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Lallensack,  J. N., Klein  H., Milàn  J., Wings  O., Mateus  O., & Clemmensen  L. B. (2017).  Sauropodomorph dinosaur trackways from the Fleming Fjord Formation of East Greenland: evidence for Late Triassic sauropods. AbstractWebsite
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Tschopp, E., Mateus O., Kosma R., Sander M., Joger U., & Wings O. (2014).  A specimen-level cladistic analysis of Camarasaurus (Dinosauria, Sauropoda) and a revision of camarasaurid taxonomy. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. Program and Abstracts, 2014, 241-242.tschopp_et_al._2014_a_specimen-level_cladistic_analysis_of_camarasaurus.pdf
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Park, J., Lee Y., Currie P. J., Kobayashi Y., Koppelhus E. B., Barsbold R., Lee S., Kim S., & Mateus O. (2019).  Three new skulls of the Late Cretaceous armored dinosaur Talarurus plicatospineus Maleev, 1952. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, Program and Abstracts. 165-166.park_et_al_2019_svp_abstract.pdf
Park, J., Lee Y., Currie P. J., Kobayashi Y., Koppelhus E. B., Barsbold R., Lee S., Kim S., & Mateus O. (2019).  Three new skulls of the Late Cretaceous armored dinosaur Talarurus plicatospineus Maleev, 1952. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, Program and Abstracts. 165-166. Abstract
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Clemmensen, L. B., Kent D. V., Mau M., Mateus O., & Milàn J. (2020).  Triassic lithostratigraphy of the Jameson Land basin (central East Greenland), with emphasis on the new Fleming Fjord Group. Bulletin of the Geological Society of Denmark. 68, 95–132. Abstractclemmensen_et_al_2020_triassic_lithostratigraphy_of_the_jameson_land_basin.pdfWebsite

The lithostratigraphy of the Triassic deposits of the Jameson Land Basin in central East Greenland is revised. The new Scoresby Land Supergroup is now composed of the Wordie Creek, Pingo Dal, Gipsdalen and Fleming Fjord Groups. This paper only deals with the lithostratigraphy of the late Early-Late Triassic continental deposits of the latter three groups with emphasis on the vertebratebearing Fleming Fjord Group. The new Pingo Dal Group consists of three new formations, the Rødstaken, Paradigmabjerg and Klitdal Formations (all elevated from members), the new Gipsdalen Group consists of three new formations, the Kolledalen, Solfaldsdal (with the new Gråklint Member) and Kap Seaforth Formations (all elevated from members), and the new Fleming Fjord Group is subdivided into three new formations, the Edderfugledal, Malmros Klint and Ørsted Dal Formations (all elevated from members). The Edderfugledal Formation contains two cyclic bedded, lacustrine members, a lowermost Sporfjeld Member (elevated from beds), and an uppermost Pingel Dal Member (elevated from beds). The lacustrine red beds of the Malmros Klint Formation are not subdivided. The lacustrine and fluvial Ørsted Dal Formation contains three new members. In the eastern and central part of the basin, the formation is initiated by cyclic bedded, red lacustrine mudstones of the Carlsberg Fjord Member (elevated from beds), while in the northwestern part of the basin the lowermost part of the formation is composed of grey fluvial conglomerates and sandstones with subordinate red mudstones of the Bjergkronerne Member (elevated from beds). The uppermost part of the formations in most of the basin is composed of cyclic bedded, variegated lacustrine mudstones and grey to yellowish marlstones of the Tait Bjerg Member (elevated from beds). The sediments in the Fleming Fjord Group contain remains of a rich and diverse vertebrate fauna including dinosaurs, amphibians, turtles, aeotosaurs, pterosaurs, phytosaurs and mammaliaforms. Most vertebrate bones have been found in uppermost Malmros Klint Formation, and in the Carlsberg Fjord and Tait Bjerg Members. The Norian–early Rhaetian, lacustrine Fleming Fjord Group was deposited at about 41° N on the northern part of the supercontinent Pangaea. Lacustrine sedimentation was controlled by seasonal as well as longer-term (orbital) variation in precipitation. Precipitation was probably brought to the basin by southwesterly winds. The lacustrine sediments of the uppermost Fleming Fjord Group show deposition during increasingly humid conditions changing the lake environment from an ephemeral lake-steppe area to a perennial lake. This evolution of lake environment suggests a change from a winter-wet temperate climate to one with precipitation throughout the year.

