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1999
Bonaparte, J. F., & Mateus O. (1999).  A new diplodocid, Dinheirosaurus lourinhanensis gen. et sp. nov., from the Late Jurassic beds of Portugal. Revista del Museo Argentino de Ciencias Naturales. 5, 13–29., Number 2 Abstract
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Bonaparte, J. F., & Mateus O. (1999).  A new diplodocid, Dinheirosaurus lourinhanensis gen. et sp. nov., from the Late Jurassic beds of Portugal. Revista del Museo Argentino de Ciencias Naturales. 5, 13–29., Number 2 Abstract
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Allain, R., Taquet P., Battail B., Dejax J., Richir P., Veran M., Limon-Duparcmeur F., & et al (1999).  A new genus of sauropod dinosaur from the Gres superieurs formation (Aptian-Albian) of Laos. Comptes Rendus de l'Academie des Sciences Series IIA Earth and Planetary Science. 329, 609–616., Number 8 Abstract
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Allain, R., Taquet P., Battail B., Dejax J., Richir P., Véran M., Limon-Duparcmeur F., & et al (1999).  A new genus of sauropod dinosaur from the Gres superieurs formation (Aptian-Albian) of Laos | Un nouveau genre de dinosaure sauropode de la formation des Gres superieurs (Aptien-Albien) du Laos. Comptes Rendus de l'Academie de Sciences - Serie IIa: Sciences de la Terre et des Planetes. 329, 609–616., Number 8 Abstract
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Allain, R., Taquet P., Battail B., Dejax J., Richir P., Véran M., Limon-Duparcmeur F., & et al (1999).  Un nouveau genre de dinosaure sauropode de la formation des Grès supérieurs (Aptien-Albien) du Laos. Comptes Rendus de l'Académie des Sciences-Series IIA-Earth and Planetary Science. 329, 609–616., Number 8 Abstract
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Bonaparte, J. F., & Mateus O. (1999).  A new diplodocid, Dinheirosaurus lourinhanensis gen. et sp. nov., from the Late Jurassic beds of Portugal. Rev. Mus. Argent. Cienc. Nat. 5, 13-29., Number 2 Abstractbonapartemateus1999_sauropod_dinheirosaurus_portugal.pdfWebsite

Presacral vertebrae of a new Diplodocidae from the Late Jurassic Amoreira-Porto Novo Formation of Lourinhã, Portugal are described and figured. Dinheirosaurus lourinhanensis gen. et sp. is diagnosed by well developed accessory articulations derived from the hyposphene, exposed in lateral view; and by the smaller dorsoventral length of the lower section of the neural arch. It is considered that the organization of the dorsal neural arch of Dinheirosaurus is more derived than in Diplodocus, except in the dorsoventral development of the lower portion of it, which is higher (more derived) in the latter. Possibly the isolated geography of Portugal in the Late Jurassic gave rise to the distinct characters of this new genus.

Allain, R., Taquet P., Battail B., Dejax J., Richir P., Veran M., Limon-Duparcmeur F., Vacant R., Mateus O., Sayarath P., Khenthavong B., & Phouyavong S. (1999).  Un nouveau genre de dinosaure sauropode de la formation des Gres superieurs (Aptien-Albien) du Laos. Comptes Rendus de l'Academie des Sciences - Series IIA - Earth and Planetary Science. 329, 609-616., oct, Number 8 Abstractallain_taquet_battail_dejax_richir_mateus_et_al_1999_un_nouveau_genre_de_dinosaure_sauropode_de_la_formation_des_gres_superieurs_aptien-albien_du_laos.pdfWebsite

The partly-articulated postcranial remains of two sauropod skeletons recently found in Tang Vay (Savannakhet Province, Laos) are assigned to the species Tangvayosaurus hoffeti (nov. gen., nov. sp.). The derived characters present in the new material confirm the presence of titanosaurs in South East Asia at the end of the Early Cretaceous, but are not consistent with its placement within Titanosaurus genus as first done by Hoffet in 1942. All of the material relative to this species is therefore referred to a new genus: Tangvayosaurus. Tangvayosaurus and the Thai genus Phuwiangosaurus have strong affinities and are considered as primitive titanosaurs.

