los Infantes, Burgos Abstractmateus_et_al_2012_amniotes_from_angola_cretaceous_amniotes_from_angola_dinosaurs_pterosaurs_mosasaurs.pdf

Although rich in Cretaceous vertebrate fossils, prior to 2005 the amniote fossil record of Angola was poorly known. Two horizons and localities have yielded the majority of the vertebrate fossils collected thus far; the Turonian Itombe Formation of Iembe in Bengo Province and the Maastrichtian Mocuio Formation of Bentiaba in Namibe Province. Amniotes of the Mesozoic of Angola are currently restricted to the Cretaceous and include eucryptodire turtles, plesiosaurs, mosasaurs, pterosaurs, and dinosaurs. Recent collecting efforts have greatly expanded our knowledge of the amniote fauna of Angola and most of the taxa reported here were unknown prior to 2005.

Mateus, O., Dinis J., & Cunha P. (2014).  Upper Jurassic to Lowermost Cretaceous of the Lusitanian Basin, Portugal-landscapes where dinosaurs walked. Ciências da Terra, special. , Number 8 Abstract
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Mateus, O., Dyke G. A. J., Motchurova-Dekova N., Kamenov G. D., & Ivanov P. (2010).  The first record of a dinosaur from Bulgaria. Lethaia. 43, 88-94., Number 1 Abstract
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Mateus, O. (2014).  Gigantic Jurassic predators. 52 Things You Should Know About Palaeontology. 56-57.: Agile Libremateus_2014_gigantic_jurassic_predators.pdf
Mateus, O., Maidment S. C. R., & Christiansen N. A. (2008).  A new specimen aff. Dacentrurus armatus (Dinosauria: Stegosauridae) from the Late Jurassic of Portugal. Livro de Resumos de Tercer Congreso Latinoamericano de Paleontología de Vertebrados. 157., Neuquén, Argentina Abstract
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Mateus, O., Puértolas-Pascual E., & Callapez P. M. (2018).  A new eusuchian crocodylomorph from the Cenomanian (Late Cretaceous) of Portugal reveals novel implications on the origin of Crocodylia. Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society. , dec: Oxford University Press ({OUP}) AbstractWebsite
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Mateus, O., & Antunes M. T. (2000).  Torvosaurus sp. (Dinosauria : Theropoda) in the Late Jurassic of Portugal. Livro de Resumos do I Congresso Ibérico de Paleontologia, pp: 115-117. 115-117. Abstractmateus_antunes_2000_torvosaurus_sp.dinosauria_-_theropoda_in_the_late_jurassic_of_portugal.pdf

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Mateus, O., Callapez {P. M. }, & Puértolas-Pascual E. (2017).  The oldest Crocodylia? a new eusuchian from the Late Cretaceous (Cenomanian) of Portugal. 160. Abstract
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Mateus, O., & Antunes M. T. (2000).  On the presence of Ceratosaurus sp. (Dinosauria: Theropoda) in the Late Jurassic of Portugal. Abstract volume of the 31st International Geological Congress. , Rio de Janeiro, Brazil Abstract
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Mateus, O., Taquet P., Antunes M. T., Mateus H., & Ribeiro V. (1998).  Theropod dinosaur nest from Lourinhã, Portugal. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 18, 61., Number (Suppl. 3) Abstract
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Mateus, O., & Milan J. (2008).  Sauropod forelimb flexibility deduced from deep manus tracks. 52th Paleontological Association Annual Meeting. 18th-21st December 2008,. 67-68.: University of Glasgow Abstractmateus__milan_2008_palass_sauropod_forelimb_flexibility_deduced_from_deep_manus_tracks.pdf

Sauropods are often considered to have very limited mobility and reduced limb flexibility, mainly due to their giant size and consequent weight. In the Upper Jurassic Lourinhã Formation, central-west Portugal, deep vertical natural casts of sauropod manus tracks are often preserved as the infills of the original tracks. These manus tracks are vertical-walled, with marks of the striations of the skin scales, showing that the movement of the sauropod manus impacting and exiting the mud was totally vertical with no horizontal component of the stride. Some tracks are up to 66 cm deep, which is equivalent to the height of whole sauropod manus. This means that sauropods could lift their anterior feet in a complete vertical manner. Such movement is only possible if there is mobility at elbow and shoulder articulations in a higher degree than previously thought for sauropods. Our vision of sauropod limbs as inflexible columns has to be updated to a more dynamic model for limbs and body.