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Allain, R., Taquet P., Battail B., Dejax J., Richir P., Veran M., Limon-Duparcmeur F., Vacant R., Mateus O., Sayarath P., Khenthavong B., & Phouyavong S. (1999).  Un nouveau genre de dinosaure sauropode de la formation des Gres superieurs (Aptien-Albien) du Laos. Comptes Rendus de l'Academie des Sciences - Series IIA - Earth and Planetary Science. 329, 609-616., oct, Number 8 Abstractallain_taquet_battail_dejax_richir_mateus_et_al_1999_un_nouveau_genre_de_dinosaure_sauropode_de_la_formation_des_gres_superieurs_aptien-albien_du_laos.pdfWebsite

The partly-articulated postcranial remains of two sauropod skeletons recently found in Tang Vay (Savannakhet Province, Laos) are assigned to the species Tangvayosaurus hoffeti (nov. gen., nov. sp.). The derived characters present in the new material confirm the presence of titanosaurs in South East Asia at the end of the Early Cretaceous, but are not consistent with its placement within Titanosaurus genus as first done by Hoffet in 1942. All of the material relative to this species is therefore referred to a new genus: Tangvayosaurus. Tangvayosaurus and the Thai genus Phuwiangosaurus have strong affinities and are considered as primitive titanosaurs.

Allain, R., Taquet P., Battail B., Dejax J., Richir P., Véran M., Limon-Duparcmeur F., Vacant R., Mateus O., Sayarath P., Khenthavong B., & Phouyavong S. (1999).  Un nouveau genre de dinosaure sauropode de la formation des Grès supérieurs (Aptien-Albien) du Laos. Comptes Rendus de l{\textquotesingle}Académie des Sciences - Series {IIA} - Earth and Planetary Science. 329, 609–616., oct, Number 8: Elsevier {BV} AbstractWebsite
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Clemmensen, L. B., Milàn J., Adolfssen J. S., Estrup E. J., Frobøse N., Klein N., Mateus O., & Wings O. (2015).  The vertebrate-bearing Late Triassic Fleming Fjord Formation of central East Greenland revisited: stratigraphy, palaeoclimate and new palaeontological data. Geological Society, London, Special Publications. 434(1), 31-47. Abstractclemmensenetal2015greenland.pdfWebsite

In Late Triassic (Norian–Rhaetian) times, the Jameson Land Basin lay at 40° N on the northern part of the supercontinent Pangaea. This position placed the basin in a transition zone between the relatively dry interior of the supercontinent and its more humid periphery. Sedimentation in the Jameson Land Basin took place in a lake–mudflat system and was controlled by orbitally forced variations in precipitation. Vertebrate fossils have consistently been found in these lake deposits (Fleming Fjord Formation), and include fishes, dinosaurs, amphibians, turtles, aetosaurs and pterosaurs. Furthermore, the fauna includes mammaliaform teeth and skeletal material. New vertebrate fossils were found during a joint vertebrate palaeontological and sedimentological expedition to Jameson Land in 2012. These new finds include phytosaurs, a second stem testudinatan specimen and new material of sauropodomorph dinosaurs, including osteologically immature individuals. Phytosaurs are a group of predators common in the Late Triassic, but previously unreported from Greenland. The finding includes well-preserved partial skeletons that show the occurrence of four individuals of three size classes. The new finds support a late Norian–early Rhaetian age for the Fleming Fjord Formation, and add new information on the palaeogeographical and palaeolatitudinal distribution of Late Triassic faunal provinces.

Clemmensen, L. B., Milàn J., Adolfssen J. S., Estrup E. J., Frobøse N., Klein N., Mateus O., & Wings O. (2015).  The vertebrate-bearing Late Triassic Fleming Fjord Formation of central East Greenland revisited: stratigraphy, palaeoclimate and new palaeontological data. Geological Society, London, Special Publications. 434, AbstractWebsite

In Late Triassic (Norian–Rhaetian) times, the Jameson Land Basin lay at 40° N on the northern part of the supercontinent Pangaea. This position placed the basin in a transition zone between the relatively dry interior of the supercontinent and its more humid periphery. Sedimentation in the Jameson Land Basin took place in a lake–mudflat system and was controlled by orbitally forced variations in precipitation. Vertebrate fossils have consistently been found in these lake deposits (Fleming Fjord Formation), and include fishes, dinosaurs, amphibians, turtles, aetosaurs and pterosaurs. Furthermore, the fauna includes mammaliaform teeth and skeletal material. New vertebrate fossils were found during a joint vertebrate palaeontological and sedimentological expedition to Jameson Land in 2012. These new finds include phytosaurs, a second stem testudinatan specimen and new material of sauropodomorph dinosaurs, including osteologically immature individuals. Phytosaurs are a group of predators common in the Late Triassic, but previously unreported from Greenland. The finding includes well-preserved partial skeletons that show the occurrence of four individuals of three size classes. The new finds support a late Norian–early Rhaetian age for the Fleming Fjord Formation, and add new information on the palaeogeographical and palaeolatitudinal distribution of Late Triassic faunal provinces.