Allain, R., Taquet P., Battail B., Dejax J., Richir P., Véran M., Limon-Duparcmeur F., Vacant R., Mateus O., Sayarath P., Khenthavong B., & Phouyavong S. (1999).  Un nouveau genre de dinosaure sauropode de la formation des Grès supérieurs (Aptien-Albien) du Laos. Comptes Rendus de l{\textquotesingle}Académie des Sciences - Series {IIA} - Earth and Planetary Science. 329, 609–616., oct, Number 8: Elsevier {BV} AbstractWebsite
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2008
Hayashi, S., Carpenter K., Watabe M., Mateus O., & Barsbold R. (2008).  Defensive weapons of thyreophoran dinosaurs: histological comparisons and structural differences in spikes and clubs of ankylosaurs and stegosaurs. 28 (3, Supplement), 89A-90A. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 28, 89-90., Number Suppl. to 3 Abstract
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Hayashi, S., Carpenter K., Watabe M., Mateus O., & Barsbold R. (2008).  Defensive weapons of thyreophoran dinosaurs: histological comparisons and structural differences in spikes and clubs of ankylosaurs and stegosaurs. 28 (3, Supplement), 89A-90A. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 28, 89–90., Number Suppl. to Abstract
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Hayashi, S., Carpenter K., Watabe M., Mateus O., & Barsbold R. (2008).  Defensive weapons of thyreophoran dinosaurs: histological comparisons and structural differences in spikes and clubs of ankylosaurs and stegosaurs. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 28(3, Supplement), 89A-90A., Number Suppl. to 3 Abstracthayashi_et_al_2008_histology_stegosaurs_defensive_weapons_of_thyreophoran_dinosaurs-_histological_comparisons_and_structural_differences_in_spikes_and_clubs_of_ankylosaurs_and_stegosaurs.pdfWebsite

Thyreophoran dinosaurs have spike- and club-shaped osteoderms probably used for defensive weapons. The structural and histological variations have been little known. Here, we provide the comparisons of the internal structures in defensive weapons of ankylosaurs and stegosaurs, using spikes of a polacanthid (Gastonia) and a nodosaurid (Edmontonia), clubs of ankylosaurids (Saichania and Ankylosauridae indet. from Canada), and spikes of stegosaurids (Stegosaurus and Dacentrurus), which sheds light on understandings of evolutionary history and functional implications of defensive weapons in thyreophorans. In ankylosaurs, the structural and histological features of spikes and clubs are similar with those of small osteoderms in having thin compact bones, thick cancellous bones with large vascular canals, and abundant collagen fibers. A previous study demonstrated that each of three groups of ankylosaurs (polacanthid, nodosaurid, and ankylosaurid) has distinct characteristic arrangements of collagen fibers in small osteoderms. This study shows that spikes and clubs of ankylosaurs maintain the same characteristic features for each group despite of the differences in shapes and sizes. Conversely, the spike-shaped osteoderms in primitive (Dacentrurus) and derived (Stegosaurus) stegosaurids have similar structure to each other and are significantly different from the other types of stegosaur osteoderms (throat bony ossicles and plates) in having thick compact bones with a medullary cavity. These lack abundant collagen fibers unlike ankylosaur osteoderms. The spikes of ankylosaurs and stegosaurs are similar in shape, but their structural and histological features are different in having unique structures of collagen fibers for ankylosaurs and thick compact bones for stegosaurs, providing enough strength to have large spikes and to use them as defensive weapons. Although the shapes of ankylosaur clubs are different from spikes, the internal structures are similar, suggesting that ankylosaurs maintain similar structures despite of different shapes in osteoderms. These results indicate that ankylosaurs and stegosaurs used different strategies independently to evolve defensive weapons.

2009
Brandao, J., Callapez, P., O. Mateus, Castro, P (Eds.). (2009).  International Conference on the Geological Collections and Museums: mission and management. Abstract
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Mateus, O., Jacobs L., Polcyn M., Schulp A. S., Vineyard D., Buta Neto A., & Telles Antunes M. (2009).  The oldest African eucryptodiran turtle from the Cretaceous of Angola. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica. 54, 581-588., Number 4 Abstract
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authors listed, N. (2009).  International Conference on the Geological Collections and Museums: mission and management.. (Brandao J, Callapez P, Mateus O, Castro P, Ed.). , Jan: Journal of Paleontological Techniques 5 (special volume) Abstract
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2010
Mateus, O. (2010).  Paleontological collections of the Museum of Lourinhã (Portugal). (Brandao, JM, Callapez, PM, O. Mateus, Castro, P, Ed.).Colecções e museus de Geologia: missão e gestão. 121–126., 1: Ed. Universidade de Coimbra e Centro de Estudos e Filosofia da História da Ciência Coimbra Abstract
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Mateus, O. (2010).  Paleontological collections of the Museum of Lourinhã (Portugal). (JM Brandão, Callapez, PM, O. Mateus, Castro, P, Ed.).Colecções e museus de Geologia: missão e gestão. 121–126., 1: Ed. Universidade de Coimbra e Centro de Estudos de História e Filosofia da Ciência Abstract
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Brandao, J. M., Callapez P. M., Mateus O., & Castro P. (2010).  Colecções e museus de Geologia: missão e gestão. , Jan: Ed. Universidade de Coimbra e Centro de Estudos e Filosofia da História da Ciência. Abstract