Mateus, O. (2014).  Comparison of modern and fossil Crocodylomorpha eggs and contribution to the oophylogeny of Amniota. Annual Meeting of the European Association of Vertebrate Palaeontologists. , p. 192, Regione Piemonte: European Association of Vertebrate Palaeontologists. Museo Regionale di Scienze Naturali. Abstract
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Mateus, O., & Estraviz-López D. (2022).  A new theropod dinosaur from the early cretaceous (Barremian) of Cabo Espichel, Portugal: Implications for spinosaurid evolution. PLOS ONE. 17, 1-48., 02, Number 2: Public Library of Science Abstractjournal.pone_.0262614.pdfWebsite

Spinosaurids are some of the most enigmatic Mesozoic theropod dinosaurs due to their unique adaptations to aquatic environments and their relative scarcity. Their taxonomy has proven to be especially problematic. Recent discoveries from Western Europe in general, specifically Iberia, provide some of the best specimens for the understanding of their phylogeny, leading to the description of the spinosaurid Vallibonavenatrix cani and the recognition of the Iberian dinosaur Camarillasaurus cirugedae as one of them. Portuguese associated spinosaurid remains (ML1190) from the Papo Seco Formation (early Barremian) were previously assigned to Baryonyx walkeri but new material recovered in 2020 along with new phylogenetic analyses suggests a different phylogenetic placement, making their revision necessary. Here we show that these remains are not attributable to Baryonyx walkeri, but to a new genus and species, Iberospinus natarioi, gen. et sp. nov. The new taxon is characterized by the presence of a single Meckelian foramen in the Meckelian sulcus, a straight profile of the ventral surface of the dentary and a distal thickening of the acromion process of the pubis between other characters. Iberospinus natarioi is recovered as a sister taxon of the clade formed by Baryonyx and Suchomimus, and outside Spinosaurinae when Vallibonaventrix cani is excluded from the analysis. The description of this taxon reinforces Iberia as a hotspot for spinosaur biodiversity, with several endemic taxa for the region. As expected for the clade, the dentary displays a highly vascularized neurovascular network. The morphometric analysis of parts of the skeleton (pedal phalanx and caudal vertebrae, among others) shows an intermediate condition between basal tetanurans and spinosaurines.

Mateus, O. (2012).  Ontogenetical changes in the quadrate of basal tetanurans. Fundamental!. 101–104., 1 Abstract

Although nonavian theropod have received considerable interest in the last years, their ontogeny still remains poorly understood, especially the ontogenetical changes affecting their skull (Rauhutand Fechner, 2005). The quadrate, for instance, is preserved in several embryos and juvenile specimens belonging to many clades of theropods such as the Tyrannosauridae (Carr, 1999), Compsognathidae (Dal Sasso and Maganuco, 2011), Therizinosauroidea (Kúndrat et al., 2007), Oviraptoridae (Norell et al., 1994; Norell et al., 2001; Weishampel et al., 2008) and Troodontidae (Varrichio et al., 2002) but very little is usually said about the anatomy of this bone and no one has ever investigated ontogenetical variation in the nonavian theropod quadrate. The discovery of two quadrates belonging to embryos of the sinraptorid Lourinhanosaurus antunesi from Portugal and five isolated quadrates pertaining to juvenile, subadult and adult specimens of Spinosauridae from Morocco fills this gap and allows some ontogenetic information to be drawn for this bone in these two specific clades of Theropoda.

Mateus, O., Jacobs L., Polcyn M., Schulp A. S., Vineyard D., Buta Neto A., & Telles Antunes M. (2009).  The oldest African eucryptodiran turtle from the Cretaceous of Angola. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica. 54, 581-588., Number 4 Abstract
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Mateus, O. (2010).  Colecções e museus de Geologia: missão e gestão. , 1: Ed. Universidade de Coimbra e Centro de Estudos de História e Filosofia da Ciência Abstract
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Mateus, O., & Castanhinha R. (2008).  PaleoAngola- Predadores de um oceano primitivo. National Geographic Portugal. 8, 26-33., Number 91 Abstract
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Mateus, O., & Milan J. (2010).  First records of crocodyle and pterosaur tracks in the Upper Jurassic of Portugal.. New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science Bulletin. 51, 83-87., Jan Abstractmateus_and_milan_2010_portugal_first_records_of_crocodyle_and_pterosaur_tracks_in_the_upper_jurassic_of_portugal.pdfWebsite

The Upper Jurassic of Portugal has a rich vertebrate fauna well documented from both body and trace fossils. Although the occurrence of crocodyles and pterosaurs is well documented from body fossils, trace fossils from both groups were unknown until now. Here we describe an isolated crocodyle-like track from Praia da Peralta and pterosaur tracks from the Kimmeridgian of Pedreira do Avelino, Sesimbra (Azóia Fm.) and Porto das Barcas, Lourinhã (Lourinhã Fm.). An enigmatic track suggests the possible presence of a small, tail-dragging tetrapod.
Possible track-makers are suggested based on the known Late Jurassic vertebrate fauna of Portugal.