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Mateus, O. (2010).  Paleontological collections of the Museum of Lourinhã (Portugal). (Brandao, JM, Callapez, PM, O. Mateus, Castro, P, Ed.).Colecções e museus de Geologia: missão e gestão. 121-126., Jan: Ed. Universidade de Coimbra e Centro de Estudos e Filosofia da História da Ciência Coimbra Abstractmateus_2010_paleontological_collections_of_the_museum_of_lourinha__geocoleccoes_omateus.pdf

Abstract: The paleontological collections of the Museum of Lourinhã, in Portugal, has a rich paleontological collection, particularly of Late Jurassic dinosaurs of the Lourinhã Formation (Kimmeridgian-Tithonian). Most salient highlights comprehend the following dinosaur holotype specimens: stegosaur Miragaia longicollum, theropod Lourinhanosaurus antunesi, sauropod Dinheirosaurus lourinhanensis, ornithopod Draconyx loureiroi, theropod Allosaurus europaeus, and, a mammal, Kuehneodon hahni. Other dinosaur specimens are referred including the nest and eggs and embryos of Lourinhanosaurus. Portugal is very productive in Late Jurassic vertebrates, being the seventh country bearing more dinosaur taxa.

2011
Martins, R. M. S., Beckmann F., Castanhinha R., Mateus O., & Pranzas P. K. (2011).  Dinosaur and crocodile fossils from the mesozoic of Portugal: Neutron tomography and synchrotron-radiation based micro-computed tomography. Materials Research Society Symposium Proceedings. 1319, 319-332. Abstract
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Martins, R. M. S., Beckmann F., Castanhinha R., Araújo R., O. Mateus, & Pranzas P. K. (2011).  Tomographic techniques for the study of exceptionally preserved dinosaur and crocodile fossils from the mesozoic of Portugal. VII Encontro Nacional de Biologia Evolutiva, Coimbra, 21 Dezembro 2011. 19. Abstractmartins_et_al_mateus_2011_tomographic_techniques_for_the_study_of_exceptionally_preserved_dinosaur_and_crocodile.pdf

Portugal is ranked within the ten countries with more dinosaur taxa and the Lourinhã Formation is known
by the Late Jurassic findings of dinosaurs and other fossils. Often, studies of the external morphological
characteristics of the fossils are not sufficient and, observations of internal structures, using non-
destructive techniques, are required. The fossils here presented belong to the Museum da Lourinhã
(Portugal) and comprise a lower jaw of a basal crocodilian (possibly a Tomistomidae), eggshells and
several vertebrae from the exceptionally well preserved in ovo remains of Late Jurassic theropod dinosaur
Lourinhanosaurus. Neutron Tomography (NT) experiments with this material has been carried out at the
Geesthacht Neutron Facility in Germany. Additionally, eggshell fragments and several vertebrae have
been studied by Synchrotron-Radiation based Micro-Computed Tomography (SRμCT) at the HARWI II and
BW2 beamlines, respectively. These beamlines are operated by the Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht at the
storage ring DORIS III at the Deutsches Elektronen–Synchrotron DESY in Hamburg, Germany. In both cases
(NT and SRμCT) complete 3D recordings have been obtained using a non-destructive procedure. The high-
quality tomographic datasets can be effectively studied through interactive digital visualization. Hence,
these visualization methods provide precious information about the 3D internal micro morphology of
fossils, like the network of the eggshell pores, often invisible in more traditional techniques, and provide a
direct window into the evolutionary history of organisms.

Steyer, J. S., Mateus O., Butler R. J., Brusatte S. L., & Whiteside J. H. (2011).  A new metoposaurid (temnospondyl) bonebed from the Late Triassic of Portugal. 71st Annual Meeting of the Society of Vertebrate Paleontology. 200., Jan: Abstracts of the 71st Annual Meeting of the Society of Vertebrate Paleontology Abstractsteyer_mateus_et_al_2011_._a_new_metoposaurid_temnospondyl_bonebed_from_the_late_triassic_of_portugal_svp11abstracts.pdf

The end-Triassic extinction event (ETE), considered one of the ‘Big Five’ mass extinctions, marks a dividing line between early Mesozoic vertebrate assemblages, typically including abundant temnospondyls, basal synapsids and basal archosaurs, and ‘typical’ Mesozoic faunas dominated by dinosaurs, pterosaurs, crocodylomorphs, turtles and mammaliaforms.
Recent geochemical work has provided strong evidence that the ETE is synchronous with, and likely caused by, the emplacement of the Central Atlantic magmatic province (CAMP).
However, stratigraphic sections containing both terrestrial vertebrates and CAMP basalts are scarce, complicating attempts to examine terrestrial faunal changes during this extinction event. The Triassic–Jurassic Algarve Basin, southern Portugal, is an extensional rift basin

to-marginal marine red beds (the ‘Grés de Silves’ Group) interbedded with CAMP basalts.

bonebed from the interval ‘AB1’ of the Grés de Silves. Preliminary excavations yielded at least nine well-preserved temnospondyl individuals represented by partial to nearly complete skulls and disarticulated postcranial elements of juvenile to adult ages. Nearly all material appears to represent a single species of metoposaurid referable to the genus Metoposaurus, well known from the late Carnian–early Norian of Germany and Poland. A number of characters of the occiput and mandible suggest that the Algarve material may represent a new species. This new material provides new data on the diversity and paleogeographical distribution of the metoposaurids, a highly autapomorphic and peculiar group composed of large aquatic carnivores with a unique elongated but brevirostral skull. This taxon also provides

Horizon may be within or close to the late Carnian–early Norian. Additional bone-bearing horizons within the ‘Grés de Silves’ provide a rare opportunity to examine terrestrial faunal change in the lead-up to the ETE.

2012
Mannion, P. D., Upchurch P., Mateus O., Barnes R. N., & Jonese M. E. H. (2012).  New information on the anatomy and systematic position of Dinheirosaurus lourinhanensis (Sauropoda: Diplodocoidea) from the Late Jurassic of Portugal, with a review of European diplodocoids. Journal of Systematic Palaeontology. 10, 521-551., Number 3 Abstract
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Martins, R. M. S., Castanhinha R. A., Mateus O., Araújo R., Beckmann F., & Schell N. (2012).  {Synchrotron radiation-based techniques applied to the study of dinosaur fossils from the collection of the museum of Lourinhã. Ciencia e Tecnologia dos Materiais. 24, 153-156., Number 3-4 Abstract
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Martins, R. M. S., Beckmann F., Castanhinha R., Mateus O., Araújo R., & Pranzas P. K. (2012).  Synchrotron radiation-based micro-computed tomography applied to the characterization of dinosaur fossils from the Lourinhã Formation. 1 st . Meeting of Synchrotron Radiation Users from Portugal. 1-2., Caparica, Portugalmartins_et_al_2012_tomography_enurs_martins-rui_dinosaurfossils.pdf
Martins, R. M. S., Araújo R., Mateus O., Castanhinha R., Pranzas P. K., & Beckmann F. (2012).  Tomography applied to the study of dinosaur fossils from the collection of the museum of Lourinhã (Portugal). I Congresso Internacional GeoCiencias na CPL. , Coimbra: Univ. Coimbramartins_et_al_2012_abstract.pdf
Mannion, P. D., Upchurch P., Mateus O., Barnes R. N., & Jones M. E. H. (2012).  New information on the anatomy and systematic position of Dinheirosaurus lourinhanensis (Sauropoda: Diplodocoidea) from the Late Jurassic of Portugal, with a review of European diplodocoids. Journal of Systematic Palaeontology. 10(3), 521–551., Jan Abstractmannion_et_al_2012_new_information_on_the_anatomy_and_systematic_position_of_dinheirosaurus_lourinhanensis_sauropoda_-_diplodocoidea_from_the_late_jurassic_of_portugal_with_a_review_of_european_diplodocoids.pdf

Although diplodocoid sauropods from Africa and the Americas are well known, their European record remains largely neglected. Here we redescribe Dinheirosaurus lourinhanensis from the Late Jurassic of Portugal. The holotype comprises two posterior cervical vertebrae, the dorsal series and a caudal centrum. Redescription demonstrates its validity on the basis of three autapomorphies: (1) posteriorly restricted ventral keel on posterior cervical vertebrae; (2) three small subcircular fossae posterior to the lateral coel on posterior cervical neural spines; (3) accessory lamina linking the hyposphene with base of the posterior centrodiapophyseal lamina in middle-posterior dorsal vertebrae. Phylogenetic analysis places Dinheirosaurus as the sister taxon to Supersaurus, and this clade forms the sister taxon to other diplodocines. However, this position should be treated with caution as Dinheirosaurus displays several plesiomorphic features absent in other diplodocids (including unbifurcated presacral neural spines, and dorsolaterally projecting diapophyses on dorsal vertebrae) and only four additional steps are required to place Dinheirosaurus outside of Flagellicaudata. We identify Amazonsaurus as the basal-most rebbachisaurid and recover Zapalasaurus outside of the South American Limaysaurinae, suggesting the biogeographic history of rebbachisaurids is more complex than previously proposed. Review of the European diplodocoid record reveals evidence for the earliest known diplodocid, as well as additional diplodocid remains from the Late Jurassic of Spain. A Portuguese specimen, previously referred to Dinheirosaurus, displays strong similarities to Apatosaurus from the contemporaneous Morrison Formation of North America, indicating the presence of a second Late Jurassic Portuguese diplodocid taxon. Along with Dinheirosaurus, these Portuguese remains provide further evidence for a Late Jurassic palaeobiogeographic connection between Europe and North America. No dicraeosaurids are currently known from Europe, but rebbachisaurids are present in the Early Cretaceous, with weak evidence for the earliest known representative from the Late Jurassic of Spain; however, more complete material is required to recognize early members of this clade.

2013
Mannion, P. D., Upchurch P., Barnes R. N., & Mateus O. (2013).  Osteology of the Late Jurassic Portuguese sauropod dinosaur Lusotitan atalaiensis (Macronaria) and the evolutionary history of basal titanosauriforms. Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society. 168, 98-206., Number 1 Abstract
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Bianucci, G., Miján I., Lambert O., Post K., & Mateus O. (2013).  Bizarre fossil beaked whales (Odontoceti, Ziphiidae) fished from the Atlantic Ocean floor off the Iberian Peninsula. Geodiversitas. 35(1), 105-153. Abstractbianucci_et_al_2013_fossil_beaked_whales_iberian_peninsula.pdf

Forty partial fossil skulls belonging to beaked whales (Cetacea, Odontoceti, Ziphiidae) were collected by trawling and long-line fishing on Neogene (probably Late Early to Middle Miocene) layers of the Atlantic floor off the coasts of Portugal and Spain (Asturias and Galicia). e systematic study of the most diagnostic Iberian specimens, those preserving the rostrum and the dorsal part of the cranium, led to the recognition of two new genera (Globicetus n. gen. and Imocetus n. gen.) and four new species (Choneziphius leidyi n. sp., G. hiberus n. gen., n. sp., I. piscatus n. gen., n. sp., and Tusciziphius atlanticus n. sp.).
Based on the matrix of a previous work, the phylogenetic analysis places all the new taxa in the subfamily Ziphiinae Gray, 1850. More fragmentary specimens are tentatively referred to the genera Caviziphius Bianucci & Post, 2005 and Ziphirostrum du Bus, 1868. Among these new ziphiids, extremely bizarre skull morphologies are observed. In G. hiberus n. gen., n. sp. the proximal portion of the rostrum bears a voluminous premaxillary spheroid. In T. atlanticus n. sp. a medial premaxillary bulge is present on the rostrum; together with asymmetric
rostral maxillary eminences at the rostrum base, this bulge displays various degrees of elevation in different specimens, which may be interpreted as sexual dimorphism. Specimens of I. piscatus n. gen., n. sp. bear two sets of even crests: spur-like rostral maxillary crests and longitudinal maxillary crests laterally bordering a wide and long facial basin. A preliminary macroscopic observation of these elements indicates very dense bones, with a compactness comparable with that of cetacean ear bones. Questioning their function, the high medial rostral elements (the premaxillary spheroid of G. hiberus n. gen., n. sp. and the medial bulge of T. atlanticus n. sp.) remind the huge rostral maxillary crests of adult males of the extant Hyperoodon ampullatus (Forster, 1770). In the latter, the crests are very likely related to head-butting. However, they are made of much more spongy bone than in the fossil taxa studied here, and therefore possibly better mechanically suited for facing impacts. Other interpretations of these unusual bone specializations, related to deep-diving (ballast) and echolocation (sound reflection), fail to explain the diversity of shapes and the hypothetical sexual dimorphism observed in at least part of the taxa. e spur-like rostral maxillary crests and long maxillary crests limiting the large facial basin in I. piscatus n. gen., n. sp. and the excrescences on the maxilla at the rostrum base in Choneziphius spp. are instead interpreted as areas of origin for rostral and facial muscles, acting on the nasal passages, blowhole, and melon. From a palaeobiogeographic point of view, the newly described taxa further emphasize the differences in the North Atlantic (including Iberian Peninsula) and South African Neogene ziphiid faunal lists. Even if the stratigraphic context is poorly understood, leaving open the question of the geological age for most of the dredged specimens, these differences in the composition of cold to temperate northern and southern hemisphere fossil ziphiid faunas may be explained by a warm-water equatorial barrier.

Mannion, P. D., Upchurch P., Barnes R. N., & Mateus O. (2013).  Osteology of the Late Jurassic Portuguese sauropod dinosaur Lusotitan atalaiensis (Macronaria) and the evolutionary history of basal titanosauriforms. Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society. 168, 98-206. Abstractmannion_et_al_2013_sauropod_lusotitan_portugal.pdfWebsite

Titanosauriforms represent a diverse and globally distributed clade of neosauropod dinosaurs, but their inter-relationships remain poorly understood. Here we redescribe Lusotitan atalaiensis from the Late Jurassic Lourinhã Formation of Portugal, a taxon previously referred to Brachiosaurus. The lectotype includes cervical, dorsal, and caudal vertebrae, and elements from the forelimb, hindlimb, and pelvic girdle. Lusotitan is a valid taxon and can be diagnosed by six autapomorphies, including the presence of elongate postzygapophyses that project well beyond the posterior margin of the neural arch in anterior-to-middle caudal vertebrae. A new phylogenetic analysis, focused on elucidating the evolutionary relationships of basal titanosauriforms, is presented, comprising 63 taxa scored for 279 characters. Many of these characters are heavily revised or novel to our study, and a number of ingroup taxa have never previously been incorporated into a phylogenetic analysis. We treated quantitative characters as discrete and continuous data in two parallel analyses, and explored the effect of implied weighting. Although we recovered monophyletic brachiosaurid and somphospondylan sister clades within Titanosauriformes, their compositions were affected by alternative treatments of quantitative data and, especially, by the weighting of such data. This suggests that the treatment of quantitative data is important and the wrong decisions might lead to incorrect tree topologies. In particular, the diversity of Titanosauria was greatly increased by the use of implied weights. Our results support the generic separation of the contemporaneous taxa Brachiosaurus, Giraffatitan, and Lusotitan, with the latter recovered as either a brachiosaurid or the sister taxon to Titanosauriformes. Although Janenschia was recovered as a basal macronarian, outside Titanosauria, the sympatric Australodocus provides body fossil evidence for the pre-Cretaceous origin of titanosaurs. We recovered evidence for a sauropod with close affinities to the Chinese taxon Mamenchisaurus in the Late Jurassic Tendaguru beds of Africa, and present new information demonstrating the wider distribution of caudal pneumaticity within Titanosauria. The earliest known titanosauriform body fossils are from the late Oxfordian (Late Jurassic), although trackway evidence indicates a Middle Jurassic origin. Diversity increased throughout the Late Jurassic, and titanosauriforms did not undergo a severe extinction across the Jurassic/Cretaceous boundary, in contrast to diplodocids and non-neosauropods. Titanosauriform diversity increased in the Barremian and Aptian–Albian as a result of radiations of derived somphospondylans and lithostrotians, respectively, but there was a severe drop (up to 40%) in species numbers at, or near, the Albian/Cenomanian boundary, representing a faunal turnover whereby basal titanosauriforms were replaced by derived titanosaurs, although this transition occurred in a spatiotemporally staggered fashion.

Brusatte, S. L., Butler R. J., Mateus O., Steyer J. S., & Whiteside J. H. (2013).  Terrestrial vertebrates from the Late Triassic of Portugal: new records of temnospondyls and archosauriforms from a Pangaean rift sequence. 61st Symposium on Vertebrate Palaeontology and Comparative Anatomy. 15-16., Edinburgh Abstractbrusatte_et_al_2013_triassic_algarve_portugal_temnospondyls_svpca.org_years_2013_edinburgh_abstracts.pdf

The Late Triassic (ca. 237-201.5 million years ago) was a transitional interval in the evolution of terrestrial ecosystems, during which ‘modern’ clades such as archosaurs and mammals were radiating while ‘archaic’ groups such as temnospondyl amphibians and basal synapsids remained abundant. Little is known about the Triassic terrestrial (nonmarine) vertebrates of the Iberian Peninsula. The Algarve Basin of southern Portugal is an extensional rift basin formed during the breakup of Pangaea, which is filled with terrestrial, lacustrine, and marginal marine siliciclastics of the Grés de Silves Formation, interbedded with CAMP basalts that mark the end-Triassic extinction (radioisotopically dated to ~198-201.5 Ma). Since 2009, our field project in the Algarve has discovered numerous vertebrate specimens within the Grés de Silves, including a monodominant bonebed containing hundreds of specimens of metoposaurids, a peculiar group of temnospondyls that filled crocodile-like predatory niches in lacustrine and fluvial environments. These specimens appear to belong to a new species of Metoposaurus, similar to M. diagnosticus and M. krasiejowensis from central Europe but possessing several putative autapomorphies of the braincase and lower jaw. We also discovered a mandible of a phytosaur, the first specimen of these long-snouted, semi-aquatic archosauriforms from the Iberian Peninsula. These discoveries of characteristic Carnian Norian taxa indicate that the fossil-bearing portion of the Grés de Silves is Late Triassic in age, and provide further evidence that metoposaurids and phytosaurs commonly occurred together in low palaeolatitudes during this time.

Araújo, R., Castanhinha R., Martins R. M. S., Mateus O., Hendrickx C., Beckmann F., Schell N., & Alves L. C. (2013).  Filling the gaps of dinosaur eggshell phylogeny: Late Jurassic Theropod clutch with embryos from Portugal. Scientific Reports. 3(1924), , 2013/05/30/onlin: Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved Abstractaraujo_et_al_2013_filling_the_gaps_of_dinosaur_eggshell_phylogeny_late_jurassic_theropod_clutch_with_embryos_from_portugal.pdf

The non-avian saurischians that have associated eggshells and embryos are represented only by the sauropodomorph Massospondylus and Coelurosauria (derived theropods), thus missing the basal theropod representatives. We report a dinosaur clutch containing several crushed eggs and embryonic material ascribed to the megalosaurid theropod Torvosaurus. It represents the first associated eggshells and embryos of megalosauroids, thus filling an important phylogenetic gap between two distantly related groups of saurischians. These fossils represent the only unequivocal basal theropod embryos found to date. The assemblage was found in early Tithonian fluvial overbank deposits of the Lourinhã Formation in West Portugal. The morphological, microstructural and chemical characterization results of the eggshell fragments indicate very mild diagenesis. Furthermore, these fossils allow unambiguous association of basal theropod osteology with a specific and unique new eggshell morphology.

Araújo, R., Castanhinha R., Martins R. M. S., Mateus O., Hendrickx C., Beckmann F., Schell N., & Alves L. C. (2013).  Filling the gaps of dinosaur eggshell phylogeny: Late Jurassic Theropod clutch with embryos from Portugal. Scientific Reports. 3, , may: Nature Publishing Group AbstractWebsite
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2014
Russo, J., Mateus O., Balbino A., & Marzola M. (2014).  Crocodylomorph eggs and eggshells from the Lourinhã Fm. (Upper Jurassic), Portugal. Comunica\\c cões Geológicas. 101, Especial I, 563-566. Abstract
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Russo, J., Mateus O., Balbino A., & Marzola M. (2014).  Crocodylomorph eggs and eggshells from the Lourinhã Fm. (Upper Jurassic), Portugal. Comunica\\c cões Geológicas. 101, Especial I, 563-566. Abstract
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Russo, J., Mateus O., Balbino A., & Marzola M. (2014).  Crocodylomorph eggs and eggshells from the Lourinhã Fm. (Upper Jurassic), Portugal. Comunica\\c cões Geológicas. 101, Especial I, 563-566. Abstract

We here present fossil Crocodylomorpha eggshells from the Upper Jurassic Lourinhã Formation of Portugal, recovered from five sites: one nest from Cambelas with 13 eggs, and three partial eggs and various fragments from, Paimogo N (I), Paimogo S (II), Casal da Rola, and Peralta. All specimens but the nest were found in association with dinosaur egg material. Our research reveals that on a micro- and ultrastructural analysis, all samples present the typical characters consistent with crocodiloid eggshell morphotype, such as the shell unit shape, the organization of the eggshell layers, and the triangular blocky extinction observed with crossed nicols. We assign the material from the Lourinhã Formation to the oofamily Krokolithidae, making it the oldest crocodylomorph eggs known so far, as well as the best record for eggs of non- crocodylian crocodylomorphs. Furthermore, our study indicates that the basic structure of crocodiloid eggshells has remained stable since at least the Upper Jurassic.

Mateus, O., Butler R. J., Brusatte S. L., Whiteside J. H., & Steyer J. S. (2014).  The first phytosaur (Diapsida, Archosauriformes) from the Late Triassic of the Iberian Peninsula. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 34, 970-975., Number 4 Abstract
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Mateus, O., Butler R. J., Brusatte S. L., Whiteside J. H., & Steyer J. S. (2014).  The first phytosaur (Diapsida, Archosauriformes) from the Late Triassic of the Iberian Peninsula. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 34, 970–975., Number 4 Abstract
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Young, M. T., Hua S., Steel L., Foffa D., Brusatte S. L., Thüring S., Mateus O., Ruiz-Omeñaca J. I., Havlik P., Lepage Y., & De Andrade M. B. (2014).  Revision of the Late Jurassic teleosaurid genus Machimosaurus (Crocodylomorpha, Thalattosuchia). Royal Society Open Science. 1, , Number 2 Abstract
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Stockdale, M., Benton M., & Mateus O. (2014).  Cracking dinosaur endothermy: paleophysiology unscrambled. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. Program and Abstracts, 2014, 235-236.stockdale_et_al_2014_eggshells_abstract_svp.pdf
Russo, J., Mateus O., Balbino A., & Marzola M. (2014).  Crocodylomorph eggs and eggshells from the Lourinhã Fm. (Upper Jurassic), Portugal. Comunicações Geológicas. 101, Especial I, 563-566. Abstractrusso_et_al_2014_crocodylomorph_eggs_and_eggshells_from_the_lourinha_fm_upper_jurassic_portugal.pdf

We here present fossil Crocodylomorpha eggshells from the Upper Jurassic Lourinhã Formation of Portugal, recovered from five sites: one nest from Cambelas with 13 eggs, and three partial eggs and various fragments from, Paimogo N (I), Paimogo S (II), Casal da Rola, and Peralta. All specimens but the nest were found in association with dinosaur egg material. Our research reveals that on a micro- and ultrastructural analysis, all samples present the typical characters consistent with crocodiloid eggshell morphotype, such as the shell unit shape, the organization of the eggshell layers, and the triangular blocky extinction observed with crossed nicols. We assign the material from the Lourinhã Formation to the oofamily Krokolithidae, making it the oldest crocodylomorph eggs known so far, as well as the best record for eggs of non- crocodylian crocodylomorphs. Furthermore, our study indicates that the basic structure of crocodiloid eggshells has remained stable since at least the Upper Jurassic.

Russo, J., Mateus O., Marzola M., & Balbino A. (2014).  Eggs and eggshells of crocodylomorpha from the Late Jurassic of Portugal. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. Program and Abstracts, 2014, 218.russo_et_al_2014eggs_crocodylomorpha_portugal.pdf
Mateus, O., Butler R. J., Brusatte S. L., Whiteside J. H., & Steyer S. J. (2014).  The first phytosaur (Diapsida, Archosauriformes) from the Late Triassic of the Iberian Peninsula. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 34(4), 970-975.mateus_et_al_2014_first_phytosaur_algarve_portugal_jvp.pdfWebsite
Young, M. T., Hua S., Steel L., Foffa D., Brusatte S. L., Thüring S., Mateus O., Ignacio-Ruiz Omeñaca J., Lepage Y., Havilk P., & Andrade M. B. (2014).  Revision of the Late Jurassic teleosaurid genus Machimosaurus (Crocodylomorpha, Thalattosuchia). Royal Society Open Science. 1(140222), 1-42.young_et_al_2014_machimosaurus_crocodylomorph_revision.pdf
2015
Young, M. T., Hua S., Steel L., Foffa D., Brusatte S. L., Thüring S., Mateus O., Ruiz-Omeñaca J. I., Havlik P., Lepage Y., & De Andrade M. B. (2015).  Addendum to ?Revision of the Late Jurassic teleosaurid genus Machimosaurus (Crocodylomorpha, Thalattosuchia)?. Royal Society Open Science. 2, , Number 2 Abstract
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Pereira, B. C., Benton M. J., Ruta M., & Mateus O. (2015).  Mesozoic echinoid diversity in Portugal: Investigating fossil record quality and environmental constraints on a regional scale. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology. 424, 132-146. Abstract
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